How to create a successful video resume

How to create a successful video resume

How to create a successful video resume

A video resume is a short video created by a candidate for employment and uploaded to the internet (or emailed to a hiring manager) for prospective employers to review. In the video, the candidate shares detailed information about their skills and experience.

Typically, this video is used to supplement, not replace, a paper resume. As with a print resume, it’s possible for the video resume to be either general or targeted toward a particular position or company. It can be created by a professional for you, or you can create your own. Some job search and networking sites provide a means for users to incorporate video resumes into their profiles.

How a Video Resume Can Help

Depending on your industry, a video resume could be a helpful add-on to your job application. It’s important to keep in mind that a video resume isn’t going to get you a job. However, it can assist you in marketing yourself to prospective employers—if it’s done right.  

Should You Create a Video Resume?

Creating a video resume is an optional task for job seekers. It’s quite rare for companies to require or request a video resume from candidates. A Robert Half survey reports that most companies (78%) prefer traditional resumes, either a Word Document or PDF. Only 3% were interested in video resumes or infographics.  

For some job seekers, particularly ones in visual or creative fields, a video resume can highlight valuable skills. For instance, a video resume is useful for showing any type of performance-based work, whether it involves acting on stage, teaching a class, or presenting quarterly numbers.

Also, a video resume can be an excellent way to show off your personality; for people in client-facing roles, whose work involves charming prospective buyers, a video resume may be beneficial.

However, if your role is not very visual, then a video resume might not help further your candidacy. You should also be mindful that it’s easy to miscalculate in a video resume—that is, there’s a high risk of the script, filming style, or location being inappropriate.

If you make your video resume yourself and have little filming experience, your video might come across as unprofessional.

Keep in mind that, as with anything on the internet, once your video file is out there, you cannot control how it’s shared.

An unprofessional or inappropriate video resume can hinder your chances of getting an interview. In a worst-case scenario, a poorly conceived and executed video resume can knock you out of contention and embarrass you.

Some hiring managers will not even view video resumes since they fear claims of discrimination in the hiring process. So, while a video resume can be a great way to get noticed, consider your options carefully before getting started to ensure that a video resume is the right fit for you, and a good use of your time.  

Tips for Creating a Video Resume

If you’re considering creating a video resume as part of your job search, keep these tips in mind:

  • Be professional: Dress as you would for an interview and maintain a professional demeanor. Avoid slang and, of course, cursing. Be cautious when it comes to jokes. What’s funny to you may not make others laugh.
  • Find a good background: Pay attention to the background of shots: make sure it looks tidy and that there are no noises in the background. You’ll also want to make sure the lighting is good. A shadow across half of your face can be distracting.
  • Prepare a script: Don’t ad-lib your video. You want to seem natural and off the cuff, but should have a sense of what you want to say and how you want to phrase it. Do not read directly from a script or from your resume, as that leads to a dull video. Think of the video as a pitch for why a particular company should hire you. As such, your main objective should be to express what benefits you’ll provide the company, as well as your goals, skills, and accomplishments.
  • Know your audience: As you plan your script and filming location, consider who will watch the video and calibrate accordingly. For instance, a video prepared for a position at a bank might differ from a video created for a start-up.
  • Show, don’t tell: Use visuals to illustrate what you’re saying in the video script, ones that showcase your talents and skills. For instance, if you’re applying for a job where presentations are a significant part of the role, you can film B-roll of yourself assembling a PowerPoint. If any of your presentations were recorded, use that footage in your video resume.
  • Keep it brief: Videos should be between 30 and 90 seconds. Anything longer than that is unlikely to be watched.
  • Share with friends and family: Getting feedback from others is an important step. Ask a few people to watch your video, and make edits and changes based on their comments.

Always keep in mind that once your video is on the internet, you no longer have control over who sees it or how it’s shared. Take feedback from friends and family seriously. If they think it’s a misfire, do not send the video to potential employers.

How to create a successful video resume

“There is a place where the possible and the impossible meet to become the possimpible.”

Barney Stinson, a character in the American sitcom “How I Met Your Mother” knows what he’s talking about even if the rest of us don’t. Crazy made-up words aside, he made the most awesome video resume ever!

Actually, having a video CV (VCV) may bring real benefits to your job search. Let’s explore why that might be.

The job market is growing and changing every day – there’s a load of professions that didn’t even exist 10 years ago. The technology industry has spawned a high demand for app developers, training consultants, social media managers, and user experience designers. New and different skills are needed for these types of jobs, including (social) media literacy, computational thinking, cross-cultural competency, and more.

Does this mean applying for a job today should also be different? In a way, yes.

How to create a successful video resume

Cover letters and paper print CVs are traditional and still widely used: you make a list of your qualities, write about your education and job experience, and send it to your potential employers.

But in the last couple of years, video resumes are making inroads into the job market. A video CV, if done tastefully, can be your golden ticket to a coveted position:

  • First, it gives you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd of written documents.
  • Second, it gives your employers the opportunity to get a better feel for you as a person, and how you might fit with their teams.
  • Third, many traditional job applications are scanned by robots nowadays and may be ignored if certain key terms related to the position are (or aren’t) included.

Do I Need a Video CV?

There is no definite answer one way or the other. That said, however, any application for a position requiring public speaking is likely to benefit from a video resume, because it’s the best way to show off the applicant’s professional skills. So, if you are considering applying for a job in PR, sales, marketing, or television, a video CV is the way to go. Prove your pitch skills by selling yourself!

Interestingly, more and more “non-media” job seekers are also getting creative with their CVs – doctors, teachers, and legal experts are making multimedia CVs, too. Dancers, singers, business coaches, tourism specialists… pretty much anyone can help their prospects with a video CV if they have something to show that’s harder to get across on paper.

How to create a successful video resume

What If I Don’t Have Enough Experience for the Job?

If you are a fresh graduate, you may find you’re struggling to “fill up” your VCV. Andrew Fennel, founder of CV-writing service StandOut CV, has a number of tips for how to make a resume look solid even without a lot of work experience:

  • research your target employers and find out the kind of people they are looking for, the qualities they value in potential employees
  • include details about your non-work related experience – education, interests, and hobbies
  • get involved with volunteer work – you’ll get valuable experience and have something meaningful to add to your resume

What Features Does a Good Video Resume Have?

How to Make a VCV?

Check Out the Competition

Watch some video CV examples on YouTube to get an idea of what works and – more importantly – what doesn’t.

Write a Script

Carefully think through everything you’re going to do and say in the video. Rehearse in front of a mirror or with a friend to critique your performance.

Arrange the Setting

The place and the way you look should be as if you were at a physical interview. What you wear is dependent on the job you’re applying for. Make sure that your surroundings are not messy and there is enough light.

How to create a successful video resume

Take Care of the Technical Stuff

Place the camera on a tripod to avoid camera shake. Find the best position so you don’t look like just a talking head. It can help your voice sound as clear as possible to use a microphone.

Edit the Footage

When you’re done filming, you need to edit the footage. You don’t have to be a professional videographer, you just need the right software. Movavi Video Editor is a good solution, because it has all the necessary tools and effects you need to polish your VCV.

Ask for Feedback

Always show someone your VCV before making it public. Take into account your friends’ comments, and keep tweaking it until the resume is perfect.

Depending on the skills and equipment you have, the whole process may take you up to a week. But if you do everything right, the result will be worth it.

For more tips on making a video resume, watch this video:

Where Should I Place My CV?

That depends. If you have a specific company in mind, go ahead and send it directly to the recruiters with a cover letter attached to your email. Upload your video to YouTube and include a link in your email, and also add the video to your LinkedIn profile, Twitter bio, and any business-oriented social network you use.

How to create a successful video resume

Final Thoughts

Regardless of what Barney Stinson thinks, a video CV is not a guarantee you’ll get the job. But a good video CV can help recruiters to see that, not only are you prepared to go the extra mile to get the job, but also that you have multiple talents. Always remember: a video resume doesn’t necessarily replace a paper CV, but does take your pitch for that coveted position to the next level.

By Mike Nale February 8, 2008 July 23, 2015

If you have been viewing more video resumes (or, what I like to call “vesumes”) recently, then you are aware of a growing trend that is replacing the standard 8 1/2-by-11-inch paper resume. And, with the speed of technology in our future, you are sure to see more.

Since I’m located in Hawaii, I have viewed a number of resumes as a part of my candidate searches, and it gives me a better picture of the candidate. Here is my advice on the 10 things that make a good video resume.

Article Continues Below
  1. Video Quality. Just like a paper resume, presentation and quality are important, so attention to detail means a lot. A good-quality video resume can range from something that someone shot at home on an old camcorder to a professionally-shot video that could have been paid for, not unlike a resume writing service. These productions are much better and come with clear pictures, excellent sound quality, and an overall professional look.
  2. Appearance. Did the person invest time and effort in making his or her vesume instead of shooting the entire video in one sitting and at one location?
  3. Language and Business Acumen. Does the person on the video speak clearly and with the knowledge and business acumen that grabs your attention?
  4. Substance. With most good vesumes, you will have the following: an introduction, objectives, history, knowledge or special skills, education, and a summary. It won’t always come out exactly in this order, or you may be missing some of it.
  5. Creativity. Perhaps the best thing about a vesume is the creativity that you see with what may otherwise be a standard candidate on paper. I like to see creativity because, generally speaking, if it gets your attention, it will get the client’s or hiring manager’s attention as well.
  6. Background. You will notice a lot about the quality of the video and often something about the person just based on the background or location.
  7. Character. My favorite part of viewing these videos is that it shows the person’s character and that may play a significant role in a good fit. It is a great way for candidates to show their stuff and be creative in the process.
  8. Editing. Review it for mistakes, errors, accuracy, and content. If you are new to reviewing vesumes, you can miss critical errors like something in the background or something that was said or was not said. So, if you are new to watching video resumes, watch them a couple of times. It will be clear after watching it more than once whether the candidate edited the video for content and clarity.
  9. References. One of the best vesumes I have reviewed actually had three very credible and desirable references at the end of it. It went a long way toward presenting a high-quality candidate.
  10. Length. The best video resumes are not epics. I like three to five minutes in length.

Video resumes are an excellent way to get companies to sit up and take notice—if you do it right. They give employers a more personal view of you than they’d get with a paper resume. They allow employers to see what you look like, how you present yourself, and whether you’d fit into the company culture. If you make the right impression, your video resume can bring you great success.

The problem with video resumes is that you often get conflicting advice: “show your personality” and “don’t get too crazy.” But the line between the two is different for everybody. Naturally, you don’t want to bore your viewers or sound just like everyone else. But your idea of adding a little personality to your video could strike your audience as hilarious—in the wrong way. You want them eager to meet you, not posting your video on YouTube.

If you want to make your online video stand out in a good way—and not end up as an unintentional viral joke—here are some do’s and don’ts.

Do Dress Professionally

It’s generally best to wear a suit, even if you’re applying for a job in a relatively casual field. You’ll make a better impression if you’re overdressed than if you’re underdressed. Both men and women should look neat and well-groomed. Avoid flashy jewelry and too much makeup.

A video resume can help you stand out in a crowded field. But if you’re not careful, it can send the wrong message.

Don’t Go On Too Long

Most successful video resumes run one to three minutes long. It might not sound like a lot of time, but to a recruiter who’s seen a hundred of these today, it will feel like plenty. Remember, less is more. Give enough information to spark an interest, but not enough to put your audience to sleep.

Do Choose Your “set” Carefully

You want all eyes to be on you—not on that KISS poster behind you on the living room wall. Your surroundings will make as much of an impression as your clothes and manner. Choose an area without distracting visuals. You don’t necessarily have to film in an office, but you do need to choose a location that won’t take away from your presentation or send the wrong message.

Don’t Go Unprepared

Before you go in front of the camera, you should know exactly what you’re going to say and how you’re going to say it. You’re not just reading your resume aloud on camera; you’re giving a sales pitch. So think like a salesman.

Think about what makes you stand out from all the other applicants your audience will see today—your “unique selling proposition.” What are the qualities that make you so successful at your work? Write a concise message, and practice it in front of the mirror until you know it by heart and can deliver it in a relaxed manner.

Do Highlight Relevant Skills

Some of the most infamous video resume failures involve applicants who feature skills that have nothing to do with the jobs they’re applying for. Leave out the footage of yourself lifting weights, ballroom dancing, and breaking boards with your fists—unless you’re applying for a job as an action star. Show employers what they want to see: your job-related skills.

Don’t Lose Your Personality

There’s a fine line between showing too much and too little. Leave out personal details, but don’t be afraid to let your personality come through. Be relaxed, avoid big gestures or nervous tics, smile, and act confident. “Professional” doesn’t have to mean “serious.”

Do Match Your Video To Your Industry

If you’re applying for a position in a formal, traditional company or industry—such as investment banking—your video resume is not the place to showcase your passion for rumba or break the ice with a little ventriloquism. If you’re looking for a job in a more creative field, however, you may be able to get away with a little more. Know your industry, and present yourself in a way that will show employers you’ll fit in.

Don’t Get Rid Of Your Paper Resum

A video resume is a great tool to get your foot in the door. But it shouldn’t be the only one in your toolbox. While a video resume should be a teaser that gets recruiters excited about you, your resume is the place for details about your job experience. Many successful applicants send both paper and video resumes so employers can get the complete picture.

Do Show Your Resume To Others For Feedback

A video resume can help you stand out in a crowded field. But if you’re not careful, it can send the wrong message. It might be short, but it’s important—so spend plenty of time planning, and show your video to friends, family, and trusted colleagues before sending it out. Take your time and gather honest feedback, and you should be able to make the right impression.

Writing a great resume is a balancing act. You need to outline your portfolio with professional keywords in your field, but also stand out from the pack. In addition, you need to strike a balance between presenting brief career highlights for recruiters who view resumes at a high-level while describing a greater depth of your experience for hiring managers who are taking a deeper dive.

One of the ways to get hiring managers to notice your resume is to showcase a high level of education. A recent survey of corporate recruiters shows 84 percent plan to hire candidates with a Master of Business Administration, that’s up 10 percent from 2014. 1

The University of Scranton offers a Master of Business Administration degree that not only enhances your resume, but your job prospects as well.

In addition to highlighting your education, here are five tips to create a stellar resume:

1. Select the right format

Choosing the right format for your resume depends on your industry or profession. Careers like banking, finance, and law are considered traditional, while positions in advertising, fashion, art, and innovative technologies are more creative. Many fields are somewhere in between.

As a rule of thumb, standard resume formats are expected in traditional fields. On the other hand, job seekers in creative fields have used innovative new formats including video, websites, social media tools, and even handmade books and artifacts to craft successful resumes.

2. Customize your resume

According to a recent CareerBuilder survey, 61 percent of employers prefer a resume that is customized to an open position. 2 CareerBuilder also found that 48 percent of employers spend less than two minutes reading a resume.

That means you should prepare a separate resume for each job that you apply to, preferably using bullet points and highlighting your most relevant skills and experience.

Advance your career with The University of Scranton

Advance your career in Business

3. Select a suitable length

Most of the time, one page is best because you generally are writing for busy recruiters. But occasionally, two pages may win you the job, especially for hiring managers looking for a range of experience, according to specialists convened by Monster.com. 3

Whatever you do, choose your words carefully so that you are not featuring outdated or irrelevant skills.

4. Be selective with word choice

Here’s a warning to resume writers: avoid clichés and outdated expressions. Hiring managers and recruiters in a recent survey by CareerBuilder ranked these as words as the most offensive: 4

  • Best of breed
  • Go-getter
  • Think outside the box
  • Synergy
  • Go-to person

The hiring executives also gave examples of words they would like to see on resumes, including:

  • Achieved
  • Improved
  • Trained/ mentored
  • Managed
  • Created

5. Avoid formatting mistakes

These days, resumes are often scanned by machines to determine if you have the relevant requirements. Make your resume “machine-readable” by keeping it to a standard font, without special features such as italics or underlining. 5

Many employers also advise having text only and no images or graphics. 6

Don’t let your resume get glossed over. With these tips and a mention of your MBA from The University of Scranton, hiring managers are more likely to take notice of your application.

Whether you’re a current federal employee or new to the federal government, your resume is the primary way for you to communicate your education, skills and experience.

Before you get started

Read the entire job announcement. Focus on the following sections to understand whether or not you qualify for the position. This critical information is found under:

  • Duties and Qualifications
  • How to Apply (including a preview of the assessment questionnaire)
  • How You Will be Evaluated

Make sure you have the required experience and/or education before you apply. Hiring agencies use the job announcement to describe the job and the required qualifications, including:

  • Level and amount of experience
  • Education
  • Training

What to include in your resume

Federal jobs often require that you have experience in a particular type of work for a certain period of time. You must show how your skills and experiences meet the qualifications and requirements listed in the job announcement to be considered for the job.

Include important contact information

Don’t forget to add current contact information. Most job applications require this information:

  • Address
  • Email
  • Phone number

Read the job opportunity carefully to make sure you have included all required contact information.

Include dates, hours, level of experience and examples for each work experience

For each work experience you list, make sure you include:

  • Start and end dates (including the month and year).
  • The number of hours you worked per week.
  • The level and amount of experience—for instance, whether you served as a project manager or a team member helps to illustrate your level of experience.
  • Examples of relevant experiences and accomplishments that prove you can perform the tasks at the level required for the job as stated in the job announcement. Your experience needs to address every required qualification.

Example

Program Analyst GS-343-11
January 2009—Present
40 Hours/Week
$63,000/Year

  • Experience/Accomplishment
  • Experience/Accomplishment

Include volunteer work and roles in community organizations

Don’t limit yourself to only including paid work experience. Include relevant volunteer work or community organizations roles that demonstrate your ability to do the job.

Use numbers to highlight your accomplishments

Use numbers, percentages or dollars to highlight your accomplishments—you can find this information in things like your performance reviews, previous job descriptions, awards and letters of recommendation.

When explaining your accomplishments:

  • Include examples of how you saved money, earned money or managed money.
  • Include examples of how you saved or managed time.

Examples

  • “Improved efficiency of document processing by 25 percent over the previous year”.
  • “Wrote 25 news releases in a three-week period under daily deadlines”.
  • “Managed a student organization budget of more than $7,000”.
  • “Wrote prospect letter that has brought in more than $25,000 in donations to date”.

These statements show in concrete terms what you accomplished.

More resume writing tips

Customize your resume

You should tailor your resume to the job announcement rather than sending out the same resume for every job. Customizing your resume helps you match your competencies, knowledge, skills, abilities and experience to the requirements for each job. Emphasize your strengths and include everything you’ve done that relates to the job you’re seeking. Leave out experience that isn’t relevant.

Use similar terms and address every required qualification

Your experience needs to address every required qualification in the job announcement. Hiring agencies will look for specific terms in your resume to make sure you have the experience they’re seeking.

For example, if the qualifications section says you need experience with “MS Project” you need to use the words ” MS Project” in your resume.

Organize your resume to make it easy to understand

You need to organize your resume to help agencies evaluate your experience. If you don’t provide the information required for the hiring agency to determine your qualifications, you might not be considered for the job.

  • Use reverse chronological order to list your experience—start with your most recent experience first and work your way back.
  • Provide greater detail for experience that is relevant to the job for which you are applying.
  • Show all experiences and accomplishments under the job in which you earned it. This helps agencies determine the amount of experience you have with that particular skill.
  • Use either bullet or paragraph format to describe your experiences and accomplishments.
  • Use plain language—avoid using acronyms and terms that are not easily understood.

Be concise

Hiring agencies often receive dozens or even hundreds of resumes for certain positions. Hiring managers quickly skim through submissions and eliminate candidates who clearly are not qualified. Look at your resume and ask:

  • Can a hiring manager see my main credentials within 10 to 15 seconds?
  • Does critical information jump off the page?
  • Do I effectively sell myself on the top quarter of the first page?

Review your resume before you apply

Check your resume for spelling and grammatical errors and have someone else, with a good eye for detail, review your resume.

Last year, I applied for the job I now have (and love!): the Account Management role at ZeroCater. The position seemed like a perfect fit, and I couldn’t send in my resume quickly enough.

However, part of the application process included submitting a video, which was a very first in my job search adventures. It was surprisingly difficult to figure out how to make an entertaining 3-minute video of me talking—it was awkward, and I didn’t really want to do it. But I forged ahead, spent a weekend making the video, sent in my application, and ended up landing the job.

Now, seven months later, I’m involved in the interviewing and hiring process at ZeroCater HQ, which includes watching applicant videos. From this side of things, I certainly see their value and understand their rise in popularity. We receive hundreds of resumes every month, and a video allows us to get a more dynamic sense of someone than the written word allows. It’s difficult to get a feel for someone’s personality and creativity from a stack of resumes and cover letters—which are meant to be standardized—whereas videos bring our applicants off the page and give a more holistic picture of why they’re great.

If you find yourself faced with the task of making an application video, fear not! The wonderful part about a video application is the level of control it enables. If a take doesn’t go well, you can erase it. If you make a joke and immediately realize that it was severely less funny than you’d hoped, you can take it back! It’s an interview minus the mishaps and subsequent facepalms, and the chance to make an awesome first impression with the added ability to take as much time as necessary to get it right.

On that note, here are a few tips to help you make a 5-star application video.

1. Plan Before You Film

Think about how you’d like to respond to the given prompt, and consider what video format works best for you. Are you comfortable talking to the camera on your computer or phone, or would it be easier to have a friend “interview” you? Or, how about a slideshow with a voiceover, using Story Wheel? All of these things are options, so be creative and choose something that feels natural to you.

2. Don’t Recite Your Resume

Instead of listing past roles and responsibilities, take the opportunity to share an experience or quality about yourself that has particular relevance to the position but that might not shine through on your resume. For example, one of our applicants listed “bike trip leader” in the “Special Skills” section at the bottom of her resume. Her video focused on this part of her background and, through photos and stories, showed us that she’s an energetic leader who’s able to build community over a shared experience. It was exactly what we were looking for—and she works here now.

3. Work From a Script (But Avoid Reading Directly From It)

Once you’ve finalized what exactly you want to cover, plan the main points you’d like to convey and jot down clear ways to say them. Writing your ideas ahead of time encourages intention and clarity—and helps eliminate run-on sentences and excessive “ums” and “likes.”

4. Make Sure Your Video is Clear and Audible

We want to see you and hear what you have to say! Reduce background noise, choose a well-lit setting, and avoid having the camera pointing up your nose. These things sound obvious, but believe me, they go a long way.

5. Shoot Several Takes if Necessary

The beauty of an application video is that you don’t have to settle on a bad take. If the neighbor’s dog is barking incessantly in the background or you get off track, do it again. In my case, I couldn’t figure out how to sign off in a way that seemed natural. Was I supposed to say “bye?” Just stop talking? After a few takes, I found a smile and wave that didn’t make me look insane.

6. Watch Your Own Video

Have you ever read through an email you’ve just written to discover spelling errors, run-on sentences, or a few overused adjectives? I know I have. You should watch your video for the same reason: catching those silly mistakes. Consider having a friend check it out too—a fresh set of eyes can help notice mistakes or idiosyncrasies that you may have overlooked.

7. Edit What You Make

Programs like iMovie, Final Cut Pro, and Movie Maker are intuitive and easy to use, and there are plenty of free video editing programs to try. You don’t have to be a seasoned editor to make small changes that go a long way. If you can’t figure something out, there are a myriad of YouTube tutorials to show you how.

I can’t speak for all employers, but as far as our team is concerned, we aren’t looking for the most well-written monologue or the highest production quality in our applicants’ videos. We’re looking for personality, creativity, intelligence, and effort. A video is an extra opportunity to show a company why you really would be an excellent addition to their team, so have fun and take advantage of it.

Samantha Millets

If you are trying to advance in your career in marketing, you need to have a dynamic resume that is going to grab attention and spark the interest of potential employers. You need to take a good, hard look at your skills and experience, and find a way to make these things really stand out and show that you are the best candidate for the job. Since marketing is your thing, you need to think about how you can market yourself, and take the next step in your career. The following are some of the best secrets to creating a successful marketing resume.

#1. Know Your Audience

Before you can market anything, you need to know who you are going to be marketing to. It is the same with your resume. You need to know who you are going to market yourself to, and craft a resume that shows you have what it takes to meet all of their marketing needs. If you are interested in working with smaller companies, your resume should show that you have the ability to successfully market within a small budget. If a larger corporation is your dream career, then you will need to show that you can handle any size job, and work projects with huge budgets, including international projects.

#2. Know Your Messaging Strategy

Anything you create, you need to do so with a plan or strategy. Otherwise, things are likely going to end up pretty haphazard. So, keep in mind that there are several choices to make, including how to structure your resume to show your value, which keywords to use, how to give real examples of your value and what you can bring to a company, and the best layout and design to really make your message stand out and get noticed. You need to put this plan together before you even think about writing your resume.

#3. Design Matters

Your resume needs to have visual appeal. If it is boring at first sight, chances are a potential employer is going to pass it by and move on to one that is more dynamic. The layout of the resume should show your message, along with your strategy. Structure the resume around your value proposition so it is clear to employers exactly who you are, what you want, and what you have to offer. Be sure to use professional looking resume templates.

#4. Quantify Digital Marketing Results

Seeing as how everything in your profession can be analyzed and measured, you need to do the same thing in your own story to be truly effective. Think about the things you can do to make certain aspects of your resume stand out. First, write your resume, and then you can read it to see what needs to be emphasized. Be sure to use realistic figures, and don’t round numbers up when you are dealing with percentages. While it looks great to say that you helped to increase web traffic by 30%, it looks fake. It is more realistic to say it increased by 31%.

#5. Use the Right Keywords

As a marketer, you know all about the use of keywords to bring traffic to a website. Your resume needs to also have the right keywords. Basically, it should have terms that will stand out to employers. There are certain things that employers are looking for, and they are looking for particular keywords that will show them that you have what they want. Be sure to do your research on every company that you apply to in order to make sure that you are using the right keywords.

#6. Associate Yourself with Bigger Brands

If you are able to show that you have been affiliated with bigger brands, do so on your resume. This is really going to make you stand out, because employers will consider the fact that you have the talent and skills that were desired by the big brands. This is going to make you a lot more attractive than other prospects who do not have this type of association.

#7. Know that You are the Product

While you are a person, when it comes to finding a new job, you are also a product that you are trying to sell. Always remember this when you are crafting a resume. You need to sell yourself to potential employers. You need to market yourself in a way that makes you totally irresistible to employers, and make them want to hire you over other potential candidates.

#8. Skills Employers Look For

When crafting your resume, think about the skills that employers are looking for. These days, there are certain digital marketing skills that will stand out more than others, and if you have these skills, you need to make sure that they are highlighted in your resume. The skills employers want include:

  • Content Marketing – Employers want people who are able to create blogs, infographics, surveys, webinars, and other forms of content marketing. Job titles can include brand journalist, managing editor, and content marketing manager.
  • Social Media Marketing – These days, companies are heavy into social marketing, because this is where they can find millions of potential customers. If you are skilled in marketing on social media, make sure to let potential employers know it. Job titles include social media marketer and community manager.
  • Video Marketing – It is no secret that potential customers are often heavily influenced by videos. You can tell a story with a video that can’t be told in any other way, and employers are looking for people who have video marketing skills and experience. Job titles include video production specialist and video marketing manager.

It takes a bit of work to craft a successful marketing resume, but with these tips, you should have no problem creating a resume that is going to land you the career of your dreams. Just remember the key is to market yourself, just as you would with any product or service that you are creating a marketing campaign for. The better you market yourself, the better your chances are going to be of landing that dream job.

How to Make a Video Profile for Interviews

How to create a successful video resume

Do you want to make a video resume for yourself? Are you debating whether or not you need one? In today’s world, the competition is fierce. You’re typically up against hundreds of other candidates when applying for a job. In addition, although it has gotten easier to discover job opportunities on the internet, it has become more difficult to get such positions. The majority of job hopefuls struggle to distinguish themselves from the crowd and earn a chance at that prized interview. An online video resume may be very beneficial if you want to get an advantage over your competitors and score more interviews.

What is a Video Resume, and how does it work?

A video resume is a short film produced by job searchers in an effort to persuade prospective employers to hire them for a particular position. In addition to a conventional resume, it is often presented in conjunction with one.

What Is the Value of a Video Resume?

Video resumes, however, may not be fit for everyone; most job applicants do not need one. In fact, video resumes are not required for the vast majority of positions available today. Whether or not you need one is determined by the industry, position, and business you are applying for. Below are a few instances for which you might need a video resume:

  • Work in a field requiring creativity and visuals, such as design, cinematography, motion graphics, video production, directing, acting, teaching, and cooking.
  • If you want to be successful at your job, your attitude and communication abilities must be on display. For example, you might want to show such abilities when applying for a position that entails facing and enticing potential clients.
  • Your recruiter has asked you to put together a video resume for your application.
  • You’re looking for a position at a small business that doesn’t utilize an applicant tracking system (ATS) and hasn’t automated its recruiting process.
  • You have a lot of experience but want to highlight the parts that are relevant to the position you’re applying for.

What is the best way to create a video CV?

How to create a successful video resume

Job searchers must record their video CV or profile by using a video resume builder that records that webcam.

Fortunately, creating a video resume using a Bandicam webcam recorder is a straightforward process. You may record your camera, screen, and voice simultaneously, as well as add additional effects to the video, such as a logo or text.

In this post, we’ll show you how to create a video resume using Bandicam’s built-in features. Making a video resume doesn’t have to be a difficult task; all you need are some good video equipment and basic video editing knowledge. Below are the procedures to follow while creating a video resume.

How to Make a Video Profile for Interviews

1. Create a script for your presentation.

To prepare for your interview, jot down what you’d like to express to the recruiter. Write as though you are speaking. Moreover, make sure that your notes are written in a conversational tone, and keep your sentences brief and to the point. Also, while shooting, avoid reading straight from the screenplay in order to prevent seeming too robotic. Instead, remember the script so that you can appear more personable and professional on the phone. Alternative: sketch out a rough outline of the key points and develop on them afterward while shooting the scene.

2. Set up the recording equipment.

  • Download and install the Bandicam Webcam recorder.
  • Choose the recording option that you wish to use. You have the option of recording your video resume using either the webcam recording mode (option 1) or the screen recording mode (option 2).

How to create a successful video resume

3-1. Using a webcam to record (option 1)

In Device recording mode, you may capture video from your webcam.

  • Pick “Device Recording” mode from the drop-down menu and then click on the “Device Settings” button to select the device you wish to record with.

How to create a successful video resume

  • To record only your voice, pick Disable as the “Speakers” option, and then select the microphone as the “Microphone.” (If you want to record both computer sound and your voice, select the speaker device instead of the Disable option).

How to create a successful video resume

  • If you need a logo and/or text overlay, you may add as you desire.
  • To start or stop the recording, click the ● REC button or the hotkey (F12) on your keyboard (The hotkey for the ‘Record/Stop’ functions can be changed).

How to create a successful video resume

3-2. Making a recording of the screen (option 2)

The instructions listed below will guide you through the process of recording your computer screen and camera simultaneously.

  • Select the ‘Screen Recording Mode,’ and pick the ‘Fullscreen’ or ‘recording area’ from the drop-down menu.

4. Examine and distribute your video resume.

You may see your video inside the output folder if you want to. If you are happy with the recording, send it to your employer or submit it to video-sharing platforms. You can upload your content to YouTube or Vimeo from the Bandicam interface.

How to create a successful video resume

Conclusion

The employment market is very competitive; that’s why you should not be afraid to utilize any and all of the resources at your disposal in order to get the position you want. The video resume maker that we have discussed in this article provides a broad range of capabilities, but it is up to you to figure out how to use these tools in a creative manner. What is your preferred technique for putting up a video resume? Please let us know by leaving a comment.

How to create a successful video resume

Forget your standard paper resume and that trite goal statement of 1996. If you want to create a resume that will jumpstart your career in 2017, you need to think viral, virtual, and versatile.

In this article, we’ll discuss how to create a resume for the digital age perfectly, including utilizing social media and video content to bring your resume into the 21st century. Design A Modern Resume Traditional resumes were designed to be readable but plain, easy to fax or copy. The modern employer, however, is more likely to view your resume on a screen, which means you can take advantage of the ability to present a more eye-catching and visually impressive design. That doesn’t mean your resume needs to be a work of art. A streamlined layout with strong fonts, clear organization, and a pop of color is always a great way to go, as long as your resume leads readers easily down the page and highlights the most important information. There are highly-rated resume-builders you can use to make an ideal resume for today’s marketplace. Choose a Stand-Out Design A good design is one that looks modern, professional, and appropriate for the job you’re applying for. It may be a good idea to study the psychology of color to help you decide what color schemes will draw your employer’s eye. Remember, when you’re creating a resume, what you’re really doing is marketing yourself to potential employers. Keeping that in mind can help you create a resume to give the best possible impression. Focus on Accomplishments, Not Skills Showcase your major achievements instead of just listing what you’re good at. While the job may require you to know Microsoft Office, listing this as a skill is not going to set you ahead of the pack. Employers are far more interested in what you’ve accomplished with your skills. Using numbers can also add weight to each bullet point on your resume. For example, managing 50 people is more impressive than managing a team. What if the job requires specific qualifications? Then, it may be appropriate to add your skill set in order to show you’ve read the job posting closely. Don’t fret if you don’t meet every single one–most employers publish what’s known as a “wish list” of skills, but are willing to go with a candidate they think can get the job done. Make Use of the Space Dense resumes are hard to read, and thus more likely to be rejected. Having a good amount of white space on the page makes it easier for a hiring manager to read and directly improves the chance of making a good impression. Employers are more likely to pay attention to the top third of a resume [i]. The best use for this space include your most notable accomplishments, the skill you think is most valuable, and your basic contact information. While many traditional resumes suggest an “Objective” listed as front and center, in the digital age objectives have become less common. Your resume is about marketing yourself, so the objective should be implied in your resume or stated in your cover letter. LinkedIn: Let Social Media Work in Your Favor Googling during the job hunt works both ways! Employers have been known to use both search engines and social media to find and cull prospective candidates. LinkedIn is a great website where you can create a positive, job-friendly social media presence. You’ve probably heard of it, but is it something you’re taking full advantage of? 89% of recruiters hire people from LinkedIn [ii], and that’s an opportunity you can’t afford to waste! Here are a few tips to make the most of your LinkedIn profile:

  • Fill out all relevant information, particular work history and ALL of your skills, as this will make you 13 times more likely to get looked at. [iii]
  • Use a professional-looking profile photo, as this makes you 14 times more likely to be looked at by employers. [iv]
  • Add anything of value. LinkedIn makes it possible for you to post materials other than your resume, like links to blogs, podcasts, etc. If you have recently created an amazing presentation or video, you may be able to post this as well.

Create a Resume with Video to Showcase Yourself and Your Work The job market is tough. Sometimes for the right job, you have to pull out all the stops and do the extreme. If you make a video you are letting your employer know that you not only understand how to use technology, but also how to market something, namely yourself. Resumes in video format aren’t very common, despite the fact that video content is increasingly popular: it makes up more than over 50% of all mobile traffic, and could be as much 75% in the next five years [v]! If you make your video correctly, your prospective employers will appreciate your originality, and this edge may possibly land you the job. Get creative, and think beyond YouTube or Vimeo! Why not use Vine to make a short, creative Vine resume? Not sure how to make your video resume unique? Scour the web for inspiration. One man, from Holland, posted a “mock confessional” YouTube video, specifically about what a workaholic he is. Depending on your skill set you may use humor, animation, or just your best friends speaking on your behalf! Another candidate used a straightforward but fun, brief video with moving informational icons and music. Some people have the expertise to make cutting edge, cinema-quality videos, but that’s not necessary for everyone. As long as the video reflects who you are and telegraphs the qualities you can offer to the employer. Remember to showcase your personality, all of your relevant skills, and experience━just like on your printed resume! If possible, highlight a recent project you’ve finished. You are not only selling your skill set, but are selling yourself as an employee in a way you could never do with a traditional resume, so use your voice and body language effectively. A video resume can also help prepare you for the video interview. Many employers are increasing their use of video interviews to screen potential candidates [vi]. As you create your video resume, it is important to make a list of the questions you will most likely be asked by an employer. By reviewing and running back the footage, you can troubleshoot areas where you paused, or sounded unsure of yourself. So, now that you have the tools to create a resume for the digital age, what are you waiting for? Once you have a career in mind, it’s time to start putting yourself out there to pursue your dream job.

“I’ve been getting a lot of tips on how to write it, mostly from my staff. They really seem to be up on this stuff. They tell me I have to use the active voice for the resume. You know, things like “Commanded U.S. Armed Forces,” “Ordered air strikes,” “Served three terms as President.” Everybody embellishes a little.”

-President Bill Clinton, White House Correspondents Dinner, April 29, 2000

As a professional who reviews resumes on a frequent basis, I see a flood of resumes from different people with different backgrounds every week.

Generally the undergraduate/recent graduate resumes I see fall into 1 of 2 categories: they are either very impressive and don’t need much work aside from minor formatting issues, or they are good but suffer from a few common problems.

The two most common problems I’ve seen are not being specific enough and not focusing on results. If your resume reads, “Compiled information and research,” those reviewing it might rightfully think that you yourself don’t know exactly what your responsibilities were.

Focusing on the results is equally as important: why would someone hire you if you can’t get results?

Sample Resume Improvement

Here’s a good example of what NOT to write on your resume, if you are applying for financial services jobs:

“-Researched acquisition targets in the construction and home-building industries.”

This is not specific enough and does not give me any insight into how you did this, what your process was, or what the results of your work were.

What resources did you use to research these? Did you speak with experts? Reference the Wall Street Journal? What criteria did you use to make the final selections? Revenue? Profitability? Scale? Management teams?

Those are all crucial details left out of this example.

Here’s an improved version:

“-Researched over 100 acquisition targets in the construction and home-building industries using Capital IQ and Factset and narrowed list down to 10 best companies. Used financial screening criteria such as revenue growth and EBITDA margins. Also used qualitative criteria such as market dynamics in construction sub-segments, strength of management teams and exposure to subprime mortgage.”

This is much better than the first version, but could still use some improvement: the results of your labor. What did you spend all those hours doing, if not for the results?

Sometimes people say they don’t know what the results were or are not able to directly tie anything to their work. If this is the case, be creative and come up with results.

I’m not suggesting that you lie, but as Bill Clinton points out above, sometimes you do have to exaggerate slightly. Don’t suggest your beautiful Excel graph resulted in $1 million of additional revenue, but claiming improved efficiency or time/money saved is fine.

Here’s an example of how we might add a focus on results to this example:

“-Researched over 100 acquisition targets in the construction and home-building industries using Capital IQ and Factset and narrowed list down to 10 best companies. Used financial screening criteria such as revenue growth and EBITDA margins. Also used qualitative criteria such as market dynamics in construction sub-segments, strength of management teams and exposure to subprime mortgage. Resulted in private equity firm doing additional diligence on 3 of the companies.”

I will admit this is a bit of a stretch – in this particular case, it would be quite difficult to tell what the true results were.

And sometimes you may indeed not be able to determine the results. But if your resume does not have a single mention of results anywhere on it, you can definitely find a few instances where you do have tangible results and expand on those.

Graphic skills

Unsure how to make a cover letter pairing well with your resume? This free tutorial in WPS Official Academy guides you to make a nice cover letter for a resume in WPS Office Word.

An outstanding cover letter for a job application could land you an interview opportunity.

l What is a cover letter for a resume in WPS Office Word?

A cover letter is usually a one-page document you send to the employer with your resume, which aims at providing a basic overview of your work experience, personal skills and the reason why you’re suitable for this occupation opening. A resume focuses on your achievements and skills, while a cover letter showcases your personality and makes some extension to a large extent.

The submission of a cover letter along with the resume is not mandatory; however, many employers use it to evaluate your capabilities, passion, etc.

l Steps to make a cover letter for a resume in WPS Office Word.

Ø Be aware of what a successful cover letter contains

A complete and attractive cover letter should be composed of the following details:

u Contact Information

u Salutation (addressing the manager)

u An Open Paragraph (including the company name, job position, how it’s discovered, intention to apply, etc.)

u Your qualifications and the matching degree to the company’s needs

u A concise closing paragraph expressing your expectations and gratitude

How to create a successful video resume

Ø Typeset a professional cover letter in WPS Office Word

1. Adjust alignment.

In the Home tab, click the Align Text Left button to align all the text to the left. You can also use the shortcut Ctrl+L .

How to create a successful video resume

Press Ctrl+A to select all the content in the text box, and press Ctrl+D to pop up the Font dialog, where you can change font and size in the Latin text font area.

How to create a successful video resume

Here are some recommended professional fonts available in WPS Writer.

u Times New Roman

3. Adjust line spacing.

Press Ctrl+A to select all, right-click and select Paragraph .

In the pop-up dialog, set Line Spacing to an appropriate value based on your word amount and margins.

How to create a successful video resume

4. Export the cover letter to PDF .

Go to the Tools tab, click Export to PDF , set Save Path and Export Type , and click Export to PDF .

How to create a successful video resume

Ø Refer to a cover letter template in WPS Office Word

Alternatively, WPS provides you with a plenty of cover letter templates in Template Store.

1. Open WPS Office, and click the Templates button.

2. Enter cover letter in the search box, and click to use a suitable template.

3. Now you can flexibly edit the content of cover letter which is already perfectly typeset.

How to create a successful video resume

Note: The WPS Template Premium members enjoy more professional and exquisite templates. Subscribe for WPS Premium right now!

Until now, we have learned how to make a cover letter for a resume in WPS Office Word step by step. If you’re interested in more detailed operations about typesetting of a functional document, feel free to refer to WPS Academy!

Click to visit WPS Official Acadmy for more free tutorials:

WPS Writer is a free word editing software included by WPS Office Suite. WPS Writer offers all the basic and advanced functions without charge. For students and researchers, WPS Writer is a perfect choice for writing essays; for office workers, it’s a professional tool for generating reports. Along with PDF, Spreadsheet and Presentation, you can make your work more comprehensive and out standing.

Applying for jobs can be a truly miserable experience. Sending out endless résumés, filling out those janky online applications, and creating cover letters can really wear a person down. So, any suggestions that make that process easier are always welcome.

If you suspect your application to be read by an applicant tracking system, you can hide invisible keywords in your résumé to make sure it makes it past the bots and into human hands. But what’s a fast way to know what those keywords are?

To create successful and relevant cover letter, you need to hone in on those keywords job recruiters and programs are looking for. While you can scan through job descriptions and try counting words of emphasis, there is no better or faster way to view those emphasized keywords than a good ol’ word cloud.

Word Clouds Are So Money

Word clouds (or tag clouds) were created for the sole purpose of quickly identifying the most important terms and words of a webpage, posting, or article. Having a visual representation of the text makes the process of finding keywords super easy. So you can turn an intimidating job description into a cover letter friendly word cloud.

How to create a successful video resume

Now you can easily see the points of emphasis and gear your following cover letter to address those points. This become super helpful when applying to multiple jobs or jobs with detailed descriptions.

Word Cloud Generators

There are more than a couple online that you can use, but the ones are below are the word cloud generators I always turn to.

Wordle

If you’re a Google Chrome user like myself, you may have some trouble with one of the most popular word cloud generators, Wordle. It requires some Java permissions and was a no-go on Chrome, but it should work great on Safari and Mozilla Firefox.

All you need to do is copy/paste the job description into the text box and hit GO. You can adjust the formatting including colors, font, and orientation once your cloud is created.

How to create a successful video resume

ABCya!

If something works, then I don’t really care what it looks like. ABCya! is a word cloud generator that works perfectly in Chrome. While the site is designed for children, it works just the same for adults. Like Wordle, copy/paste the desired text in the empty box and hit the GO arrow.

How to create a successful video resume

You can adjust the formatting including colors, font, and orientation once your cloud is created.

Other Word Cloud Generators

You can also check out Worditout, TagCrowd, and Tagul, though that last one requires a signup. Use any others? Let us know what they are, and if anyone knows of a browser extension that makes this even easier, let us know. The faster this process is, the better it gets.

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Ukraine latest as a 21-year-old Russian soldier’s war crimes trial begins; FSB agents believe Vladimir Putin is terminally ill after receiving a top-secret memo, reports claim; leader’s wife hit with new sanctions; G7 foreign ministers meet in Germany.

  • LIVE
  • Russia
  • Ukraine

Key points
  • US embassy in Kyiv likely to reopen ‘very soon’
  • Russia ‘likely’ to have lost ‘one third’ of ground troops and is ‘unlikely’ to ‘accelerate its rate of advance’ in next 30 days, UK MoD says
  • Ukraine wins Eurovision – with band making plea to held defenders of Azovstal steelworks
  • Captured Ukrainian city will ask to join Russia
  • Russia ‘loses’ battle for Kharkiv
  • New UK sanctions target Putin’s family
  • Finland announces NATO bid – as president sends message to Putin
  • How one man forced the delay of a vital US aid package for Ukraine
  • Russian agents ‘believe Putin is terminally ill’ – report
  • Updates from Sky News correspondent Dominic Waghorn in Kyiv. Live reporting by Jess Sharp

Sweden’s governing party has endorsed joining NATO.

This could lead to the country applying for membership within days.

Public support for membership has soared since Russia invaded Ukraine.

It reverses decades of opposition in Sweden to the idea of joining NATO.

Ukraine has deployed numerous M-777 howitzers on its front lines, after the US delivered 89 out of 90 of the artillery pieces promised.

The howitzers form part of the US’s most recent $800m package of support sent to Ukraine.

The US embassy in Ukraine tweeted a video to celebrate the share the development.

Annalena Baerbock, the foreign minister of Germany, says that Russia’s behaviour amounts to a unilateral repudiation of a 1997 deal with NATO.

“The Russian government has made it clear that the NATO-Russia Founding Act is no longer worth anything to it.

“So we now have to acknowledge that this basic act was also unilaterally terminated by Russia, not by NATO.”

The agreement was put in place to build trust and limit both sides’ presence in eastern Europe.

NATO suspended practical cooperation with Russia in 2014 after it annexed Crimea.

The US secretary of state, Antony Blinken, says the US embassy in Kyiv will be reopened “very soon”.

Speaking at an unofficial NATO summit in Berlin, Mr Blinken also said there was support “almost across the board” from existing members of NATO for Finland and Sweden to join the organisation.

He added that he had spoken to Turkey’s foreign minister about the matter.

Turkey has said it wants guarantees on terrorism and export controls from the Nordic states in the meantime.

Germany’s foreign minister, Annalena Baerbock, says support for Ukraine must be kept up as long as they need it.

She goes on to say that the door is open for Finland and Sweden to join Nato.

Ms Baerbock says the pair are in fact “already members” of the organisation – just without a membership card.

Jens Stoltenberg says “Ukraine can win this war” against Russia.

Speaking from Brussels, the secretary general said Russia had failed to take Kyiv and Kharkiv, and was stalling in its assault in the Donbas.

Mr Stoltenberg adds that Finland and Sweden joining NATO would make the countries safer.

The secretary general goes on to say there will be attempts to speed up the Finnish and Swedish applications, and that he will look to increase the NATO presence in the region in the meantime.

Russia says it has carried out numerous missile strikes in parts of eastern Ukraine.

It comes following reports that Ukrainian soldiers have pushed Russian forces out of the city of Kharkiv.

According to the Russian defence ministry, it struck two command points, 11 company positions and four artillery stores.

The claims could not be independently verified.

Watch Finland’s president, Sauli Niinisto, confirm the countries application to join NATO.

Turkey’s foreign minister has held talk with counterparts from Finland and Sweden.

It comes after reports Turkey may not quickly approve the Nordic states joining NATO.

Macrin Zaborowski, the policy director for the future of security programme at GLOBSEC, said it is likely Turkey wants concessions from NATO in order to greenlight the two new members.

Turkey says it has concerns about terrorism in Finland and Sweden, and that it is not seeking leverage over the organisation.

The foreign minister also wants export bans to Turkey lifted.

Finland has announced it will apply to join NATO, and Sweden is expected to follow suit.

Speaking following the announcement they will be joining NATO, Finland’s prime minister said the move was necessary following the invasion of Ukraine.

Responding to a question from Sky News, Sanna Marin said: “When we look at Russia, we see a very different kind of Russia than we saw just a few months ago.

“Everything changed when Russia attacked Ukraine, and I personally think we cannot trust any more that there will be a peaceful future next to Russia with our own.

“That is why we are making the decision to join NATO.

“It’s an act of peace.”

She added: “We have had wars with Russia and we don’t want that kind of future for ourselves or for our children.”

Ukraine latest as a 21-year-old Russian soldier’s war crimes trial begins; FSB agents believe Vladimir Putin is terminally ill after receiving a top-secret memo, reports claim; leader’s wife hit with new sanctions; G7 foreign ministers meet in Germany.

  • LIVE
  • Russia
  • Ukraine

Key points
  • US embassy in Kyiv likely to reopen ‘very soon’
  • Russia ‘likely’ to have lost ‘one third’ of ground troops and is ‘unlikely’ to ‘accelerate its rate of advance’ in next 30 days, UK MoD says
  • Ukraine wins Eurovision – with band making plea to held defenders of Azovstal steelworks
  • Captured Ukrainian city will ask to join Russia
  • Russia ‘loses’ battle for Kharkiv
  • New UK sanctions target Putin’s family
  • Finland announces NATO bid – as president sends message to Putin
  • How one man forced the delay of a vital US aid package for Ukraine
  • Russian agents ‘believe Putin is terminally ill’ – report
  • Updates from Sky News correspondent Dominic Waghorn in Kyiv. Live reporting by Jess Sharp

Sweden’s governing party has endorsed joining NATO.

This could lead to the country applying for membership within days.

Public support for membership has soared since Russia invaded Ukraine.

It reverses decades of opposition in Sweden to the idea of joining NATO.

Ukraine has deployed numerous M-777 howitzers on its front lines, after the US delivered 89 out of 90 of the artillery pieces promised.

The howitzers form part of the US’s most recent $800m package of support sent to Ukraine.

The US embassy in Ukraine tweeted a video to celebrate the share the development.

Annalena Baerbock, the foreign minister of Germany, says that Russia’s behaviour amounts to a unilateral repudiation of a 1997 deal with NATO.

“The Russian government has made it clear that the NATO-Russia Founding Act is no longer worth anything to it.

“So we now have to acknowledge that this basic act was also unilaterally terminated by Russia, not by NATO.”

The agreement was put in place to build trust and limit both sides’ presence in eastern Europe.

NATO suspended practical cooperation with Russia in 2014 after it annexed Crimea.

The US secretary of state, Antony Blinken, says the US embassy in Kyiv will be reopened “very soon”.

Speaking at an unofficial NATO summit in Berlin, Mr Blinken also said there was support “almost across the board” from existing members of NATO for Finland and Sweden to join the organisation.

He added that he had spoken to Turkey’s foreign minister about the matter.

Turkey has said it wants guarantees on terrorism and export controls from the Nordic states in the meantime.

Germany’s foreign minister, Annalena Baerbock, says support for Ukraine must be kept up as long as they need it.

She goes on to say that the door is open for Finland and Sweden to join Nato.

Ms Baerbock says the pair are in fact “already members” of the organisation – just without a membership card.

Jens Stoltenberg says “Ukraine can win this war” against Russia.

Speaking from Brussels, the secretary general said Russia had failed to take Kyiv and Kharkiv, and was stalling in its assault in the Donbas.

Mr Stoltenberg adds that Finland and Sweden joining NATO would make the countries safer.

The secretary general goes on to say there will be attempts to speed up the Finnish and Swedish applications, and that he will look to increase the NATO presence in the region in the meantime.

Russia says it has carried out numerous missile strikes in parts of eastern Ukraine.

It comes following reports that Ukrainian soldiers have pushed Russian forces out of the city of Kharkiv.

According to the Russian defence ministry, it struck two command points, 11 company positions and four artillery stores.

The claims could not be independently verified.

Watch Finland’s president, Sauli Niinisto, confirm the countries application to join NATO.

Turkey’s foreign minister has held talk with counterparts from Finland and Sweden.

It comes after reports Turkey may not quickly approve the Nordic states joining NATO.

Macrin Zaborowski, the policy director for the future of security programme at GLOBSEC, said it is likely Turkey wants concessions from NATO in order to greenlight the two new members.

Turkey says it has concerns about terrorism in Finland and Sweden, and that it is not seeking leverage over the organisation.

The foreign minister also wants export bans to Turkey lifted.

Finland has announced it will apply to join NATO, and Sweden is expected to follow suit.

Speaking following the announcement they will be joining NATO, Finland’s prime minister said the move was necessary following the invasion of Ukraine.

Responding to a question from Sky News, Sanna Marin said: “When we look at Russia, we see a very different kind of Russia than we saw just a few months ago.

“Everything changed when Russia attacked Ukraine, and I personally think we cannot trust any more that there will be a peaceful future next to Russia with our own.

“That is why we are making the decision to join NATO.

“It’s an act of peace.”

She added: “We have had wars with Russia and we don’t want that kind of future for ourselves or for our children.”

So if you are looking for a new role, stick to these five resume fundamentals to give you the best chance of getting over the first recruitment hurdle

Nine-times-out-of-ten the first contact you will have with a potential employer is via your resume. And the 750 or so words you put on it will more often than not make or break your chances of success.

How to create a successful video resumegraphicstock

So how do you ensure you create an effective resume that will put your application to the top of the pile, and not in the bottom of the trash?

  • Back to basics

If you don’t cover off the basics, you are never going to get through the door for an interview. So all resumes should include past and current work history, educational and occupational qualifications, the skills you have that are relevant to the role on offer, examples of outside interests and hobbies, and the details of two contacts for references. Also, ensure you thoroughly proofread your resume and get it checked by a second pair of eyes for spelling and grammar errors.

  • Keep it short and sweet

It is always a huge temptation to cram in as much information as possible in an attempt to convince an employer that you are the perfect person for the position. But bear in mind that your application might be the 50th that he or she has read that day. And if yours runs to six pages of irrelevant information, typed in six point text, the chances are that it will not be well received. As a rule, keep it to two pages of A4, use a type size that won’t require a magnifying glass and write it in a professional font. So no comic sans!

  • Tailor-made tactics

Recruiters and senior management spend a lot of time wading through resumes and, believe me, they can spot from five paces a generic resume that has been fired out at random. Therefore, the key to a successful resume is tailoring your information to the job description and specification. This means you will have to highlight how your past roles and qualifications are suitable for this specific position. For example, if you are applying for a customer service role but your background is in sales, then emphasise how your account and client servicing skills gave you considerable experience in providing excellent customer service.

  • Strategy for skills

It’s important to remember that the skills required for a new job do not always need to come from previously paid positions. Of course, leadership, mentoring, strategic and technical skills from past employment need to be effectively highlighted, but it is often the case that these abilities can also be honed through volunteering, hobbies and participation with community groups. Employers are just as likely to be impressed by an applicant who has secured the relevant skills across depth and breadth of activities as they are with someone who has only grounded themselves in one specialism. Furthermore, when highlighting skills developed in previous roles, don’t be too technical in your descriptions, especially if you are looking to transition to a new sector or industry.

  • Tell the whole truth…

Ever had a role that did not work out as planned? Many of us have, so don’t feel the need to gloss over this or deny that it ever happened. Employers and recruiters are real people and will know that valuable lessons would have been learned by a role that didn’t work out. So, if you are worried that a three-month position will look bad on your resume and are tempted to exclude it, don’t. Simply explain the situation and what you learned from the experience. Good hiring managers will appreciate the honesty and openness. Also, it should go without saying that over-egging your past roles and claiming to have skills you don’t possess will more often than not end in tears.

When I applied for my first game studio job back in 2001, I knew that a good resume was important. Naturally I searched the Internet, hoping to find good advice and resume samples that worked. There wasn’t much out there back then. But what little I did find was conflicting and contradictory. Not helpful.

Functional or chronological? Combination or targeted? Formal or creative? MS Word or PDF? It shouldn’t have been so hard to get a straight answer.

That was a long time ago. Today, there’s 100 times more advice out there and it’s 1,000 times more conflicting and contradictory. Still not helpful!

Nothing speaks louder than an example that worked. So I dug through my archives to find actual resumes from people that applied while I was running the engineering department at a mid-sized game studio. They’re all very different in terms of layout, organization and styling, but they all have one important thing in common: They all got hired.

Let’s take a look and see what we can learn from these resumes that are – by definition – winners. I think we’ll see some surprising patterns that can get you hired, too.

(Note: I’ve changed the details of the names/genders, schools, games, and so on to protect the privacy of the applicants. But the layouts, overall structure and tone are intact.)

Game Developer Resume #1: Game student with broad tastes and diverse systems experience

Why did this game programmer resume catch my eye?

  • It’s hard to find a candidate who’s good at programming systems as well as gameplay. This candidate has done both.
  • He lists a fairly diverse batch of genres and scopes in his “favorite games” section. The studio I was hiring for had 12 teams all working on different types of games, so I wanted somebody who wouldn’t be a snob about what kinds of games they worked on.
  • I gravitate toward coders that have experience in different roles on a team, such as designer and producer. It helps them see things from the viewpoint of the non-engineers on their team, which makes them a better communicator.

Game Developer Resume #2: Computer geek with leadership potential

What did I find intriguing about this engineering resume?

  • I often look for candidates that could become lead programmers later in their career. This candidate was working at a retail store, and hints that leadership and customer support – two things that make for a great team lead – might be a strong suit.
  • There are hints that the candidate might enjoy the process of planning software – UML, task lists, etc. – in addition to coding it. That’s a good sign for a potential project lead.
  • I’m not thrilled with the giant “core competencies” section that lists every piece of software ever touched. I get it, it’s not for me. It’s for the search engines. But I don’t recommend it. It wastes a lot of space without helping me understand what makes the candidate special.

Game Developer Resume #3: Graphics specialist with strong 3D math chops

This is a really strong game developer resume.

  • For starters, he has a degree from a game school and experience in QA on a professional game team. His time in QA will have given him insight into the game dev process, and shows he’s passionate enough to do a non-programming job if that’s what it takes to break in.
  • Through all of his projects, he tackled complicated 3D-math-heavy features. That’s a good sign that he’s smart and motivated. Also, a surprising number of game programmers aren’t great with 3D math, so it’s always handy to have a ringer on the team.
  • He’s heavy on graphics experience. At the time, the studio I was hiring for was low on good graphics programmers. He’s applied at the right place at the right time.

What do these resumes have in common?

These game developer resumes are very different. And in reality, the candidates went on to have very different career paths, each built around their individual strengths and interests. So at first it might seem there’s not a lot you can learn by studying them.

But from a higher-level view, they actually have a lot in common.

  1. They all have a degree from a video game school. That’s not a requirement, but it helped me feel more confident that they know what they’re doing.
  2. They all have experience working on real projects with real teams. Even if it’s just part of their schooling, it’s important to show they have the social and team skills to work under a deadline – without killing themselves or their teammates.
  3. They all have qualities that I was specifically looking for, for my specific studio and teams. It might seem that it’s hard to know what a hiring manager is looking for. But you can always do a little research to find out what a studio needs, then orient your resume to highlight that portion of your skill set.

What can we learn from game developer resumes?

Those are the similarities. But maybe there’s something to learn from the differences? Sure, they all have completely different layouts and formatting. But they all get their point across. They show who they are, and what they can do.

And they all got hired.

So the real lesson might be this: The layout of your resume isn’t as important as everyone wants you to think. It’s the content that counts, not the tabs, fonts and margins. Fonts don’t get you hired! Being awesome gets you hired. Show them who you are, why you’re great, and why they should hire you. Get that part right, and nothing else matters.

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Image: Just2shutter/freedigitalphotos.net

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Making games for a living is an incredibly rewarding career, but it’s hard to break in unless you have insider knowledge. This book levels the playing field.

Recruiters look at dozens of resumes a day. If they see something they don’t like, your resume could wind up in the “no” pile in just seconds.

Here are a few tips you should follow to make your resume better than the rest, standing out from all that competition!

1. Make Sure Your Resume Is Error-Free

We know that sounds like a no-brainer, but you might be surprised by the number of resumes that have a spacing issue, a punctuation error, or even a misspelling. The problem is that you have looked at your resume so many times, your brain knows what it is supposed to say, but in reality, it says something else.

Get several people to proofread your resume, and have them read it for different purposes. One person should read for grammar, for example, and another should read for punctuation and spelling. You cannot afford to send a resume to employers with mistakes. Any superficial error can severely hurt your chances of getting a call for that job.

2. Align Your Resume With The Description Of The Job You’re Applying For

Too often people think that their resume is a “one and done” proposition. Not so! You should customize your resume for every job each time you apply.

Match up keywords from the job description with keywords in your resume. Make sure that your achievements and successes indicate that you are an excellent candidate for the job you’re applying for. You need to tweak your resume for every single job posting. There are no exceptions.

3. Make Your Resume Sleek

Some people think the trick to a great resume is to stuff as many accomplishments as possible into it by using tiny font and stretching the margins to the limit. The result is a resume that is difficult to read and looks cluttered and clunky. Those resumes will wind up in the “no” pile because the hiring manager doesn’t care enough to search the document for truly relevant information. They also don’t have time to waste when there are dozens of other resumes to review.

Your resume should have a clean and contemporary look and feel. Use lots of white space and be as concise as possible. Also, use clean-looking fonts like Calibri or Arial.

4. Use Keywords Strategically

Check the job description carefully for each position you’re applying for. Then, use keywords in your resume that match keywords in the job description. Also, you may find it helpful to use free word cloud tools to identify the keywords that are used most frequently in the job description. Adding those keywords to your resume will make it easier for you to get your resume past the ATS.

Recruiters and hiring managers are looking for individuals who are a good match for their job opening. Don’t make them guess whether or not you have the required skills or experience. Your resume should get them curious to know more about your qualifications. At the end of the day, the goal of your resume is to get the employer to call you. It won’t be the thing that gets you the job, but it will be what gets you an interview.

5. Describe Accomplishments, Not Responsibilities

Avoid using the word “responsible” in your resume. Instead, concentrate on specific and quantifiable accomplishments. For example, which sounds more impressive:

  • Responsible for manufacturing production with proven record of exceeding expectations.
  • Managed five different teams over the course of 10+ years resulting in $50 million in new sales along with a 30% reduction in waste.

6. Use “Power” Words

Demonstrate that you are a person of action. Rather than being “responsible for” something, use words like “advised,” “led,” “launched,” “executed,” “generated,” “planned,” “produced,” etc. These powerful resume words (and others like them) demonstrate your ability to perform on the job and your specific role in previous jobs. Strong action words validate your capabilities and specific duties you have performed.

Consider which is better:

  • Responsible for launch of a new product.
  • Initiated and led new product-launch that resulted in $20 million in revenue.

Don’t forget that your resume represents who you are and what you can do when you can’t be there in person to explain all of that to a recruiter or hiring manager. Your resume is just one of hundreds that fly into a company on any given day. You need to stand out from the crowd, and it is your responsibility to make that happen. By following the tips above, you’ll be sure to create a resume that’s better than the rest.

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

How to create a successful video resume

Social media is rapidly changing the way companies brand and market themselves as well as provide customer service. Though paid social continues to grow, organic social media management remains important as well! Since 2010, jobs with “social media” in the title tripled year over year, and the demand for these skills is not isolated to jobs with a social media title.

Being a social media manager requires a bit more knowledge than simply growing up friending your classmates on Facebook and tweeting puppy videos. The trick is creating the perfect social media resume—or spotting one—which identifies the skills needed to be a brand ambassador on social. When you find yourself needing to polish your resume, I’ve compiled a list of skills you should include—or brush up on before you interview!

1. Highlight Your Communication Skills

Social media is all about connections and communication. As more companies utilize social platforms for customer service, branding, and influencing, it is highly important to be able to present a branded persona to solve problems and communicate for the company. Even more importantly, communication is imperative to being part of a team! You’ll most likely be a member of a marketing team that will need you to effectively communicate what you need from them and how you can help them achieve their goals.

Your social media resume should also highlight your skills to appropriately choose a social platform for certain posts—i.e. Twitter for customer service questions, Facebook for larger company press releases and photos, LinkedIn for job openings and conference news.

An easy way to state this on your resume? Place something similar to the below in your social media skills list:

  • Proficient in Social Media Targeting and Communication
  • Engage customers and target prospects on social platforms while leveraging influencers

2. Brag About Your Copywriting Skills

I am a firm believer that grammar and spelling knowledge go a long way in any profession, but if you make a living being a professional social media star, you better get it right! There is nothing more embarrassing than typos or grammar mistakes. Personally, I love using Grammarly—it’s a free plugin that spell checks as you go. When you’re dealing with an angry customer on twitter, you can make sure all your punctuation is in the right spot!

Moreover, copywriting should be exciting! You’re going to have limited space—or characters—to communicate an offer or witty update. Brush up on your vocabulary and be prepared to be a modern-day Hemingway on social media!

This should also take up residence in your “Skills” section on your resume:

  • Excellent copywriting and editing skills, close attention to detail

3. Get Creative

Let’s face it, social media can be boring. Despite Facebook’s best efforts to make the Newsfeed show relevant posts, most people spend most their time scrolling to find something interesting in their feeds. As a social media expert, you should have the creative juices to make your posts stand out from the crowd, getting clicks and likes and retweets.

The easiest way to do this? Make your resume stand out! Check out these out-of-the-box examples of creative social media resumes:

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How to create a successful video resume

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How to create a successful video resume

Do you know what happens to most of the resumes you send to the recruiters? They end up in the pile in the dustbin. That’s why you are not getting the interview calls you expect. How can you stop that from happening — and how can you make your resume stand out as well as increase the chances of getting interview calls?

If you can make your resume interesting and help it to stand out in the crowd, you are more likely to accomplish your goals of getting more interview calls. Most of the resumes are boring because they follow similar format and styles. Is there any way to spice up a boring resume and make it look more attractive to the recruiters? How can you make your resume stand out in a pile of resumes?

If you want to be unique, then you will need to take some risks.

The next time you are applying for a job, you need to — first and foremost — do this: Focus On The Job Title of the Job You’re Applying For.

How do you do that?

You can do that by adding some descriptive words to your job title. Make it interesting — make it stand out. Recruiters often only look at your resume for just a few seconds. So you have only a few seconds to make a positive impression — and you can do that with your resume title. Your resume title can get that necessary first glance and create an important interest for recruiters.

Here’s an example that will help you understand this idea better…

Instead of writing “Content Writer” why not write “Content Writer for XYZ Corporation,” if the XYZ corporation is a well-known name. You can also write “Content Writer with 5 Years Experience,” or “Content Writer with Marketing Background,” or “Content Writer with HTML Skills.” They may just be a few words — but they are the words that can get the attention of the recruiters. Adding those words in your resume title can do the trick for you.

Here are some other examples:

  • Instead of “Internet Marketer” as your resume title, why not have “Internet Marketer with AdWords Certification.”
  • Instead of “Marketing Manager” as your resume title, why not have “Marketing Manager with Online Marketing Experience.”

Why does it work?

This looks like a very small trick…but it works. It works because it helps the recruiters see something that they are not finding with the other hundreds of candidates. It shows you as unique, different, and proactive — and recruiters love those traits. Show that you are really interested in the opening and recruiters will look to call you for an interview.

It helps if you write about your experience and expertise without the recruiters having to read the whole resume. It saves the recruiters’ time, making the screening faster. And everybody loves to work less and get things done faster….right?

Conclusion

So, the next time you are sending your resume in for any job, customize it for the job and search. Find and use attention-grabbing and important words in the resume title. Try it a few times and you will see the difference. The recruiters will also notice the difference, improving and increasing the chances of getting you that elusive job interview.

(Photo credit: My Resume via Shutterstock)

Videos can help you connect with employers but may also lead to bias

by Kenneth Terrell, AARP, February 14, 2022

How to create a successful video resume

If you’re updating your résumé, it also might be time to consider making a video version.

Actually, a so-called video résumé is more like a cover letter. In a short digital video, you introduce yourself and make a quick pitch on the skills and experience you can offer an employer.

While most hiring managers won’t expect to you to send a video, employers in information technology or creative fields like advertising might ask to see one. Other businesses might soon join in. Last year, the viral-video giant TikTok partnered with companies such as Chipotle, Shopify, Target and others to test a TikTok Resumes pilot program. Users were asked to record a short clip about who they are and why employers should hire them and post the video with the hashtag #TikTokResumes. Employers could then search the hashtag to find candidates who might fit current job openings.

Here’s one example of what a TikTok résumé looks like:

Of course, many TikTok users are from Generation Z, which suggests a dilemma video résumés might pose for older adults. Job seekers 50 and older are advised to remove anything that might reveal their age from their résumé and application materials to avoid discrimination. If hiring managers can see you up front, they likely can approximate your age based on your appearance. And research shows that age discrimination often begins at first sight.

“One concern about video résumés is that they could exacerbate age discrimination and bias,” says Susan Weinstock, AARP’s vice president of financial resilience programming. “Video résumés can make it very easy for an employer to determine the age of an applicant. If they can see via video résumés that an applicant is — or appears to be — age 40 or older, they could decide to unlawfully reject that applicant.”

That means if you’re an older adult, you should put extra thought into whether a video résumé is a good way to introduce yourself to employers. A video résumé could still be a fine showcase for your talents if, for example, you have experience giving successful sales pitches or other presentations.

If you do choose to create a video résumé, the following advice can help you produce one that makes you stand out from other applicants.

Write your script and keep it short.

Remember, your video should work like a traditional cover letter, introducing who you are along with a few details about your skills.

Don’t worry about specifics, such as job titles and dates. Your traditional résumé — which you still must submit — will cover those. Instead, think of what you might say to someone you’ve just met to tell them what you do for a living and why you’re good at it. A video résumé also can be a good place to put a personal spin on details that might be overlooked or considered negatives on a conventional one. For instance, if you took time off to provide caregiving for a loved one or you are a veteran switching to civilian work, a confident statement in your video might be more compelling than the same information presented in writing.

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Practice your general pitch out loud on your family and friends, and use their feedback to sharpen it. You want your video to be as personable as possible, so your colleagues can help you figure out which parts don’t sound quite natural.

You don’t need to memorize your script, but you should be familiar enough with it that you can recite your points without having to read directly from it. Don’t worry: Experts recommend that a finished video résumé should be only 30 to 90 seconds in length, so perfecting your pitch shouldn’t be too difficult.

Get ready to record your video.

Once you know what you want to say, think about how you want your video résumé to look. The simplest format is to make your pitch directly to the camera, all in one take. But even that approach requires some planning. For example, make sure you are dressed appropriately, as you would be for a job interview.

You’ll also have to put some thought into your setting. Filming in your current employer’s workplace is a no-no, of course. If you choose your home office or someplace else in your residence, make sure the background is clean and not distracting. Also consider whether there are suitable spaces in your neighborhood where you might be permitted to film. For example, public libraries, community centers and even some businesses often are glad to help job seekers, if you make your request in advance.

The next big decision is what technology to use to record your video. You may already have the necessary tools. In many cases, the camera on your smartphone will capture better picture and sound quality than your laptop computer, but it does take some experience to get the most out of either of these. If you’re not sure you have the necessary skill, reach out to your social and professional networks to find someone who might be willing to help. Just like your traditional résumé and cover letter, your video résumé should be as polished as possible.

If you have video editing know-how or someone to help you, you can further sharpen your résumé by adding brief footage of yourself giving presentations in meetings or conferences, receiving awards or otherwise showing off your skills.

Where and when to use your video.

Once you’re happy with the final version of your video résumé, the first place you might put it is on your LinkedIn profile. That will make the video easily accessible to employers from the contact information on your traditional résumé. It might also help you get noticed by recruiters who use the site to find potential applicants. Setting up a LinkedIn profile is free.

Of course, you also can send the video directly to employers as either an email attachment to the hiring manager or through the company’s online application form where requested.

Need a couple of examples to help you get started? Here are two illustrations of what a finished video résumé might look like.

How to create a successful video resume

Many of the changes the pandemic brought to the way we work seem likely to stick around, some perhaps permanently. Remote work and virtual recruiting are among them, which means your next job interview may happen via video.

Whether you’re an old hand with years of traditional interviewing experience or this is your first time in the job market, a video interview doesn’t have to be a stressor. Yes, there are distinct nuances you need to understand. But with some practice and the right mindset, you can put yourself in a position to shine as easily as you would in a face-to-face interview.

Below are eight video job interview tips that can help you advance to the next round.

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1. Test your technology

A few days before your interview, do a technology test run to make sure your equipment is working correctly. Download any apps or plugins you’ll need. Whether you’re using Zoom, Microsoft Teams or another video platform, make sure you have a username that’s professional, just as you would with your email address or social media handle. This is a detail that has famously gotten a few people into trouble, but it’s an easy mistake to avoid.

Check to make sure your computer’s camera, microphone and internet connection are working. Do a trial run with a friend or family member, if possible, so you have ample time to adjust if your equipment or software isn’t working properly.

2. Charge it up

If you’re using a laptop or tablet, make sure it’s fully charged on the day of the interview. And pick a spot that has strong Wi-Fi. If you’re using a tablet, find a way to keep it stationary. Otherwise, the screen may appear shaky if you’re holding the device. Avoid using a smartphone for video interviews if at all possible.

3. Dress for success

Dress as you would for an in-person interview — from head to toe. Doing so will make you feel more confident. Don’t try the old newscaster trick of wearing a blazer with sweatpants assuming you’ll only be seen from the waist up (you never know). Also, avoid wearing bright, flashy colors, and choose something that looks neatly pressed while you’re sitting down. Wear your video interview outfit during your trial run so you can get feedback from your friend or family member about how it looks onscreen.

4. Set the stage for a distraction-free video interview

Choose a location that’s free from the distractions of children, roommates or pets. Hang a sign on the door asking mail carriers and package deliverers not to ring the doorbell.

Make sure the background is free from clutter and embarrassing items like laundry piles. Set up lighting that’s bright but not glaring, illuminating your face from the front. Natural light is best.

Turn off email, text and social media alerts, software updates and other notifications that may pop up on the screen during the interview. Turn off programs that might interfere with the webcam, and close browser tabs.

5. Be a well-prepared early bird

Before you join the interview, make sure you don’t have any filters on that might make you look like a cat or anything other than yourself, and that you don’t have an unprofessional-looking virtual background on.

When the time for your interview approaches, log in five or 10 minutes early so you can be calm and centered when the video interview begins. Have your resume handy, along with the job description and any speaking points you want to hit or notes you’ve taken about the company or position. You won’t want to read directly from them, but having everything right there can take away some stress.

Expect to field some common interview questions, including:

6. Maintain good eye contact and body language

It’s easier for your eyes to wander when the person you’re talking to isn’t in the room. Maintain virtual eye contact by looking directly into the camera instead of at the screen or at your own photo. Make sure your face is centered and try not to move around too much. Keep good posture, sitting with your back straight, feet on the ground and arms resting in your lap or on the desk.

7. Project and pause

Project your voice. Check your volume controls and speak clearly so the microphone picks up your voice and the interviewer doesn’t have to strain to hear you. And remember that digital connections can sometimes be delayed. To avoid talking over the interviewer or having your first few words cut out, let the interviewer finish the question and then pause for a couple seconds before delivering your answer.

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8. End the video interview with appreciation

Just as you would with any interview, thank the interviewer for the opportunity, and follow up with a post-interview thank-you note within 24 hours. In your note, briefly reinforce why you’re interested in the job and why you’d be a great match for the role and company. Include something that you and the employer discussed while getting to know each other that’ll make the thank-you message more personal. Establishing that kind of rapport with the hiring manager, especially after the video interview, can make all the difference in advancing to the next round.

And now, a virtual word from Paul McDonald, Robert Half senior executive director.

Article Content

Article Content

In the world of online teaching, it is important to make your teacher profile stand out. One of the most powerful ways to make yourself appealing to potential students is to post a video introduction of yourself. Having an introduction video on your profile creates a more personal connection right away and it is a great way to build rapport with students looking for a teacher.

An introduction video provides a preview of your unique characteristics and what it’ll be like to work with you. Students are attracted to teachers who are easy to speak with and are passionate about their subject. Videos enable you to quickly build a bond that can set the stage for that perfect teacher-student match.

Here are 10 steps to create a captivating introduction video:

How to create a successful video resume

1. Plan out what you want to say, don’t be afraid to let your personality shine (+SCRIPTS).

A great script is essential to a great video. Your script should introduce you to prospective students and convey your objective, professional experience, and most marketable skills. Communicate these points in less than a minute, 30 seconds or less is best.

Here are some points to include in your script:

  • Your name
  • Where you are from
  • What subjects you teach ( If you are a language teacher you might say a few words in the language you are teaching)
  • Your teaching experience
  • Why you love teaching
  • In conclusion offer a Call to Action: “Book a lesson”. “Try a Fresh Trial lesson”

Please make sure not to provide personal contact info or promote or advertise other services in your video. If using media or music make sure it is royalty-free.

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Speech script examples

If you are looking for an example of a good teacher self-introduction speech, have a look at the two different scripts below. You can adapt them to make your own, always taking in mind that your speech should not last longer than a minute. It is a good idea to write down your teacher self-introduction text and practice reading it many times in order to memorize it before you shoot your video.

Speech Script 1:

Speech Script 2:

2. Use a digital camera, your smartphone, or the webcam on your computer to film.

Shoot in high definition or 1080p to ensure the video quality is good. If using a phone make sure it is placed horizontally to record full width.

The 5 best FREE video editing websites

It is simply not true that you have to pay for top-notch quality video editing services. There are plenty of desktop-based editing software programs available for free that offer excellent features. Here are five of them:

  • OpenShot: A useful tool for beginners, OpenShot is an easy-to-use video editor with an intuitive interface and a minimal design that will allow you to do simple edits like resizing, scaling, and trimming.
  • VSDC: VSDC is a video editing software that offers a full editing suite, including green-screen video effects and a stabilization tool, which is perfect for improving the quality of shaky smartphone clips.
  • Lightworks: Lightworks is a user-friendly editor, which also offers a collection of detailed video tutorials. Lightworks allows you to import background footage and preview video effects in real-time.
  • Shortcut: Shortcut is an open-source video editor that supports many formats and offers a large collection of tutorial videos. It is mostly known for its audio-editing options, which will appeal to creators without special mics and audio equipment.
  • HitFilm Express: HitFilm Express is a state-of-the-art video editor with all-in-one editing and professional visual effects and tutorials. This tool goes way beyond offering basic features like adjusting colors and trimming and delivers a professional editing experience.

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3. Make sure you shoot in a good light.

Along with a great script, good lighting is one of the most important components in creating a stellar video.

We recommend filming indoors in a well-lit room with plenty of light in front of you or to the side of you. Natural light is fine. Make sure you don’t have strong light behind you. If there’s lighting above you, make sure it doesn’t cast shadows on your face. A tabletop lamp can help offset any shadows.

4. Clear away tabletop and background clutter.

The focus of the video should be you, not the things around you. Also, make sure you’re in a quiet place (e.g., no children at play, electric fans, etc.) because your mic will pick up the sounds and make your video hard to watch.

5. Frame your video.

Now that you have your camera, lighting, and background ready, it’s time to frame the shot. Place the camera so you’ll be slightly off-center in the frame. It may sound counterintuitive, but it’ll better capture the viewer’s attention when you’re standing slightly to the left or right of the center.

Also, shoot from the waist up and make sure your face and hand gestures are visible as you talk in the video.