How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Have you ever wondered how certain trees just look magically covered in snow?? Well, and just magical?? Today I’m sharing 5 ways to up your tree game…with “snow” so you can have a magical snow covered Christmas tree look too!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I recently posted a photo over on Instagram, (the one below, actually) sharing our Christmas tree from a previous year and got a bunch of questions about how I get the “snowy” white look.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I have shared one way to make your trees snowy white here on the blog.
And it’s the main way to get the look, I suppose. And that would be by flocking them.
Since then, I have found other ways to get the look or add to the look if you already have a flocked tree. (and even if you don’t!)

I thought it was high time to get them all in one place to make it more simple to find. Right now the information is spread out into several posts (besides the one below) so it’s almost impossible to find and utilize.

Here are 5 tips and ideas for creating a snow covered Christmas tree look yourself!

1. Snow Flocking

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I’ve got an ENTIRE post dedicated to doing it this way.
You can read all about it >>> right here.

2. Dusters From The Dollar Store

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

They are small but fluffy and easy to tuck in and around to add bulk…and snow!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
You can usually find these at the Dollar Store or Dollar General. (Dollar Store makes it a win for a budget friendly snow covered Christmas tree)

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
I found some similar ones >>> here in case you can’t find them locally. (I have not tried these though it looks like a good deal at 12 for $6.40)

3. Furry White (or off white) Garland

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I used some of the fluffy white garland AND a few of the dusters on this tree for even more of that snowy look.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The place I purchased mine from is now discontinued but I found some that is very similar, here.

4. Shaggy, Fluffy, Puffy White Fabric

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Anything like the above. (the fabric stores have many, fluffy, furry, etc)

Cut them into long strips and you’ll have a snowy white tree in no time!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The bonus for me on this particular fabric was that it rolled up once cut so the backside does not show at all.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

So soft and pretty.

5. Big, Thick, White Fabric Ribbon

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I used two different kinds of this white tree of ours.

And instead of wrapping around the tree, I simply draped them down top to bottom, tucking here and there.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You can add more or less to complete the look.

And those are my 5 tips and ideas for creating a snow covered Christmas tree look for your home.
You can use one or all of these ideas as they each add a special touch and look of their own.

I hope this has been helpful to you!

Here are a few of our Christmas past posts if you’d like to see more of the trees:

PIN this to save it!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I’ll see you back here on Thursday with a brand new Dollar Store Christmas craft. Fun, fun. 🙂
Have a wonderful week!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Reddit
  • Weibo
  • WhatsApp
  • Flipboard
  • Email
  • 5.4K shares

Make a tabletop snow flocked Christmas tree for almost free! Beautiful winter farmhouse decorations and easy crafts. Best DIY fake snow recipe!

Look at this DIY snowy Christmas tree! Does it remind you of a majestic tree in a winter forest? Although we don’t have the room in our house for a 50′ tall cedar or redwood tree, we are so happy with this mini version!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You won’t believe how easy it is to make this Christmas tree! All you need are some evergreen tree clippings and recycled cardboard.

It looks beautiful even without the snow. If you want a flocked Christmas tree, it only takes a few minutes to make the snow flocking.

* Some resources in article are affiliate links. Full disclosure here .

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Check out the video tutorial or skip to written tutorial below!

Materials to make snow flocked Christmas tree

Step 1: make a cardboard cone

Draw a quarter circle with the circumference about 8 inches, which is the total tree height. You can change this number to make your table top Christmas tree bigger or smaller.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Cut out the quarter circle shape, with a bit extra tab on the end for gluing. Use hot glue or glue to glue together the cardboard cone .

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it5 Minute DIY snowy tree winter and Christmas table decorations!

Step 2: glue small branches to Christmas tree cone

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Start at the bottom, take small pieces of clippings from cedar branches and glue them around the bottom of the cone, over lapping them so the cardboard doesn’t show through.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The clippings should be about 1″ to 2″ passing the bottom edge. You can always trim them later.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Next, glue another row of clippings above the first row. Always overlap adjacent branches. Repeat until the cone is completely covered all the way to the top tip.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You can use this tabletop Christmas tree as is, or add some snow flocking to it! The cedar will stay green for at least a couple of weeks.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step 3: how to make snow flocked Christmas tree

You can use snow spray, snow flocking powder like this on Amazon, or make your own easily in just 10 minutes using white soap bars.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itDIY snow flocking tutorial here.

Take a handful of snow flocking mixture and rub it onto the Christmas tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You can use more flocking to create a very heavily snow flocked Christmas tree, or use a smaller amount so some green still shows through the snow.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The snow flocking will take about 5 to 8 hours to dry. The dried snow is really durable and doesn’t fall off at all when you move the tree around.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You can use the same method to flock bigger Christmas trees, real or fake branches, wreaths, garlands, etc.

Posted on Published: November 12, 2020 – Last updated: January 14, 2022

Do you love the look of snow on a Christmas tree? How would you like to make your home into a Winter Wonderland this year without all the mess?

I’m sharing 2 Easy Steps to Flock a Christmas Tree & more, without all that mess. You can easily add faux snow to trees, wreaths, pinecones and in addition, they stay looking great year after year!

Only Two Ingredients needed to Flock a Tree

This is a simple no mess method that I’ve been using for several years and it is a quick 2 step method.

  1. Mix light weight spackling with small amount of water
  2. Brush onto tree branches with a chip brush

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Be sure you are using lightweight spackling. Regular spackling isn’t recommended.

First, mix the spackling with a small amount of water, gradually adding until you have a mayonnaise like consistency.

  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Be careful to not add too much water. You don’t want the spackling to drip from the branches of your tree.

Begin Flocking your Tree

Now you are ready to start flocking everything in sight. This 2 Easy Steps to Flock a Christmas tree is addictive.

Warning: This really is serious, because you have to control yourself or everything will be flocked.

I’m starting on a small 4′ tree that I’ve had for a couple of years, however I received a new frosted tree from Balsam Hill and wanted this tree to match more closely.

To protect your table from splatters and drips, cover with a drop cloth or a piece of wax paper. If you have mixed properly, the mess will be minimal.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Begin by adding a small amount of spackling to your chip brush and gently brush over the top limbs of the artificial tree.

Because I wanted to match the new larger tree more closely, the tree trunk was also flocked.

The tree was completely covered in less than 10 minutes. Obviously, a larger tree would take much longer.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Flock Pinecones

Another item that looks great flocked is pinecones and these are super easy as well. I have been collecting a few from around the property and decided to add this 2 step flocking method to a few of them.

  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Easy to Flock a Wreath

Because there is still an abundance of flocking leftover, it was also added to a small wreath and another small tree! See how addictive this method is? LOL!!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

You can add the flocking to enhance old Christmas Supplies such as wreaths and garlands. Be sure to check out this cute DIY Garland that I made last weekend. This project could also be flocked by adding artificial greenery and then flocking the greenery to completely change the look the garland.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I used a very light covering for this small tree.

Allow projects to dry

The hardest part of this flocking method is waiting for everything to dry before adding ornaments. It usually takes approx. 2 hours for the spackling to dry thoroughly. Once it’s dry, you are ready to add to your Christmas Décor.

The Finished Flocking Projects

In less than an hour, several flocking projects are completed and after another couple of hours, they are ready to display. Here are just a few examples of this 2 step flocking method.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The tree on the right was flocked last year, using this method and still looks great after being stored all summer.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Antique Candle Co has great candles for the holidays and they make great gifts.

If you like DIY projects during the holidays, here is a cute table riser that was shared a few weeks ago.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

In addition, you can add glitter to your flocking for another look. See How to Repurpose Old Christmas Decorations for more tips.

Do you like this old container? See how we made smaller similar planters out of plywood here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This small tree just received a light amount of flocking.

Thanks so much for stopping by today!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Pin it to remember it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Posted on Published: November 12, 2020 – Last updated: January 14, 2022

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

December 1, 2021

What is a flocked Christmas tree?

Ever wonder how some Christmas trees look like they belong in a snow-covered winter wonderland? Flocking your Christmas tree gives it the same effect. It refers to the process of painting your tree, displaying the illusion that it belongs in a snow-dusted, magical winter forest.

Have an old out-dated artificial tree that needs an update? A flocked tree is the perfect solution. Continue reading to learn how to flock your own Christmas tree without making a mess!

Step One: Gather Materials

  • Artificial Christmas tree
  • Faux paint snow- we used Santa Snow Spray
  • Surface Protection- we used Trimaco’s X•Paper® and secured it down with Trimaco’s Easy Mask® KleenEdge® PerfectEdge™ Tape
  • Plastic sheetings to cover any furniture, such as Trimaco’s Cling Cover®
  • Protective wear
  • Rags to wipe down your stand and any messes!

Step Two: Prep your space

Although the Santa Snow Spray says it produces no overspray, we noticed it does just a bit. We recommend putting down a drop cloth, or surface protection paper to ensure it doesn’t mess up your floor.

As an additional cautious step, we also threw some masking film over the couch, and put on coveralls to protect our clothes. Better safe than sorry!

Step Three: Clean your branches

If you’re working with an older tree that’s been in storage, we recommend cleaning off the branches to remove any dust particles. Use wet microfiber rag and lightly dust!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step Four: Flock it

It’s time to flock. Starting from the bottom, begin slowly and evenly spraying your tree. To give it the full “snow effect”, we sprayed at a downward angle and topped the edges off with additional spray. Make your way around and up the tree in a spiral pattern.

Step Five: Wipe down you stand

The Santa Snow Spray will most likely get on your metal stand. If this happens, don’t fret. Simply take a damp microfiber rag and wipe the artificial snow off.

Step Six: Let your tree dry

Once your tree is lightly dusted to your liking, make sure you let it dry before moving it. It’ll take roughly 2-3 hours for the spray to completely dry. Move your tree into place, and decorate!

DO YOU LOVE THE LOOK OF SNOW ON A CHRISTMAS TREE? HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO MAKE YOUR HOME INTO A WINTER WONDERLAND THIS YEAR WITHOUT ALL THE MESS?

I’m sharing 2 Easy Steps to Flock a Christmas Tree & more, without all that mess. You can easily add faux snow to trees, wreaths, pinecones and in addition, they stay looking great year after year!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This is a simple no mess method that I’ve been using for several years and it is a quick 2 step method.

  1. Mix light weight spackling with small amount of water
  2. Brush onto tree branches with a chip brush

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

First, mix the spackling with a small amount of water, gradually adding until you have a mayonnaise like consistency. Note: Be sure you are using lightweight spackling. Regular spackling isn’t recommended.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I’m starting on a small 4′ tree that I’ve had for a couple of years, however I received a new frosted tree from Balsam Hill and wanted this tree to match more closely. To protect your table from splatters and drips, cover with a drop cloth or a piece of wax paper. If you have mixed properly, the mess will be minimal. Begin by adding a small amount of spackling to your chip brush and gently brush over the top limbs of the artificial tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Because I wanted to match the new larger tree more closely, the tree trunk was also flocked. You can use more of the spackling for a heavier flocking.The tree was completely covered in less than 10 minutes. Obviously, a larger tree would take much longer.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Within less than an hour, several flocking projects are completed and after another couple of hours, they are ready to display. The tree on the right was flocked last year using this same method! It looks just as good this year after being stored. If you’d like to see more examples of this flocking method, be sure to link to the blog site linked below.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Now you are ready to start flocking everything in sight. This 2 Easy Steps to Flock a Christmas tree is addictive. This really is serious, because you have to control yourself or everything will be flocked. If you like Christmas DIY Projects, you might like to know how to dry fruit to use for holiday crafts or how to make a garland using dried fruit and herbs.

Last Updated Date: July 2, 2021 | Published Date: December 29, 2017 by Seng Nickerson

  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Learn how to easily flock a Christmas tree with artificial snow with flocking powder. In this post, we’re showing you an affordable way to add white snow without having to spend a lot of money to get the white, snowy look.

After my hunt last year for the most economical 12 foot Christmas tree, I finally found one that had rave reviews!

Table of Contents

Why Flock a Christmas Tree with Flocking Powder

The way that you know whether a tree is quality or not is based on the pine leaves on the tree. If they are made up of paper that has been cut, that’s pretty much a sign that it will be the most economical (e.g. cheap) tree. The ones made of thin PVC are the ones that you want to go after. This tree that I purchased had a good mixture of both – making it both a quality tree for a really good price.

What I really wanted was a cheap, good quality flocked Christmas tree that was 12 foot tall. I knew that I would have to compromise on something if I wanted something under $1,000.

I really wanted to get a flocked Christmas tree, but it was so dang expensive! It literally was three times the price to get a flocked Christmas tree versus a non-flocked one! Anyway, I settled and got a tree that was pre-lit and 12 feet tall.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

However, I still wanted the flocked look. Look at that dust of snow. I feel like flocked trees provide a great look for a neutral decor home.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

So this year, before taking the Christmas tree down, I’m going to flock it one more time! I’m going to show you how to do it in a few easy steps:

Supplies for Flocking a Christmas Tree to Make It Look Snowy

  • Flocking Powder– It literally looks like flour.
  • Sprayer Bottle – I would recommend getting a large sprayer bottle. Make sure you get one that has an easy to use trigger. My hand started hurting only 10 minutes into spritzing. You might consider using an electronic mister to save your hand.
  • Mesh Kitchen Strainer – I would recommend getting a large strainer.
    Paper or Plastic Tarp – You’ll want a super large tarp to save your floor or grass from all the flocking that will get on the ground.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Directions for How to Flock a Christmas Tree

Figure out where you want to set up your tree. I would do it somewhere that you won’t mind basically throwing something like baby powder everywhere and a place where someone won’t mess with it for 24 hours. I placed it in our unfinished basement.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Initially, I used white spray paint to paint the leaves of the tree, but I didn’t like the look of it up close. This is what it looked like after I spray painted it.

I stopped midway through and bought the flocking.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Start from the top and work your way down.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Spritz water on the section you want to flock. Use the strainer and put the powder in it OR you can throw it on there. Next, spritz water on top of it to make it stay.

Repeat section by section.

Let it dry overnight. Shake off the excess!

You should have an amazing flocked tree for 75% of the price of one done in the store!! In these images, I only used a 3 lb bag.

I will flock it one more time to create the heavier snow look I want for next year!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

What a DIY Flocked Christmas Tree Looks Like

Here it is all lit up without ornaments! I love how easy it is to flock a christmas tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I love how it turned out!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Pin the image below to save it for later! How do you flock a Christmas tree?

Save it for later!

Learn how to flock your own Christmas tree this holiday season for a beautiful snowy and frosted look with this easy step-by-step tutorial and bonus tips!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This post contains affiliate links. Please see my full disclosure policy for more details.

I’ve always admired the gorgeous snow flocked Christmas trees all over Pinterest, but I couldn’t bring myself to trade-up a perfectly good tree just because I wanted a new a look this season. I’d heard great things about Flock in a Box and decided I was brave enough to finally give it a try. And boy am I so glad that I did! For under $30 I was able to completely transform my plain green Christmas tree into something out of a winter wonderland (permanently too)!

This easy Christmas DIY is part of my Thrifty Thursday Series where I team up with some lovely DIY bloggers to bring you ideas to make more of your home for less this holiday season. Be sure to check out the other projects at the end of this post!

I had a ton of questions myself about this process so I wanted to share them with you, along with some tips and tricks I learned to make it a little easier for you. So let’s dive into some quick Q&A’s before we start this easy transformation!

What is a flocked christmas tree?

If you’ve never heard the fancy term “flocked” before, all it really means is covered with a powdery white material. The flock gives any tree that beautiful and fluffy snow covered look.

what is christmas tree flocking made of?

The tree flocking I used is made up of small cellulose paper fibers that contain a self adhesive and flame retardant. Making it both permanent and safe for home use. I would recommend keeping pets and small children away from the flocking material until it’s had a chance to fully set and dry. I couldn’t find any details online as to whether this particular brand was non-toxic, but I do know that some of the other snow flocks are clearly labeled as safe for pets and kids.

are flocked christmas trees messy?

In short, yes. But, if you do it right, the only messy part is the application. And your tree should stay permanently snow covered for years to come.

WHere to buy flocking powder?

I ordered our snow flock powder on Amazon, which is now sold out in the 2.5 lb box, but I’ve rounded up some similar alternatives below that will work just fine for your DIY flocked Christmas tree.

how do you flock a christmas tree?

I’m really excited to share this process with you, mainly because it’s so ridiculously easy and I know you’ll love it, but also because I made a few mistakes that I don’t want you to repeat. Trust me, you’ll want to read these. The instructions on the package are so simple that they leave out some very important details that will affect how your DIY flocked tree turns out. So are you ready?!

Step 1: Gather your flocking supplies

You really only need a few things to complete this project: a large spray bottle filled with water, a sifting strainer and an outdoor space on a non-windy day if possible. I would not recommend trying this project indoors, it’s entirely too messy and the fine powder will end up everywhere.

STEP 2: Set up and fluff your tree

Make sure you take the time to fully separate and fluff all of the branches on your artificial tree. Not only will this make your tree appear fuller, but it’ll also expose the most branches for maximum snow coverage.

STEP 3: Work in small sections

I really wish I would have known this tip from the beginning. The instructions for applying the snow flock powder simply state that you spray the tree with water and then apply the powder. Simple enough right? Wrong! The flock adhesive is activated by water so it’s not enough to spray your whole tree down and then apply the flock. Most of the water will have dried or evaporated by then. So plan to work through the entire flocking process once small section at a time.

STEP 4: Spray with water

Working in a 12″ section spray enough water on your tree to fully coat your branches, making sure to spray not only the outer branch tips, but inside the tree branches as well.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

STEP 5: Sift your snow flock

There was definitely a learning curve to this step. And hopefully by sharing it with you, you won’t end up with a face full of fake snow powder like I did. You’re welcome.

Just as how you applied your water to your tree working through both the outer and inner branches, you’ll want to do the same when sifting on your snow. Fill your sifter roughly half full of powder and work from the inner section of the branches outward gently shaking your sifter to dispense the snow. You can shake it as gently or as heavily as you’d like depending on how much snow you want to cover the branches.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

*Helpful tip: Use your hands to apply a little extra flock on the branch tips for a realistic clump of snow.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

STEP 6: Seal your tree

Sealing the white flocking powder is crucial to making sure it remains adhered to your Christmas tree. I learned this the hard way when I went to bring my tree indoors and left a nice powdery white trail all through my house. Just like when you prepared the branches for the snow you want to make sure you saturate them with enough water to seal them. You’ll know you’ve done this right when your snowy clumps have dried and hardened and you can give your tree a good shake without powder flying off everywhere.

Once you’ve sealed your tree and allowed it to fully dry you can bring it inside. Although I’d still recommend letting it sit for a day before you attempt to decorate it. Just to make sure all the flocking powder has had a chance to settle and dry.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I’m in love with the new snowy look of our Christmas tree! I could almost leave it undecorated. And if you want to see how we trimmed out this tree last year you can check out that post here.

Last Updated: May 8, 2019 | Published: November 17, 2017 | By: Laura | 23 Comments | Filed Under: Christmas, DIY Projects

  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Get your cozy, wintery Christmas fix by learning how to flock a Christmas tree the easy way! Seriously, so simple and so much cheaper than buying a new, flocked tree. Turn your winter wonderland wishes into a reality with a great DIY solution!How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I seriously love the flocked Christmas tree look. A couple years ago I replaced the small tree in our living room with a flocked Christmas tree and it’s just gorgeous. I adore the snowy, wintery look – especially since it rarely looks like that outside here in Alabama.

There’s nothing sweeter than cozying up on the couch next to the fire, with the Christmas twinkly lights and the look of snow on the tree. Just magical, if you ask me!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Up until last year I have been perfectly happy with our artificial 9-foot slim yuletide pine tree in our dining room in the front window. It’s the perfect size for the room and looks great!

But sometime this fall I started dreaming of a flocked tree in the front window. There’s just something about the vintage look or the rustic charm of the snowy branches. So, I started shopping. But I couldn’t justify purchasing a new tree when we had a perfectly good tree!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Enter the DIY solution. Duh! I really think my love for DIY comes from the fact that I want what I want and will figure out a way to have it even when my budget is limited (or it doesn’t make any sense to get rid of a perfect good tree). LOL

I discovered this awesome DIY flocking powder from a fellow blogger who had used in it her home. I was sold! I ordered the 5 lbs. box of the powder, since my tree is 9 feet tall, and anxiously awaited the 2 days for it to arrive.

I was a little nervous about how messy it would be, but it turns out that it was fine! I’ll walk you through the process. But don’t be intimidated. It’s seriously super easy and would be hard to mess it up!

Tools you need to Flock a Christmas Tree

  1. SnoFlock Decorative Snow Flocking Powder (I bought the 5 lbs. box for my 9 foot tree and used a little more than half of it.)
  2. Kitchen Strainer
  3. Large Spray Bottle (filled with water)
  4. Drop Cloth (or other protective cover)

How to Flock a Christmas Tree

Step 1. Set up your tree. You will want to decide if you want to flock your tree while it’s put up or still in pieces. And you’ll want to designate a place where you can put down a drop cloth. I did mine in my dining room with a drop cloth on the floor, but you may want to do yours in a garage or basement.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I chose to flock my Christmas tree from the bottom up as I was putting it together. This allowed me to get the flocking powder in the middle of the tree and throughout all of the branches. I wanted a full flocked tree. But if you just want to flock the outside edges of your tree, then you can probably just put the whole thing together and then start working.

Step 2. Gather your supplies. Fill the water bottle with water and grab your strainer & flocking powder!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step 3. Liberally mist a section of the tree with water from your spray bottle.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step 4. Fill your strainer half full with flocking powder and gentle shake it over the wet section of the tree. The instructions suggest spray the powder as it falls on the tree, but I didn’t do that. I just sprayed the tree and let the powder fall on it. Just be careful not to spray your sifter, if you do try that! 😊

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step 5. Disperse the “IceFlakes”. There will be some “pre-mixed IceFlakes” left behind in the sifter. They are just shiny pieces that can be added to the tree. I just sprinkled them around. Or if you don’t want those on your tree, just dispose of them.

Step 6. Liberally mist the flocking powder again until it is well saturated, but not dripping wet. I didn’t test this out, I just sprayed it a bunch and saw that it was fluffing up and moved on to the next section.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step 7. Repeat until complete!

Step 8. Allow the flocking to dry completely before adding lights or decorating. I applied the powder at night and it seemed completely dry by the next morning, but I’d let it sit for 24 hours just to be safe.

And that’s it! Your newly flocked tree is now gorgeous and ready to look beautiful in your home all season long!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itGalvanized Tree Collar

A Few Frequently Asked Questions about How to Flock a Christmas Tree:

Q: Is It Messy?

A. While the process of flocking the tree is messy, it’s not terrible. I put a drop cloth under it and it worked great! A tiny bit of fine dust got on the floor, but it came up with a damp cleaning cloth. And once it’s dry, it’s really stuck on there. I moved it off of the drop cloth and hardly anything came off of it. I imagine more will shed as I decorate it, but it seems to adhere very well.

Q: Does it look like a store-bought flocked tree?

A: I think it looks pretty darn close. The only thing that I wish could be better is that the flocking powder adheres really well to the top of the branches, but it’s hard to get it on the bottom of the branches. Looking from the top of the tree down, it looks covered, but looking directly at the tree, it’s a lot less white. My flocked tree from the store has flocking under the branches as well. When I take it down at the end of the season, I might turn each section upside down and flock the underneath side. 😊

Q: Is it safe?

A: In the official instructions that came with the powder, they recommend using a dust mask, gloves and eye protection, although the product is non-toxic and naturally sourced. I didn’t feel the need to use these safety products and it seemed perfectly fine without them. But please use your own judgement.

Let me know if you have any additional questions and I will do my best to answer them.

I absolutely LOVED this product and the results for the price. It’s super pretty and took just a couple hours to give me the look I was going for – at a MUCH cheaper price than buying a new tree. It’s also immensely satisfying to sit there and watch the branches go from regular green to snowy white. So pretty!

What could be more Christmassy than a dusting of snow on your artificial tree

When most people think about buying an artificial Christmas tree plain green immediately comes to mind, but what about trying something a little different and go for a flocked or frosted tree. I know they are not the easiest to decorate but when you get it right they look absolutely stunning. Another disadvantage is that the heavily flocked trees do shed their snow and when you are decorating them don’t wear anything knitted or made of jersey otherwise you’ll end up covered in the flock and it’s very time consuming trying to remove the stuff! The easiest way to remove it from your clothes is to wrap some broad sellotape around your hand with the sticky side out.

Buying a pre-lit tree is so much easier then struggling to light one yourself and getting covered in flock. Most are lit with either warm or cool white LED lights; but the Iceland Fir from The National Tree Company has the biggest array of lights; warm white, multi-coloured and pastel colours. They are also multi-function so you are not just confined to static lights, they will also flash, fade and gently twinkle. If you have a cool palette of decorations then go for the cool white lights and the warm white if using a more neutral natural colour scheme.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itIceland Fir with LED lights on warm white setting

This wintery embellishment can vary from the lightest dusting of frost, such as the Liberty Pine, to the thickest flock as on the Iceland Fir. You can buy aerosol cans of frost or flock to adorn your own fresh or artificial trees and branches. If your old artificial tree looks a bit battered and a new one is just not in the budget then why not revitalise it with a flocking spray; you can cover up most of the worst bald bits. The imperfections that can’t be completely covered can be disguised with some large baubles, bows, floral stems or ornaments, such as an animal head stuffed into the tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itIceland Fir with the lights on the pastel setting

The trick to choosing colours for a flocked tree is not to go for a wide colour palette. One of these trees probably wouldn’t suit someone with an eclectic mix of decorations, such as the children’s hand-made ornaments and oddments collected over a number of years. Choose one main colour and either two secondaries or just one second colour but in different shades. A flocked tree is ideal for a contemporary minimalist colour palette, especially the more sparse realistic trees. This 10’ tree in the header image forms part of the window display in the 2018 Christmas show in store and the only decorations are shatterproof baubles, mainly in blue shades with just a pop of copper to add more interest. Try and avoid clear glass as it always seems to disappear into the tree; you can get away with good quality crystal as it tends to reflect the surrounding colours really well. If you’re going for a three colour palette buy half the decorations in your main colour and a quarter each of the two secondary colours.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itSnowy tree decorated in purple, lilac and white

A snowy tree particularly suits a natural or muted palette of colours but occasionally you can get away with a blast of ‘wow’ colours such as this deep purple and soft lilac decorated 10’ frosty tree on show on the shop floor in 2018. Pairing it with the white ties it to the trees’ frosting. The Iceland tree decorated in red, mint green and white works with the lights on a pastel setting. A natural Scandi inspired design is brought up to date with the use of the pale blue. Instead of a full flocked tree an ordinary green tree, in this case the Vienna Fir, was sprinkled with the iridescent snow in patches to enhance the wintery feel. If you are going to use this loose snow then stand the tree on an old sheet and disguise it with wrapped empty boxes otherwise it will make a horrible mess of the carpet, which will take you ages to clean up when you take down the tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itVienna Fir with snow sprinkled onto the branches

You can buy trees already dressed with natural elements such as cones and berries which means that you don’t have to do as much decorating so would be ideal if you are on a tight budget. This Snowy Dorchester Pine comes with the large cones so would suit decorating with natural wood, berries and leaves. You can also add a snowy element to a plain green tree by spraying fresh branches of foliage, berries, nuts and cones in snow rather than committing to spraying the whole tree. Watch the video on Youtube where Nik shows you how to make a simple star out of willow; she has made a large one to put onto the wall or a door and lighted it with battery operated warm white LEDs, but you could just as easily use the same technique to make small ones for the tree and spray them in snow.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itSnowy Dorchester Pine

If your home is decorated in a contemporary neutral palette then a snowy tree decorated in matching colours would provide a stunning focal point.

Today I’m sharing 23 gorgeous flocked Christmas tree decorating ideas to help you find the perfect inspiration for decorating your own Christmas tree.

I just love a beautiful flocked Christmas tree. I flocked my first Christmas tree seven years ago and I don’t know if I’ll ever be satisfied with a plain green tree again!

Decorating a flocked Christmas tree is a bit different from decorating a regular tree.

Some of the ornaments and decorations that look great on a regular Christmas tree blend right into a flocked tree. and some of the ornaments that just don’t work on a regular tree look amazing on a flocked one.

These flocked tree decorating ideas include a huge variety of trees decorated in all different styles, themes, and colors. There are wintery blue and silver trees, classic farmhouse trees, graphic red and white trees, and gorgeous neutral trees.

It really is amazing how many different ways there are to decorate a Christmas tree!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This post contains affiliate links which means if you make a purchase after clicking a link I will earn a small commission but it won’t cost you a penny more. Click here to see my full disclosure policy.

And if you are looking for the perfect flocked Christmas tree to buy, I just bought this 7.5′ pre-lit flocked tree this year and I’m really happy with it.

And I also put together a post sharing all the best flocked trees I found while researching which tree to buy.

23 Flocked Christmas Tree Decorating Ideas

These beautiful Christmas trees are packed with amazing decorating ideas. Whether you prefer a classic Christmas tree or more of a designer look, there are stunning Christmas decorating ideas here for every style.

Balsam Hill is proud to introduce a line of unique, high-quality home decor focused on rooms and events that bring families together.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Snowy Flocked Christmas Tree

  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Alicia Gavaris

Alicia Gavaris is half of the wife-and-husband duo behind the blog A Burst of Beautiful. She is a designer, specializing in ways to infuse functional, modern-day living with charm and character. Through her blog, she shares creative and inspiring ideas to create a home that’s both beautiful and practical.

A Snowy Flocked Christmas Tree

A serene and magical winter forest is the inspiration for this design. The Frosted Fraser Fir makes a perfect Christmas tree, with its verdant foliage and unique silver luster that resembles a snow-kissed evergreen. The tree is decorated in Alicia’s signature color scheme of white and textured neutrals, plus a little bit of silver and gold to add sparkle and warmth.

Exquisitely handcrafted décor adorns the tree, namely the French Country Ornament Set and Antiqued Snowflake Ornament Set, for a classic and timeless look. Pearl Glitter Picks, reminiscent of iced branches, enhance the elegant winter theme. The tree is topped with a Double-Sided Mirrored Star for a touch of modern brilliance, while the base is covered with a Mongolian Faux Fur Tree Skirt for a warm and cozy feel. Delicate Gold Net Ribbon around the tree was used to bring texture and polish to the look.

This Post May Contain Affiliate Links. Please Read Our Disclosure Policy here

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

T his year for the Michaels’ Dream Tree challenge, my girls and I decided to create a Winter Wonderland tree. Without using flocking or actual snow to make it wintry white, we filled the tree with lots of white fluffy pom poms, big sparkly white poinsettia flowers and fruit and glittery silver and gold ornaments to give the white effect we were after!

If you missed our shopping trip for the theme and tree ornaments, you can find it here.

We really had fun putting the tree together! We have plans to add at least one more Christmas tree this year, I just think it is fun to do more than one. Our favorite “tree tradition” is to go cut down our own fresh tree, so we are looking forward to that!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

One of my favorite things about November is the gentle transitional time between Fall to Christmas. I still get to enjoy Fall, but I enjoy planning ahead to Christmas. While I still have plenty of time left to savor Fall and Thanksgiving, a little advance planning makes Christmas time all the sweeter.

I always seem to get a big burst of creative energy in early November. Do you?

I’m not sure why I do, but I guess it is the impending holidays (deadlines!) and the fun of nesting in colder weather that really motivates me to accomplish a lot around my house. It seems like every November I’m repainting and redecorating something! This year I’m working on decorating three rooms, or maybe four :-). I’ll update you in the upcoming days with my new projects :-).

While I was in a festive and glittery mood, I even did a quick holiday craft last night! I know! Look at me go! I made a Glittery Snow Candle, which you can find here along with instructions to put one together yourself! It was so easy and fun.

Here are some links to some fun and unique Christmas tree themes I’ve had in past years!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Thanks for coming by to see my Winter Wonderland tree!

You can find the other bloggers participating Dream Trees soon on the Michaels Facebook Page! Each of the participants in this challenge was provided a pre-lit tree and a gift card to create their own dream tree. Need more ideas? Michaels Décor Guide has lots of tips and projects to make decorating your house more fun this year. You can see the online version, download a copy, or pick up one at your local Michaels!

Winter weather always looks so pretty on postcards. A blanket of fluffy white snow, icicles hanging from the trees, little woodland creatures scampering about. it’s like a picture straight out of a storybook. But in the real world, after a day or two it usually looks more like this:

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

If you want the beauty of freshly fallen snow without dealing with any grey slush or shoveling, artificial snow (aka flocking) is the way to go—especially when it comes to decorating your tree. You can always buy one that comes with snow on it, but if you already have a tree, flocking it yourself couldn’t be any easier.

Jen over on Epbot made her own flocking with only one ingredient: lightweight spackling.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

She mixed it with a little water to give it an icing consistency, then used a paint brush to put it on. Depending on your technique, you can give your tree a light dusting of snow or put it on in thicker clumps. And the result looks just as good (if not better) than a storebought tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

As long as you let it dry completely, your homemade flocking should stay put for at least a few years. It’s a great way to dress up an inexpensive tree, and if you already have the spackling it doesn’t cost a thing.

Head over to the full tutorial on Epbot for more tips and photos of the process.

Want to master Microsoft Excel and take your work-from-home job prospects to the next level? Jump-start your career with our Premium A-to-Z Microsoft Excel Training Bundle from the new Gadget Hacks Shop and get lifetime access to more than 40 hours of Basic to Advanced instruction on functions, formula, tools, and more.

Last Updated: November 7, 2019 | Published: November 6, 2019 | By: Laura | 1 Comment | Filed Under: Christmas, Home Decor

  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

One of the best things about Christmas is decorating the Christmas tree! Whether or not you decorate a tree with collected family ornaments or with a fun wintery theme, the flocked tree is a perfect backdrop to your decor. Over the years the flocked tree has grown in popularity because what’s not to like? The white, fluffy flocking looks so much like snow and what’s more Christmas-y than snow!?

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience. See my full disclosure policy here.

I love these inexpensive flocked trees here. And then if you have a green tree without flocking and want to flock it yourself, I have a tutorial for you here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

The Most Beautiful White Flocked Christmas Trees

Take a look at some of my favorite flocked Christmas trees around the internet. All of these women who decorated these trees are super talented, so be sure to click through and check out alllllll of their holiday decor! 😊

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Lucy at Craftberry Bush found the perfect combination of snowy goodness when she added the extra “snow” on the branches to make it look more heavily flocked. Although it’s not really flocking at all. Check out how she made the tree full of “snow” here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

In 2017 I flocked my own tree and decorated with gorgeous wooden sign ornaments, cotton stems, lamb’s ear, wooden bead garland and other natural elements. I LOVED it!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Liz Marie didn’t even need to decorate her flocked trees, because they are so beautiful bare. I have a “naked” flocked tree in my bedroom this year and I LOVE it! Find my favorite inexpensive flocked trees here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Sarah at Life on Virginia Street has some of the most gorgeous coastal decor without being overtly nautical. She’s one of my favorite bloggers and a sweet friend! Check out her 2018 Christmas home tour here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

All of the gorgeous blush and metallics make this such a beautiful tree.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This forest of flocked trees creates a winter wonderland that transitions perfectly from Christmas to winter decor!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Don’t you just love all of those beautifully decorated (or undecorated) trees? They are my favorites! I hope you’re as inspired as I am!

Where to Buy the BEST Pre-Lit Flocked Christmas Trees

Now, let’s chat about some of the the best pre-lit flocked Christmas trees out there. Just in case you’re trying to find one to decorate your beautiful your home.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I have several of these inexpensive flocked trees in my home. I have both the 7.5 ft, 6.5 ft and 4 ft. sizes and always want to go back for more so that I can create a winter wonderland in my home. They have sturdy tree stands and hinged branches for easy set up and take down!

I have the pre-lit Christmas tree versions, which I love. While I don’t normally love a pre-lit tree, these are necessary. I love how the flocking it on the lights as well as the branches and keeps them camouflaged in the tree. If I were to add white led lights to a pre-flocked tree, the lights wouldn’t blend in as well, I don’t think.

What is a Flocked Christmas Tree?

The history of flocking dates back as early as the 1800’s when people used flour, corn starch or cotton to give their real Christmas trees a snowy appearance. The trend became very popular in the 1950’s and 60’s when home flocking kits were popular.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Flocking literally means attaching tiny fibers to a surface to create texture. It can be attached to any surface, not just trees. The appearance of the fibers create a snow-like textured effect. The actual flocking materials today include paper pulp such as fiber, corn starch as adhesive, and boron as a flame retardant.

And if you try, like me, to flock your own tree, it’s a white powder that if sifted over the tree branches and adheres when it comes in contact with water. You can read all about how I DIY’d my flocked tree here.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

After a couple of years, I donated this tree because the homemade flocking kit shed so much more than the trees that you buy already flocked. So, I’ve decided to stick with pre-flocked Christmas trees going forward!

December 24, 2012 by Ella

LET IT SNOW. LET IT SNOW. LET IT SNOW!

No snow on Christmas? Oh that can’t be…!

I have an exciting tutorial here for you that will make your Christmas wish come true… yes, you can have snow for Christmas!

Want to know how to make Artificial Snow?

Here are 3 eco-friendly DIY recipes to make artificial snow in less than 3 minutes from ingredients you already have at home:

#1 Artificial Snow from Paper Towels

Ingredients : about 10 sheets of damp paper towel sheets
Directions : mix in a food processor until small little pieces form

#2 Artificial Snow from Sea Salt

Ingredients : coarse sea salt
Directions : sprinkle anywhere you wish
food safe and actually edible – great for tabletop displays where it touches food

#3 Artificial Snow from Baking Soda (Baking Soda Snow)

Ingredients : 1 cup of baking soda
Directions : add to a bowl, and drop in 1 tablespoon of water at a time, mix well with a fork. Continue adding one tablespoon of water at a time, mixing in between until a ‘snow’ consistency forms.

My personal favourite recipe(s) was to actually combine the Artificial Snow from Paper Towels with the Baking Soda Snow – together it was just the perfect fluffiness on top with close-to-real small particles of snow all around 😉 The Sea Salt Snow could also work well… but I am personally not a fan of using food (good food) as a decoration. (it’s kind of like throwing food away). But I suppose this is still a lot better than using artificial plastic that is definitely NOT eco-friendly and will just sit in the landfill with its toxins.

Now you can fully enjoy the holidays with some fun snow around!
The kids will be thrilled! (mine totally was ;)) Actually it was the little one who’s idea it was to make our own snow.

After popping into a few stores last week to pick up some artificial snow – we were devastated to hear that it was all sold out! We’ve had this cute DIY project in mind and just needed snow desperately…
With all our supplies already out… I had to explain to Miss G that we just won’t get snow in time… “Oh no….” (she said with those sad cute eyes) (but just then her little eyes lit up!) “But mom…. I know…. WE CAN MAKE OUR OWN SNOW!”

And just then, the very creative and determined little one ran off…. and came back just a minute later holding two squares of toilet paper! Ha! She excitedly started tearing it into tiniest little shreds! “Wow.. you’re onto something here!” I smiled 😉 She really was! I loved how creative and inventive she got! Didn’t take No for an answer and proceeded to CREATE HER OWN SNOW!

I then plugged in the food processor and took her idea into mass production! 😉

Well… that ladies and gentlemen is how the best ideas form – and it may be just paper snow to you! But it’s the most wonderful creative and inventive snow I’ve ever seen 😉
We then had some fun and experimented with the other two items

she gave the final approval of our closest-to-the-original-snow Snow!

And just why was this snow so important to us… well so that we could finish off our own DIY Anthropologie inspired Mason Jar Snow Globes of course! (my own tutorial will have to come a little later

great for next Christmas!)

Wishing you a wonderful Holiday

filled with love, magic, happiness and now…. snow!

Create your own magical, snow-laden Christmas tree in this easy step-by-step acrylic painting tutorial for beginners

Queen Bees! We are painting this cute and easy snowy Christmas tree in a forest using acrylic paints on canvas. This is perfect to hang up in your house as part of your Christmas decor or to give as a gift to a friend.

👉Want to use this tutorial for your next DIY paint party? Here’s what you’ll need to get started!

Some items mentioned below are affiliate links which come at NO extra cost to you, my darling Queen Bees! If you wish to support this channel and send me an extra thank you, be sure to use the links above! I hope you love these products as much as I do!

PAINTING SUPPLIES YOU’LL NEED

  • 11″x14″ Canvas
  • Cup of water
  • Towel
  • Tablecloth
  • palette/palette paper

Brushes

  • ¾” Flat Wash Brush
  • #10 Flat Shader
  • #10 Filbert
  • #0 Detail Round

Paints Used

  • Mars Black Acrylic Paint
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Prussian Green
  • Titanium White

Christmas Tree Step By Step Tutorial for Beginners

Step 1: Paint the Background

With a flat wash brush, load your brush with a combination of ultramarine blue with a tiny bit of titanium white and create vertical strokes starting from the top of the canvas and ending almost 2/3 of the way down.

Once you lay down your first layer, mix ultramarine blue with a tiny hint of mars black to create a darker shade of blue. Then repeat the vertical strokes onto the canvas, with a heavy bias towards the right and left-most sides of the canvas. You’ll want to leave the center of the canvas a light blue to create a focal point when we add our tree later.

Staying with the flat wash brush, add a bit of white to the center and begin blending the dark blue with the newly added white. Keep your brush strokes light and angled to the side to help create a smoother blend.

Flat brushes are fantastic tools to help you create sharp, straight lines with little effort. I usually like to get my #10 shader brush which is perfect for a 11×14″ canvas.

Step 2: Add and Blend Gradients in the Snow

Using a filbert brush, add a few dots of ultramarine blue inside the “snow” portion to begin creating shadows. You don’t need very much of the blue, so don’t worry about going too nuts on this part. Wash your brush and load it with titanium white and create a series of “curved” lines along the border of the background with the snow area of the canvas. Be sure to carry the white into the blue portions in the snow to help with blending. Note: make sure your paint is nice and wet when blending.

Once you have a nicely blending area, it’s time to do a bit of stippling/dry brushing. Using titanium white, be sure your filbert brush is barely loaded with the paint; this helps keep your strokes transparent and not solid, which is perfect for snow flurries. Tap your brush on its flat side along the border of sky to the snow as well as along the entire snow area of the canvas. This creates a smoother, snow-laden hazy dream-scape.

Step 3: Paint in the background trees

It’s time to create the group of trees in the background of the Christmas tree. Grab your shader brush and load it with mars black. Using the tip, create a straight vertical line from the tip of the future tree to the base. This will be your tree’s foundation and trunk. If you want to create a thicker trunk, simply use the flat side of your brush when painting your lines.

Choose one side to begin creating trees and work your way through. Create the first tree 3-4 inches from the side of the canvas as a good rule of thumb.

To create the tree branches, use the tip of your shader brush and create a line that comes out tangentially from the tree trunk. Basically aim to paint a “Y” shape every time you create a branch. Repeat creating trunks and branches, ideally 4 large trees, 2 on either side.

To create the more “faded” trees in the background, be sure to remove as much paint off your brush to create another dry-brush effect. Create a few vertical strokes on both sides of the canvas, using light pressure, avoiding the center. Then, using your flat wash brush, lightly brush titanium white over the background trees to create a “faded” aesthetic.

Step 4: Add in the Main Christmas Tree

Using the tip of your shader brush loaded with green paint, create a straight vertical line from the tip of the future tree to the base. This will be your tree’s foundation and trunk.

Now it’s time to build the leaves. When it comes to fir trees, think fluffy. Coniferous trees, from a distance, appear to have that furry quality about them, and that can be done with many strokes applied in similar orientations. Create right curved strokes for the right side of the tree and left curved strokes for the left side of the tree. Keep repeating this over and over until your tree is filled in.

So, using your shader brush, turn your brush at an angle from the vertical line, and create a series of lines emanating from the vertical line, all of which eventually create an umbrella effect. This means that the tip of your tree is tinier than the midsection of your tree which is smaller than the very bottom of your tree.

Step 5: Add the Snow on the Branches

Now that you have the branches established, it’s time to add the snow on top of them. When creating your snow, think about how snow collects on the branches, which is usually on top of the established bough. Using a shader brush tip and titanium white, follow the same directions as the branches, going down each layer of the tree, building your snow layers as you go.

As a cool finishing effect, using the flat side of your shader brush and create larger brush strokes, varying the orientations along the middle of the Christmas tree.

Step 6: Add Snowflakes

For the final step, it’s time to add some magical snowflakes to really seal in the Christmas magic. Mixing titanium white with a good deal of water, use a latex-gloved hand or brush to flick tiny, spontaneous specks onto the background and all along the tree. Make sure to add more specks along the edges of the canvas as well as on the snow. You’ll notice how much your painting will instantly change right before your eyes.

bonus tip: Turn your canvas on its side and continue the snow flake “flicking”, so it looks like a sweet little blizzard encompassing the entire scene and canvas.

Step 7: Ogle and Admire Your Work

And there you have it, a beautiful snow-laden Christmas tree forest scene that will send you all those instant holiday good feels. Can you imagine yourself walking through this forest scene and seeing a tree just like this?

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

December 1, 2021

What is a flocked Christmas tree?

Ever wonder how some Christmas trees look like they belong in a snow-covered winter wonderland? Flocking your Christmas tree gives it the same effect. It refers to the process of painting your tree, displaying the illusion that it belongs in a snow-dusted, magical winter forest.

Have an old out-dated artificial tree that needs an update? A flocked tree is the perfect solution. Continue reading to learn how to flock your own Christmas tree without making a mess!

Step One: Gather Materials

  • Artificial Christmas tree
  • Faux paint snow- we used Santa Snow Spray
  • Surface Protection- we used Trimaco’s X•Paper® and secured it down with Trimaco’s Easy Mask® KleenEdge® PerfectEdge™ Tape
  • Plastic sheetings to cover any furniture, such as Trimaco’s Cling Cover®
  • Protective wear
  • Rags to wipe down your stand and any messes!

Step Two: Prep your space

Although the Santa Snow Spray says it produces no overspray, we noticed it does just a bit. We recommend putting down a drop cloth, or surface protection paper to ensure it doesn’t mess up your floor.

As an additional cautious step, we also threw some masking film over the couch, and put on coveralls to protect our clothes. Better safe than sorry!

Step Three: Clean your branches

If you’re working with an older tree that’s been in storage, we recommend cleaning off the branches to remove any dust particles. Use wet microfiber rag and lightly dust!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Step Four: Flock it

It’s time to flock. Starting from the bottom, begin slowly and evenly spraying your tree. To give it the full “snow effect”, we sprayed at a downward angle and topped the edges off with additional spray. Make your way around and up the tree in a spiral pattern.

Step Five: Wipe down you stand

The Santa Snow Spray will most likely get on your metal stand. If this happens, don’t fret. Simply take a damp microfiber rag and wipe the artificial snow off.

Step Six: Let your tree dry

Once your tree is lightly dusted to your liking, make sure you let it dry before moving it. It’ll take roughly 2-3 hours for the spray to completely dry. Move your tree into place, and decorate!

How to flock a Christmas tree?

Some of you may not even know what a flocked Christmas tree is…and that’s ok.

WHAT IS A FLOCKED CHRISTMAS TREE?

Flocked Christmas trees are basically Christmas trees with artificial snow on them.

Flocked Christmas trees are filling stores everywhere and if you look at magazines or home décor accounts on Instagram, you are bound to see the beautiful flocked Christmas trees that look like they have a touch of snow on them.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

HOW TO FLOCK A CHRISTMAS TREE

This page may contain affiliate links for your shopping convenience. The links help support the blog as we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you, our readers. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

You can purchase flocked Christmas trees, and you can even purchase artificial flock that just requires you to spray on water and then add the faux flock.

But what if you want to flock a Christmas tree using stuff you have at home?

I need to stick to a budget, so I wanted to try flock a Christmas tree using what I had.

My daughters and I looked through our supplies and then began our fun little project.

I shared it on Instagram and so many people loved it and wanted to know how I did it, so I decided to write this post in case any of you want to give it a try!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

SUPPLIES NEEDED TO FLOCK A CHRISTMAS TREE

  • Old paper or sheets to protect your workspace
  • An old pail to mix the flocking in
  • Gloves to protect your hands
  • Small artificial Christmas trees
  • White Glue
  • Corn Starch
  • Shaving Cream (not gel)
  • Artificial shredded snow (mine is from the dollar store)

First, spray your shaving cream into the pail until you have approximately 2 -3 cups of foam.

Next, pour in approximately 1 cup of white glue and then pour in about 1 cup of cornstarch.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Since I was wearing plastic gloves, I just mixed up the flocking mixture with my hands until combined.

Next, I started at the top of my little artificial Christmas tree and put on the mixture from top to bottom on the tree using my hands.

I did not focus on the underside of branches as I wanted it to look like the snow had just fallen on top of the trees.

My daughters wore gloves and each flocked a few trees too. We had enough flocking to flock 4 medium trees (approx. 18” – 20”) and 4 small trees (approx. 12”).

I should mention that I did not measure anything exact, and I’ve made it twice – both times it worked out perfectly.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Once I had it how I liked I used the bag of shredded snow and sprinkled it on top of the wet flocking. I was holding the tree and rotating it and moving it side to side to get the snow to stick somewhat evenly.

Then I gently shook off the tree to drop any of the artificial snow that didn’t stick and then I set the tree on the paper to dry.

If you want to see flocking in action, check out our Instagram highlight story “Flocking Trees”.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE FOR FLOCKING TO DRY?

I let them dry for about 2 hours before I moved them to where I wanted them.

I knew they would not be touched where I was putting them, so that worked out well. I would say it takes at least 12 hours to dry fully. The flocking dries so well and looks absolutely beautiful and it surprisingly stays on the branches quite nicely!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I am so happy that I decided to flock a Christmas tree using stuff I had at home.

The trees are pictured with some DIY Chalkboard art I did.

You can see more photos on our Instagram account.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Sign-up to get an email update each day. Also connect with us on:

Snow covered trees, wreaths and branches…..just magical. Don’t you agree?
Did you know you can get that very same look yourself? DIY snow flocking is the way to go for your very own magical holiday decor.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Once you learn about DIY snow flocking, you’ll want to flock it all! 🙂

I know it’s only Halloween but it’s never too soon to start preparing for the big holiday!
And if you want to do any DIY snow flocking, it’s best to get it going ahead of time.

I did my tree a couple years ago and it’s just so pretty, I couldn’t stop at the tree. I wanted to flock it all!
If you are new here, be sure to hop on over and see the sad little thrift store tree that I turned into a magical Christmas treasure with this DIY snow flocking stuff. 😉 It’s a keeper, for sure.

Besides the tree, I also made these plain wreaths I picked up at Lowe’s (15% off, so around $10 each)
I used an old swag (pulled apart) that I bought at the thrift store last year for a few dollars to decorate them with.
Thrifty, thrifty!!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Just plain old wreaths. Nothing fancy about them.

I’ve included affiliate links below for your convenience. Full disclosure info is here.

MATERIALS LIST: (click the links below to purchase the items)

Sno-Flock (premium artificial decorative self-adhesive snow flock powder with ice flakes)
Elmer’s Glue All
Sifter
Spray Bottle

I simply used some hot glue and the pieces from the swag I pulled apart in and around the wreath.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Then I sprayed them with the DIY snow flocking. (see this post for all the details)

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I added a pretty, sparkly ribbon but you could leave that off.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I wanted to flock everything then.
Snowy goodness.

Things like the artificial greenery I usually have out….

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

And I always use the left over branches from our real tree to decorate with….so I gave them some DIY snow flocking too!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

Doesn’t that look like real snow?

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

I really does and just makes everything looks like a magical, snowy wonderland.
I still have a bunch of the snow flocking left over so I know I’ll be at it again this year!
Nothing is safe from me and the snow flock, I tell ya! 😉
I just love it.

Like this easy DIY snow flocking? PIN it to save it!

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

If you haven’t yet visited my post “DIY Flocked Tree“, pop on over there to see how I turned this old thrift store tree into a snow flocked beauty!

Click HERE to see it AND a few more helpful tips I have on applying this Sno Flock!

Sharing is caring!

  • Pin
  • Share
  • Tweet

Make designing your dream room a breeze with my Printable Room Planner.

Learn how to make a DIY flocked Christmas tree. Check out the fully decked out tree in my Christmas home tour.

Flocking a Christmas tree is a great way to add a snowy look or even give an old tree new life.

How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

This post contains affiliate links. By purchasing an item through an affiliate link, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

I love white Christmas trees, but they can yellow when stored in a hot attic. Guess where I store my Christmas decor? Yep.

Although the tree was pretty yellow when I brought it down, I was determined to get another year out of it. I hate the thought of it going into a landfill.

So I decided to flock my white Christmas tree to give it some new life and I love the results.

When I was growing up, the only way that you could flock a tree came out of a can! This method is a bit easier and a lot less toxic.

DIY Flocked Christmas Tree

Supplies Needed

  • Christmas Tree
  • Snow Flock (I bought the 5 lb bag, but 2 lbs would have been enough for my 6′ tree)
  • Spray bottle
  • Kitchen Strainer*
  • Drop cloth

*Don’t use your kitchen strainer for this. I used a large, inexpensive strainer that I bought specifically for this project.

Prep Work for Flocking a Tree

There’s no need to remove the lights from your tree. Just make sure that it’s not plugged in and try not to cover the ends of the cords with flocking.

Let dry completely before plugging the lights in.

Test the lights to make sure they work beforehand, but be sure to unplug the cord from the wall.

  1. Protect your work area. I used a drop cloth folded in half, but I should have laid out the whole thing. This process makes a larger mess than I thought it would.
  2. If your tree comes in pieces, do each piece separately. Start with the bottom. Set it up as normal and fluff out the branches. How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

How to Flock a Christmas Tree

  1. Use a spray bottle to spray the tree with water. I worked in small sections to make sure that the area I was working in stayed wet. How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  2. Use the strainer to sift flocking onto the limbs while the branches are wet. (I found it easiest to use a cup to scoop the flocking into the strainer.) How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  3. Move the strainer around to cover the branches. Each time you empty the strainer, you will have bits of shiny “snow” left. Use your hands to sprinkle those bits onto the tree.
  4. Spray more water on top of the flocking as you go. The water activates the adhesive to make the snow flock stick to the tree and to itself. How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  5. Keep alternating the spraying and flocking until the bottom part of the tree is thick enough.

Lift branches if necessary to get full coverage.

  • Continue this process for the rest of the tree, remembering to spread the branches out as you assemble the tree.
  • The top is tricky, because the flocking sticks to the top of the branches (like snow). However, you can’t see the tops of the branches so the top part looks unfinished.

    I did as best as I could using the strainer, but after that, I sprayed those branches again and dabbed snow on the underneath of the branches using my hands. It goes on thick, but it works.

  • When you’re finished, spray the tree once last time. If you shake it and flocking falls off, the tree needs to be sprayed with more water. How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it
  • Tips for a DIY Flocked Christmas Tree

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    • This process is *much* messier than you think it will be. Don’t bother cleaning beforehand. And use a large tarp.
    • Wear old clothes while working.
    • Your shoes will be a bit slippery after this process, so be careful.
    • If you’re prone to lung irritation, wear a mask. You’re breathing the powder in.
    • Same for skin irritation. Wear gloves if needed.
    • Be heavy handed with the flocking for thicker looking snow.
    • This process is really easy, but it takes a while to get full coverage.
    • If you need to, add a second coat of flocking after the 1st one dries.
    • Any type of breeze spreads the snow more. Including the air from the heater.
    • The snow flock can be cleaned with a mop if it gets on the floor.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    When the tree was dry, I added about 8 stands of white tinsel to the tree as well.

    This is a good way to fluff up a wimpy, fake tree.

    I love my DIY flocked Christmas tree!

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    This tree would look great with this retro tree topper!

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    My most favorite part of Christmas is picking out and decorating our Christmas tree! After we spent a Christmas in Colorado, I fell in love with real, snow covered trees! They are so stunning and just happened to fit in with my white home decor. Ever since I learned about flocking trees, we have always had one! The best part is, you can easily have one, too! Flocking works on artificial or live trees and you just need a few things to get this look!

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    SUPPLIES NEEDED TO FLOCK YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE

    1. Plastic drop cloth (trust me) and you may want to do this in your garage or outside.
    2. Flock! Get the real deal. 2lbs covers a 7-8 foot tree. I like heavy flock so I get a little more.
    3. High quality sifter or strainer. Don’t go cheap on this one.
    4. High quality spray bottle. Again, get a good one and I like having 2 if someone helps me with this process.
    5. Spray snow for afterwards. I use it for touchups and to thicken some areas up.

    HOW TO FLOCK YOUR TREE

    STEP 1: Prepare! Put down drop cloth, fill spray bottles with water, and get your sifter or strainer ready.

    STEP 2: Start at the top of your tree and work your way down. The flock will fall (like real snow) so it gives better coverage.

    STEP 3: Spray a section of your tree with water so its damp. Then sift flock or tap the strainer with flock in it over the damp areas. Add more flock at this time if you want a heavier look.

    STEP 4: Spray water over the flocked area. You don’t want it too wet but just lightly spray. I like to spray water while shaking the flock on or have a second person spray water as you flock. I think you get a better stick when you combine spraying the water and flock. Imagine your sifting powdered sugar over a cake, you spray water, sift the flock, and seal it once more with water. SPRAY WATER then FLOCK + SPRAY WATER.

    STEP 5: Repeat! You will see the snow building up! Let it try for anywhere from 8 to 24 hours depending on how big your tree is and how much flock you’ve used.

    After I flock my tree and let it dry, I use the spray snow and spray some areas to thicken it up and create the look of a heavy layer of snow. I have used about 5 cans of snow spray on my current tree and love the look! You can also flock wreaths, garlands, or any other branches!

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    1. Is it Messy? YES. But worth it! Use the drop cloth!
    2. Can I add lights to it? YES! I have done it before and after flocking, both are fine but after is a little messier. I love these lights! White with an easy to hide strand!
    3. Can I use a fake tree to flock? YES! and you can save it for the following years and add more flock as needed!
    4. How long does this take? Usually about an hour or so. I flock the entire tree, then do a heavy coat on the front that is more visible.
    5. Is it safe? Yes, it is environmentally safe and it dries so it doesn’t come off on children or pets unless you really try.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    Artificially Flocked and Beautiful Trees

    For those that want that beautiful, snow covered tree without the hassle, you can buy amazing artificial trees that come flocked! The good news is, you can always add more flock to them or spray them with the snow spray. Here are my top finds!

    This post contains affiliate links which cost you nothing but may provide me with a small commission.

    Have you seen some of these beautifully flocked trees in magazines and on Pinterest? Have you seen the price tags on them? They can be quite expensive! I did a tabletop tree in our family room that I was planning on doing minimal decorations and thought flocking would be a great way to make the tree more special.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    So away I went looking for flocking. There’s the stuff in the can and then there’s SnoFlock. Countless tutorials on Pinterest raved about SnoFlock and the results are gorgeous! When this idea came to me at the very end of November, I started looking for SnoFlock. Either it was sold out, not available to ship immediately, or had an incredible mark up in price. So I needed a plan B. My friend is a florist and I asked for her recommendations. She told the stuff in the can is extremely messy so it was back to the drawing board for a plan C. That’s when I saw a YouTube video using spray paint and the stuff of every 80’s woman’s dream….popcorn ceiling spray! You can actually buy it an a spray can for patching purposes and that’s exactly what I did!

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    • White spray paint
    • Wall Texture Spray – I used Homax Orange Peel Wall Texture Spray
    • Epsom Salt
    • Cardboard or plastic
    • Artificial Tree – I used this 3 foot tree from Target
    1. Prep whatever you are going to flock. I used a small tabletop Christmas tree so I fluffed all of the branches and set it up on a stand. Since the weather is cold, I worked in our little shed. You will want to use cardboard or plastic to protect the floor. If you would like, wrap the tree stand in plastic.
    2. Visually segment the tree vertically and begin to spray the tree with white spray paint beginning at the top and working your way down within the vertical segment. Concentrate more on the tips of the branches as that is how snow falls. Move your way around the tree. Lightly cover the tree for a lighter snow fall effect or more thoroughly cover the tree for a heavier snow fall look.
    3. Follow the directions on the can of texture spray to properly mix. Using the same technique of vertically dividing the tree into segments, begin spraying the wall texture on the first segment of the tree. Use more if you desire a heavier snow fall effect. Sprinkle with Epsom salts for an icy like texture and sparkle. Following the same steps, move your way around the tree until complete.
    4. Allow to dry thoroughly or overnight.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    And that’s it! I used this on an artificial wreath and a small 3 1/2 foot tree and I still have a ton of the wall texture spray left. I just might start flocking everything!

    The wreath that I flocked is on our back door which we use constantly and I notice very little of the flocking coming off of the wreath so once it’s done, this method of flocking isn’t very messy. You can also completely skip the Epsom salt portion but I just really like the texture and little bit of sparkle it added to the tree.

    By Jesse Lam

    Enhance Trees from Ordinary to Extraordinary

    With Christmas just around the bend, most of us want to find that stunning tree—and even show it off for all the world to see. While some might be confidently rushing to get the trendiest, most eye-catching Christmas décor, there are others who might be staring at their naked tree and asking: How can I get creative this year? Or: How can I at least just decorate it differently than last year?

    We understand the struggle, so here are some Top Trends that might inspire some ideas on how to turn your tree from Ordinary to Extraordinary.

    Trend 1: Emerald Green is IN

    Emerald Green is one of the hottest color themes this year, providing that ‘this-just-feels-so-right’ balance of modern and traditional. It’s a color scheme that works well with both green and snowy trees.

    For green trees, consider pairing emerald, green ornaments with gold and glass décor for a perfect match. With warm white lights and gold ribbons, this tree will look sleek and elegant anywhere.

    Fun tip – The emerald green décor also pops when you place it with white flocked branches. Add warm white lights to give off a nice natural contrast with the blend of white and green.

    Trend 2: Faux snow indoors

    Have you ever taken a stroll during a peaceful snowfall, and wished you could bring a snow-capped tree home? With flock, you can bring the snow indoors (without the cold)!

    Pre-flocked trees give holiday enthusiasts a beautiful snow-covered tree—without the hassle. It’s a gorgeous white contrast that can make any décor pop.

    For a more DIY approach, there are still easy ways to cloak your tree in white. While you can buy self-adhesive snow flock, you can also opt for cotton—it’s a great alternative for faux snow. Flocking is a beautiful way to create a home winter wonderland.

    A white Christmas can be more than just a dream with a flocked tree. A tall evergreen dusted with a blanket of faux snow helps turn the living room into a winter wonderland. Flocking refers to the artificial white powder that’s applied to a Christmas tree’s bare branches. Create this popular look yourself with store-bought sprays or powders that can be used on real and artificial trees, or buy a faux one that’s already been flocked.

    Flocked trees probably bring back memories of old-fashioned Christmases your mother or grandmother may have had one twinkling in her living room window at one point or another. This wintry look for Tannenbaums became popular around the mid-1900s, when glittery tinsel and metallic ornaments also took off as all-the-rage Christmas tree decorations. However, people were adding snowy touches to their Fraser firs way before then with pantry staples like flour and cornstarch. Flocked trees bring the holiday magic of a snowy evergreen forest indoors, and the trend is clearly here to stay.

    Flocking is an easy way to give your Christmas tree a whole new look. By doing it yourself, you can have more control over how much “snow” sits on the branches. Buy flocking spray-paint (like Santa Spray Snow, $5; thehomedepot.com) or powder (like SnoFlock Genuine Original Snow Flocking Powder, $23; seasonsreflection.com) to apply to a real or synthetic tree. Follow these eight easy steps for flocking your own Christmas tree here.

    Or splurge on a tree that’s already flocked. Bring it to life with festive decorations like metallic ornaments, colorful garlands, and bright lights. Top off your twinkling Tannenbaum with a shining star or a big bow with cascading ribbon. Shop of few of our favorite flocked Christmas trees below.

    Related Articles

    Save money by making your own fake snow to use as Christmas tree decorations, wreaths or for other winter decorating projects. Artificial snow is available wherever craft supplies are sold, but it is usually packaged in small jars with hefty price tags. If you don’t want to buy a Christmas tree flocking kit, you can mix your own snow for pennies. You won’t need any special ingredients other than a couple of pieces of expanded polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, and the items in your craft supply stash.

    Use Foam Balls

    Place a 2-inch foam ball, available at craft and big box stores, on a kitchen cutting board. Cut the ball in half using a serrated knife in a back-and-forth sawing motion as if you’re cutting a tomato in half. You do not need to measure and mark the ball before cutting; the halves don’t need to be exact. Don’t worry if the ball crumbles a bit.

    Let It Snow

    Working over a paper plate, rub the two halves of the ball together in a sanding motion, causing flakes of foam to shower down onto the plate. Pour the flakes into a measuring cup and add any crumbles created when you cut the ball in half. Continue to rub and flake until you have a 1/2 cup of foam flakes. Place the remainder of the ball and any extra flakes in a resealable sandwich bag for future crafts projects.

    Add Craft Glue

    Pour the 1/2 cup of foam flakes into a small mixing bowl. Add 1/4 cup of white craft glue and 2 tablespoons of white acrylic craft paint. Mix the ingredients together using a spoon. White craft glue is a water-based adhesive that’s easy to clean up if spilled.

    Apply The Fake Snow

    Apply the DIY fake snow for crafts to your decorations, Christmas tree or wreath using a craft stick or hard-bristled artist’s brush, such as a child’s plastic paintbrush, before it hardens. Stroke or dab the thick snow as desired. Allow the wet snow to dry. Note: Thicker applications will take several hours to harden and dry completely.

    Paint The Snow

    Use a paint that does not have solvents like benzene or toluene because they may dissolve the Styrofoam if you want to dress up your snow with a little color. Acrylic and tempera paints, readily available at art and craft stores, are your best bet. For the longest-lasting finish, apply a sealant to the snow and let it dry before painting.

    Transform your home into a winter wonderland with a flocked artificial Christmas tree from Fraser Hill Farm. Available in a variety of sizes and styles, these snowy trees deliver the ideal winter aesthetic for any decorating preference. Whether you’re looking for a realistic snow-flocked pine or a vibrant tree with pre-strung multi-colored LED lights, Fraser Hill Farm delivers durability and style for holidays to come. Constructed with either PVC or PE needles, these trees ensure a realistic appearance without the hassle of chopping down a natural tree each year.

    Sign Up & Save

    Sign up for our newsletter and receive 20% off your first order.

    About Fraser Hill Farm

    Your one-stop shop for all things holiday! Holidays are meant for celebrating, being around loved ones and making them uniquely yours with decorations that meet your style. We believe you should be able to browse a wide assortment of decor anytime of the year. From seriously scary Halloween decor, festive Christmas trimmings, cheerful Easter decor and everything in between, we’ve got you covered.

    Company
    • Why Fraser Hill Farm?
    • FAQs
    • Reviews
    • Blog
    • Returns
    • Warranty
    Say Hello

    © 2022 Fraser Hill Farm | All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | Built by DigitlHaus

    It’s the most sought-after Christmas tree in all the land, and desperate mums are turning to DIY to replicate the elusive Target ‘Snowy Aspen’ tree.

    The Scandi-inspired tree has been causing havoc around the country and on the Target Mums Australia Facebook page.

    In recent years desperate people have turned to eBay, where the wintry tree — which retails for $59 — was being flogged for three times the price.

    But if you’re still struggling to get your hands on one, there’s a much easier option than trying to hunt one down.

    One clever mum has DIY’d her own Snowy Aspen using just shaving cream, glue and corn flour.

    Taking to Facebook, she detailed how she made her own flocking using a can of shaving cream, a bottle of Elmer’s White Glue and three-quarters of a cup of corn flour — all available from the supermarket for under $10.

    “Mix all three ingredients together then you’ve got your ‘snow’, then, wearing gloves, rub the snow onto the individual branches of your tree, adding more or less depending on how white you’d like,” she explained alongside pics showing the tree before and after.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itFrom traditional green to a tree plucked out of a winter wonderland. (Facebook)

    She added that she used two batches of the mixture for the green tree she bought from Target, which is 180cm.

    “That is dedication, you’re very clever,” one commentator wrote on the post. “I love your tree!”

    Others wondered why she didn’t just use snow in a can but one commentator replied and explained snow in a can is a “disaster. It goes everywhere! And it doesn’t stick to the tree and every time we bump the tree or move it, the snow falls all over the floor”.

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking itThe finished product. (Facebook)

    Some posters worried about the damp corn flour attracting mould and moths, but the original poster said the glue dries it quite well and it shouldn’t be a worry.

    One commentator suggested adding glitter to the mix to add a bit more glitz and glamour to the tree.

    The clever hacker said she was “absolutely in love” when she uploaded a pic of the finished tree decked out in lights and decorations.

    “It was all worth it, now I’m just wishing I could keep it up all year round.”

    With the holidays nearly here, it’s the perfect time to decorate your home and make it as festive as possible. From ornaments to lights, a Christmas tree is a great way to get the whole family in the spirit and to make your home look fabulous. A flocked Christmas tree is an even better twist on a classic holiday staple, so why not use your DIY skills to create one? Read the full tutorial below and you’ll be on your way to a winter wonderland within the comfort of your own home.

    What’s a Flocked Christmas Tree?

    You may be asking yourself, “What is a flocked Christmas tree?” You’ve likely seen them many times. These trees look like they’re covered in snow or frosted. Tree flocking dates back to the 1800s, when those going for this look used substances like flour or cotton to get the desired aesthetic. The look really caught on in the late 1950s and 1960s. If you’ve ever pined for a white Christmas, a flocked tree is the perfect way to get just that—only inside four walls.

    How to Flock Your Christmas Tree – Method One: Soap Shavings

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    The use of soap shavings to give your tree a snow-kissed look is a traditional way to go about it. It’s also economically friendly. Use a gentle soap such as the brand Ivory in order to keep the fragrance to a minimum. Keep in mind, though, that this method could take up to 30 hours to complete, so plan accordingly.

    Step 1 – Make Your Shavings

    Make your shavings by using a cheese grater and large bowl. Place the bowl under the grater and grate your soap bars until they are all adequately flaked. You will need two cups of flakes.

    Step 2 – Mix the Flakes

    Mix your shavings with two-thirds cup of liquid cornstarch or white glue. It’s most effective to use a hand or stand mixer to do this. Add in four tablespoons of warm water and continue to mix until well combined.

    Step 3 – Add a Tint

    If desired, now’s when you would tint the mixture with food coloring or even something like glitter glue to give your snow-like substance the exact look you’re going for.

    Step 4 – Continue to Beat

    Beat the mixture until it turns into stiff peaks with a creamy consistency.

    Step 5 – Apply the Mixture

    Before beginning the application process, be sure to take the proper safety precautions. Wear a mask, gloves, and safety goggles for this part of the process. Place an old sheet, a tarp, or newspapers on the ground and set your tree up outside. Stand on a ladder close to the crown of your tree. You should work from the top down when applying the substance. Using a paint brush, scoop a dollop of the mixture and apply to the tip of the tree needles. Refrain from smearing the substance and from brushing the underside of the branches.

    Step 6 – Allow the Flock to Dry

    Allow the substance to dry for 24 hours or more to ensure that it’s completely settled on the branches. Once dry, you can continue with your decorations.

    How to Flock Your Christmas Tree – Method Two: Spray Paint

    How to create a wintery and snowy christmas tree without flocking it

    Another popular and effective method of flocking a Christmas tree is to use spray paint. While this method will cost a bit more to carry out, it provides a quicker turnaround time than the soap method above. It will take between three and four hours to actually perform and require only eight hours of drying time. Keep in mind that this is not a good method to use if you plan on using lights on your tree, as it could pose a safety hazard. For this project, you’ll need five or six cans of white spray paint, depending on the size of your tree.

    Step 1 – Set Up Your Tree

    Similar to what was done in the last method, set up your tree outside atop a sheet, tarp, or newspapers. Position a ladder next to the tree.

    Step 2 – Spray the Tree

    Before spraying the tree, ensure you are taking the proper safety precautions. Wear gloves, a mask, and safety goggles to protect yourself from the paint. Stand on the ladder close to the top of the tree, again working from the top down. Start by spritzing inner branches, working your way to those that are outer. If desired, sprinkle glitter onto the branches when they’re wet with paint to add more luster to your tree. Avoid spraying the underside of branches.

    Step 3 – Let the Tree Dry

    Let your tree dry for at least eight hours, but up to 24 depending on its size and how thickly layered the paint was sprayed onto its branches.

    Creating your own flocked holiday tree is as simple as that, and then it’ll be yours to enjoy for years to come if you use an artificial tree. A snow-kissed tree is the perfect way to enjoy a white Christmas without having to actually brave the chilly temperatures outside!