How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

You can list and organize the figures, pictures, or tables in your Word document by creating a table of figures, much like a table of contents. First add captions to your figures, and then use the Insert Table of Figures command on the References tab. Word then searches the document for your captions and automatically adds a list of figures, sorted by page number.

Before you begin

Before you create a table of figures, you must add captions to all the figures and tables that you want included in your table of figures. For more information, see Add, format, or delete captions in Word.

Insert a table of figures

Click in your document where you want to insert the table of figures.

Click References > Insert Table of Figures.

Note: If your Word document is not maximized, the Insert Table of Figures option might not be visible. Some minimized views show only the Insert Table of Figures icon .

You can adjust your Format and Options in the Table of Figures dialog box. Click OK.

Update a table of figures

If you add, delete, change, or move captions, use Update Table so the table of figures reflects your changes.

Click on the table of figures in your document. This will highlight the entire table.

Click References > Update Table.

Note: Update Table becomes an option only when you click the table of figures in your document. You can also press F9 to update your table of figures.

Select an Update in the in the Update Table of Figures dialog box.

Select Update page numbers if you need to adjust the page numbers.

Select Update entire table if you have moved figures or altered captions.

These are the basic types of graphics that you can use to enhance your Word documents: drawing objects, SmartArt, charts, pictures, and clip art. Drawings refer to a drawing object or a group of drawing objects.

Drawing objects include shapes, diagrams, flowcharts, curves, lines, and WordArt. These objects are part of your Word document. You can change and enhance these objects with colors, patterns, borders, and other effects.

Note: It is no longer necessary to insert a drawing canvas to work with drawing objects in Word. However, you may still use a drawing canvas as an organizational aid when working with several drawing objects, or if you want to add connectors between shapes. To insert a drawing canvas, on the Insert tab, click Shapes, and then click New Drawing Canvas.

What do you want to do?

Add a drawing to a document

Click in your document where you want to create the drawing.

On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes.

You can do any of the following on the Format tab, which appears after you insert a drawing shape:

Insert a shape. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a shape, and then click somewhere in the document.

Change a shape. Click the shape you want to change. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click Edit Shape, point to Change Shape, and then choose a different shape.

Add text to a shape. Click the shape you where you want text, and then type.

Group selected shapes. Select several shapes at a time by pressing CTRL on your keyboard and clicking each shape you want to include in the group. On the Format tab in the Arrange group, click Group so that all of the shapes will be treated like a single object.

Draw in the document. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, expand the shapes options by clicking the arrow. Under Lines click Freeform or Scribble.

Tip: To stop drawing with the Freeform or Scribble lines, double-click.

Adjust the size of the shapes. Select the shape or shapes you want to resize. On the Format tab, in the Size group, click the arrows or type new dimensions in the Height and Width boxes.

Apply a style to a shape. In the Shape Styles group, rest your pointer over a style to see what your shape will look like when you apply that style. Click the style to apply it. Or, click Shape Fill or Shape Outline and select the options that you want.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Note: If you want to apply a color and gradient that aren’t available in the Shape Styles group, select the color first, and then apply the gradient.

Add flow charts with connectors. Before you create a flow chart, add a drawing canvas by clicking the Insert tab, clicking Shapes in the Illustrations group, and then clicking New Drawing Canvas. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a Flow chart shape. Under Lines, choose a connector line such as the Curved Arrow Connector.

Use shadow and three-dimensional (3-D) effects to add interest to the shapes in your drawing. On the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click Shape Effects, and choose an effect.

Align the objects on the canvas. To align the objects, press and hold CTRL while you select the objects that you want to align. On the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Align to choose from an assortment of alignment commands.

Delete all or part of a drawing

Select the drawing object that you want to delete.

See also

What do you want to do?

Add a drawing to a document

Click in your document where you want to create the drawing.

On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes.

When you find the shape you want to insert, double-click to insert it automatically, or click and drag to draw it in your document.

You can do any of the following on the Format tab, which appears after you insert a drawing shape:

Insert a shape. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a shape, and then click somewhere in the document.

Change a shape. Click the shape you want to change. On the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click Change Shape, and then choose a different shape.

Add text to a shape. Right-click the shape, click Add Text, and then type.

Group selected shapes. Select several shapes at a time by pressing CTRL on your keyboard and clicking each shape you want to include in the group. On the Format tab in the Arrange group, click Group so that all of the shapes will be treated like a single object.

Draw in the document. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, expand the shapes options by clicking the arrow. Under Lines click Freeform or Scribble.

Adjust the size of the shapes. Select the shape or shapes you want to resize. On the Format tab, in the Size group, click the arrows or type new dimensions in the Shape Height and Shape Width boxes.

Apply a style to a shape. In the Shape Styles group, rest your pointer over a style to see what your shape will look like when you apply that style. Click the style to apply it. Or, click Shape Fill or Shape Outline and select the options that you want.

Note: If you want to apply a color and gradient that aren’t available in the Shape Styles group, select the color first, and then apply the gradient.

Add flow charts with connectors. Before you create a flow chart, add a drawing canvas by clicking the Insert tab, clicking Shapes in the Illustrations group, and then clicking New Drawing Canvas. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a Flow chart shape. Under Lines, choose a connector line such as the Curved Arrow Connector.

Use shadow and three-dimensional (3-D) effects to add interest to the shapes in your drawing. On the Format tab, choose an option in either the Shadow Effects or the 3-D Effects group.

Align the objects on the canvas. To align the objects, press and hold CTRL while you select the objects that you want to align. On the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Align to choose from an assortment of alignment commands.

Delete all or part of a drawing

Select the drawing object that you want to delete.

Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

A table of figures is a list, sorted by page number, of the captions pulled from figures, images, or tables in your document. It’s like a table of contents, but it’s a table of anything to which you can add a caption.

Insert a Table of Figures

Adding a table of figures is a useful tool for allowing the reader to quickly navigate to specific parts of the document (or as a personal quick reference guide). This is especially true for longer documents with an excessive amount of media. It’s important to note, however, that adding a table of figures is only possible if you add captions (not to be confused with alternative text) to your figures, images, and tables. We’ll assume that you have already captioned the relevant material in your Word document in this example.

Once you’re ready to insert your table of figures, go ahead and click the location of the document in which you would like the table to be added. Next, head over to the “References” tab and select “Insert Table of Figures.”

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Once selected, the “Table of Figures” window will appear, displaying the print and web preview of the table of figures. Here, you can also adjust several options and customize the format of the table.

Once you’ve tweaked your settings, click “OK.”

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Your table of figures will now be inserted in your Word doc.

Update a Table of Figures

Understandably, your captioned objects may move around as you add, remove, and edit content in the document. As a result, Word also provides a straightforward way to update the table of figures to reflect any changes made.

To update your table of figures, you’ll first need to select it. If you don’t select the table, then the update option won’t be available. Once the table of figures is selected, head over to the “References” tab and click “Update Table.” Alternatively, you can press F9.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Now, the “Update Table of Figures” dialogue box will appear. Here, you’re able to update the entire table or only the page numbers. Select the option that works best for you and then click “OK.”

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Your table of figures will now be updated to reflect the current version of the document.

August 17, 2011 by Sue Huckle

The Microsoft Office ribbon is a completely new interface…not only a new look, but new terminology, too.

This part of the series will familiarize you with the names of the parts of the ribbon.

This is Part 1 of the ribbon series. If you missed the short introduction, follow the link below to get caught up.

  • Intro:Getting Started
  • Part 1: The Parts of the Ribbon
  • Part 2:How to Use the Ribbon
  • Part 3:Customize the Office Ribbon
  • Part 4:Ribbon Help and Troubleshooting

Let’s get started!

The power of the Microsoft Office Ribbon

You may not realize the hidden power of the ribbon bar—all of those toolbar icons open up windows such as menus, dialog boxes, and task panes.

The Word 2007 Paragraph Dialog Box: Look familiar? If you have used Word before, it should! This 2007 dialog box looks just like the 2003 version.

Many of these windows are literally unchanged from Microsoft Word 2003. So once you open them, you should be in familiar territory if you have used Word before.

The Microsoft Office interface is very similar from program to program. The tabs and groups are different depending on what program you are using, however the way you use the ribbon is identical. So once you learn the ribbon in Microsoft Word, it will be easier to learn it in the other Office programs.

The parts of the Microsoft Office Ribbon

It’s time to get familiar with the Microsoft Office interface!

Elements always visible in the Office Ribbon

For a discussion about each element, refer to the numbered descriptions.

  1. Office Button: the Office button hides the Office menu and Word options menu. Click this button to find the open, save, print, and other menu items.
  2. Quick Access Toolbar: the Quick Access Toolbar is a customizable toolbar that shows either above or below the ribbon. It is always in view even when the ribbon is minimized.
  3. Tabs: the Office ribbon is organized into tabs according to task. Tabs always in view include Home, Insert, Page Layout, References, Mailings, Review, and View. The Add-Ins tab is visible when you have add-ins installed. Showing the Developer tab in the ribbon is optional—the tab must be added manually, but once it is added, it is always in view in all Office programs that use the ribbon.
  4. Groups: each tab is divided into logical groups of buttons. The most popular buttons show in the ribbon. Some groups have additional options that are accessed by clicking a launcher.
  5. Dialog Box Launcher: clicking the launcher icon opens dialog boxes and task panes.
  1. Gallery: galleries contain preset formatting options for tables, WordArt, charts, SmartArt, and more.
  2. More Buttons and Arrows: More buttons expand galleries. Plain arrows (such as the one shown on the Change Styles button) open galleries or submenus.
  3. Collapsed Group: groups expand and collapse when the document window is resized. A partially collapsed group may display the buttons in a different layout, or a reduced number of items. A fully collapsed group only shows the group name with an arrow button that opens the group submenu.
  4. Help Button: the Help button links to the embedded Word 2007 help files.
  5. Program Window Controls: the window controls work the same as other Microsoft Windows-based program. Clicking the minimize button (-) minimizes the program to the taskbar; the maximize button toggles between full-screen and reduced-size views; and clicking the X button exits the program.

Elements not always visible in the Office Ribbon

  • Contextual Tabs: these colored formatting tabs appear on the ribbon when certain items, such as pictures, are selected. They disappear when the item is deselected.
  • Galleries: the only gallery that is always in view is the Style gallery. Other galleries appear in Contextual tabs when certain items are selected, such as tables or WordArt, or when arrow buttons are clicked.
  • Task Panes and Dialog Boxes: task panes and dialog boxes appear when certain buttons or the dialog box launcher inside a group is clicked.

Now that you know the parts of the Microsoft Office ribbon, it’s time to find out how to use them…

Go to Part 2 of the Ribbon Series: Microsoft Word 2007 Ribbon Tutorial »

Make pictures, charts, or other objects align on the page, or with each other, by using “snap to” commands.

Snap to options only work in Print Layout.

Turn on the snap-to options

Select a chart, picture, or object in the document.

On the right end of the ribbon, select Format > Align > Grid Settings.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The Grid and Guides dialog box appears.

Turn on one or both of these options:

Snap objects to grid when the gridlines are not displayed

Positions an object to the closest intersection of the grid even when the grid is not visible.

Snap objects to other objects

Make an object align with other objects as you’re dragging it onscreen.

Turn off the snap-to options

Click a chart, picture, or object in the document.

On the right end of the ribbon, select Format > Align > Grid Settings.

The Grid and Guides dialog box appears.

To turn off the Snap objects to grid when the gridlines are not displayed or Snap objects to other objects settings, clear the respective box.

Adjust the size of the grid

You can change the distance between gridlines shown on the page by adjusting horizontal and vertical spacing.

Select a chart, picture, or object in the document.

On the right end of the ribbon, select Format > Align > Grid Settings.

Under Grid Settings, change the measurement in the Horizontal spacing or Vertical spacing box.

You can type a measurement in the box or use the up or down arrow on the right side of the box.

Tips about the grid and guides

To temporarily override the snap-to options, hold down ALT while you drag the chart, picture, or object.

If you want the current settings in the Grid and Guides dialog box to be the default settings for all documents, click Set As Default.

By default, shapes and other objects will snap to the nearest intersection of gridlines only if the grid is visible. Change that by checking the Snap objects to grid when the gridlines are not displayed box.

Do you want to create a solution that extends the functionality of Word? For example, one that involves automated document assembly? Or a solution that binds to and accesses data in a Word document from other data sources? You can use the Office Add-ins platform, which includes the Word JavaScript API and the Office JavaScript API, to extend Word clients running on a Windows desktop, on a Mac, or in the cloud.

Word add-ins are one of the many development options that you have on the Office Add-ins platform. You can use add-in commands to extend the Word UI and launch task panes that run JavaScript that interacts with the content in a Word document. Any code that you can run in a browser can run in a Word add-in. Add-ins that interact with content in a Word document create requests to act on Word objects and synchronize object state.

If you plan to publish your add-in to AppSource and make it available within the Office experience, make sure that you conform to the Commercial marketplace certification policies.В For example, to pass validation, your add-in must work across all platforms that support the methods that you define (for more information, see section 1120.3 and the Office Add-in application and availability page).

The following figure shows an example of a Word add-in that runs in a task pane.

Figure 1. Add-in running in a task pane in Word

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The Word add-in can (1) send requests to the Word document and (2) use JavaScript to access the paragraph object and update, delete, or move the paragraph. For example, the following code shows how to append a new sentence to that paragraph.

You can use any web server technology to host your Word add-in, such as ASP.NET, NodeJS, or Python. Use your favorite client-side framework — Ember, Backbone, Angular, React — or stick with VanillaJS to develop your solution, and you can use services like Azure to authenticate and host your application.

The Word JavaScript APIs give your application access to the objects and metadata found in a Word document. You can use these APIs to create add-ins that target:

  • Word 2013 or later on Windows
  • Word on the web
  • Word 2016 or later on Mac
  • Word on iPad

Write your add-in once, and it will run in all versions of Word across multiple platforms. For details, see Office client application and platform availability for Office Add-ins.

JavaScript APIs for Word

You can use two sets of JavaScript APIs to interact with the objects and metadata in a Word document. The first is the Common API, which was introduced in Office 2013. Many of the objects in the Common API can be used in add-ins hosted by two or more Office clients. This API uses callbacks extensively.

The second is the Word JavaScript API. This is a application-specific API model that was introduced with Word 2016. It’s a strongly-typed object model that you can use to create Word add-ins that target Word 2016 and later on Mac and on Windows. This object model uses promises and provides access to Word-specific objects like body, content controls, inline pictures, and paragraphs. The Word JavaScript API includes TypeScript definitions and vsdoc files so that you can get code hints in your IDE.

Currently, all Word clients support the shared Office JavaScript API, and most clients support the Word JavaScript API. For details about supported clients, see Office client application and platform availability for Office Add-ins.

We recommend that you start with the Word JavaScript API because the object model is easier to use. Use the Word JavaScript API if you need to:

  • Access the objects in a Word document.

Use the shared Office JavaScript API when you need to:

  • Target Word 2013.
  • Perform initial actions for the application.
  • Check the supported requirement set.
  • Access metadata, settings, and environmental information for the document.
  • Bind to sections in a document and capture events.
  • Use custom XML parts.
  • Open a dialog box.

Next steps

Ready to create your first Word add-in? See Build your first Word add-in. Use the add-in manifest to describe where your add-in is hosted, how it is displayed, and define permissions and other information.

To learn more about how to design a world-class Word add-in that creates a compelling experience for your users, see Design guidelines and Best practices.

After you develop your add-in, you can publish it to a network share, an app catalog, or AppSource.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Stop a Microsoft Word Table or Row from Breaking Across Pages

by Avantix Learning Team | Updated January 21, 2021

Applies to: Microsoft ® Word ® 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365 (Windows)

There are a few ways to keep a Microsoft Word row or table together on one page. When you want to stop a Word table from breaking across pages, the method you use depends on several factors including the size of the table. You can’t, for example, keep a table on one page if the table is larger than a page. Here, we’re also assuming the table is in the body of the document, not the header or footer.

Do you want to learn more about Microsoft Word? Check out our virtual classroom or live classroom Word courses >

Stopping a table row from breaking across pages using Table Properties

If you want to simply stop a table row from breaking across pages, you can change the Table Properties:

  1. Select the row or rows that should not break across pages (you may want to select the entire table).
  2. Click the Table Tools Layout tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click Properties. You can also right-click and choose Properties from the context-sensitive menu. A dialog box appears.
  4. Click the Row tab. Uncheck the check box to Allow row to break across pages.
  5. Click OK.

Below is the Table Properties dialog box with the Row tab selected:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Keeping table rows together by keeping lines and paragraphs together

Another way to keep a table row or rows together is to force paragraph(s) in cells to keep with the next paragraph(s) and / or to keep the lines of paragraph(s) together. A paragraph is anything with a hard return after it. Also, it’s usually a good idea to turn on Show/Hide ¶ (which appears in the Paragraph group on the Home tab in the Ribbon).

To keep a row or rows together using the keep with next paragraph and / or keep lines together settings:

  1. Select the cell or cells with the paragraph(s) you wish to keep with next paragraph and keep lines together.
  2. Click the Home tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click the dialog box launcher on the bottom right of the Paragraph group. The Paragraph dialog box appears.
  4. Click the Line and Page Breaks tab.
  5. Check Keep lines together to keep the lines of each paragraph together in the cell or cells you’ve selected.
  6. Check Keep with next to keep each paragraph in the cell or cells you’ve selected with the next paragraph. It’s usually best not to turn this option on for the last paragraph in the table as it will keep the paragraph in the last cell with the next paragraph following the table.
  7. Click OK.

Below is the Paragraph dialog box with the Line and Page Breaks tab selected:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Keeping a table together by starting it on a new page

Another way to keep a table together is to force the first paragraph in the table to start on a new page.

To force the first paragraph in a table to start on a new page:

  1. Select the first paragraph in the table.
  2. Click the Home tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click the dialog box launcher on the bottom right of the Paragraph group. The Paragraph dialog box appears.
  4. Click the Line and Page Breaks tab.
  5. Check Page break before.
  6. Click OK.

By the way, if you’re comfortable with styles, you could also use various paragraph settings in styles in your tables.

Other issues

If you’ve tried the strategies above and a table is still breaking across pages, there could be a number of reasons.

Ensure that the table is set so that it does not wrap around other text:

  1. Click in the table.
  2. Click the Table Tools Layout tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click Properties. You can also right-click and choose Properties from the context-sensitive menu.
  4. In the Table Properties dialog box, click the Table tab.
  5. Click None under Text wrapping.
  6. Click OK.

Below is the Table Properties dialog box with the Table tab selected:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

If a row is still breaking across pages, you may need to turn off the exact row height option:

  1. Select the row or rows that should not break across pages (you may want to select the entire table).
  2. Click the Table Tools Layout tab in the Ribbon.
  3. Click Properties. You can also right-click and choose Properties from the context-sensitive menu. A dialog box appears.
  4. Click the Row tab. Uncheck the check box to Allow row to break across pages.
  5. Uncheck Specify Height.
  6. Click OK.

You can also check for manual page breaks or section breaks in the table and delete them. However, be very careful deleting section breaks as they contain all information for the section.

To delete a page break or section break that has been inserted within a table:

  1. Ensure Show/Hide ¶ is turned on (which appears in the Paragraph group on the Home tab in the Ribbon).
  2. Select the problem page break or section break by dragging over it.
  3. Press Delete.

There can be some other issues like overly large indents in Table Properties so it’s worth checking the properties if you’re still having problems.

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Use the form controls in Word 2007 and 2003 to gather information from a group of people.

Former CNET contributor

Dennis O’Reilly began writing about workplace technology as an editor for Ziff-Davis’ Computer Select, back when CDs were new-fangled, and IBM’s PC XT was wowing the crowds at Comdex. He spent more than seven years running PC World’s award-winning Here’s How section, beginning in 2000. O’Reilly has written about everything from web search to PC security to Microsoft Excel customizations. Along with designing, building, and managing several different web sites, Dennis created the Travel Reference Library, a database of travel guidebook reviews that was converted to the web in 1996 and operated through 2000.

Microsoft Office includes industrial-strength tools for creating forms of all types, but the Access database and InfoPath information manager are overkill for my meager form requirements. If I need to collect basic information from a bunch of people in a hurry, such as for planning a potluck lunch, I stick with the simple form-creation tools in Word.

Word 2007 groups the options found on the Forms toolbar in Word 2003 into the Legacy Tools button in the Controls section under the Developer tab. These form fields are a subset of Office 2007’s Content Controls, which allow you to populate forms automatically from external sources, extract form data as XML for use in other applications, and perform other operations. I may have use for these advanced features someday, but for creating a basic form, they’re too much.

Start with a template and a table
Whether you’re using Word 2007 or Word 2003, create a template to serve as the master copy of your form document. The simplest way to format the form is by using a two-column table: The left column lists the field names, and the right one holds the data you’re collecting. In my example form for planning a company potluck lunch, I created fields for the respondent’s name, department, and preferred event date, as well as for the food and beverage each person plans to bring.

Text boxes work for the name, department, and food fields, and I use a drop-down menu for the beverage choice. I also use a drop-down menu for the date preference in Word 2003, but Word 2007 adds a control that lets people select a date from a monthly calendar.

To select a form control in Word 2007, place the cursor in the table cell where you want the control, click the Developer tab, and choose the appropriate icon in the Controls section, or click the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the Legacy Tools icon and select the control from the drop-down list.

Click the down arrow on the Legacy Tools icon to insert a form control. Microsoft

In Word 2003, place the cursor in the table cell you want the form field to appear in, right-click an empty area of the toolbar, select Forms to open the floating Forms toolbar, and choose one of the controls on the toolbar.

Select a control from the floating Forms toolbar to insert it in a document in Microsoft Word 2003. Microsoft

Once your form control is in place, right-click it and choose Properties to customize it. Another way to access the control options is by selecting the Properties button in the Controls section of the Developer ribbon in Word 2007, or by clicking the Form Field Options icon on the Forms toolbar in Word 2003. For text fields, you can change the default text that appears (by adding “Click here to enter text,” for example). You can also specify that a number, date, or other type of text be entered; set a maximum length; specify a text format; and even set a macro to run when data is entered, or when the field is exited. This is also how you enter items for drop-down lists, and set the size and default values of checkboxes.

Add items to the drop-down form control by entering them in the Field Options dialog box and clicking Add. Microsoft

There’s a more elegant way to ask people to select their preferred date in Word 2007: choose the Date Picker control, which adds a month-by-month calendar to the form that appears when you select it and choose the down arrow to the right of the current entry. The Content Properties dialog lets you specify the resulting date format.

Set the date format used in your form’s calendar control via its Properties dialog box in Word 2007. Microsoft

When your form controls are in place, save the file using the .dotx format in Word 2007, or .dot in Word 2003. When you’re ready to distribute your form, open a new Word document, and choose the template from the list that appears. Save the resulting file with the .docx format in Word 2007, or .doc in Word 2003. Now the form is ready for distribution, but first make sure your recipients can add text and otherwise access its fields. In Word 2007, place the cursor in the field, click the Properties button in the Contents section of the Developer ribbon (or right-click and choose Properties), and make sure “Contents cannot be edited” is unchecked. In Word 2003, ensure that the lock icon at the far right of the Forms toolbar is selected.

When the forms are returned, you can collect the data as comma-separated values in a text file (.txt) in Word 2003 by selecting File > Save As > Tools > Save Options, checking Save data only for forms, and clicking OK > Save > OK. In Word 2007 you should be able to do the same by clicking the Office button, choosing Save As > Word Document > Tools > Save Options, selecting the Advanced tab in the left pane, scrolling to the “Preserve fidelity when sharing this document” section in the right window, checking “Save form data as delimited text file,” choosing Plain text (.txt) in the Save as type drop-down menu, and clicking Save > OK. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get this function to save the form content when I tested it. I’ll keep experimenting, though, and I’ll let you know if I find the solution.

Tomorrow: Customize the Details view in Windows Explorer.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

In Microsoft Word, you can adjust list indents to expand the space from the left margin or that between the bullet or number and the text.

Depending on the type of Word document you’re creating, there may be more to creating a list than, well, creating a list. Maybe you want to use custom bullets for some pizzazz, or perhaps you want to define your list style from the start.

Another change you may want to make when using a list in Microsoft Word is to adjust the indent for the bullet points or numbers. For instance, you can adjust how far the points are indented from the left margin or alter the distance between the text and the bullet points.

Here, we’ll show you how to change indents in Word for an entire list and a single item.

How to Adjust the Indent for an Entire List

Whether you have your list complete or you’re still adding items to it, you can change the indent at any time. You can adjust the indent for both bulleted and numbered lists.

To adjust list indents in Word:

  1. Select the bullets or numbers in the list. You can do this by clicking any one of them, which highlights them all.
  2. Right-click and select Adjust List Indents from the shortcut menu.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  3. When the small window appears, you can make changes to any or all of the following list indent settings:
    • Bullet position: Enter a number or use the side arrows to determine how far the bullet point or list number will be positioned away from the left margin (in inches).
    • Text indent: Enter a number or use the side arrows to select the distance (in inches) away from the bullet or number that the text should appear.
    • Follow number with: This is what appears between the bullet or number and the text. By default, it’s a tab character, but you can pick Space or Nothing.
    • Add tab stop: If you want to add a tab stop, check the box and enter the measurement (in inches).
      How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  4. After making your changes, click OK.

You should see your list update immediately with your adjustments.

How to Change the Indent for a Single List Item

If you only want to change the indent for one list item instead of the entire list, you have a few different ways to go about it.

To change a single list item indent in Word:

  1. Place your cursor next to the text for the list item.
  2. Go to the Home tab and click the arrow next to Multilevel List.
  3. Move to Change List Level and choose the level you want to use. Each group provides a different bullet or number.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  4. Alternatively, right-click and select Multilevel List in the floating toolbar.
  5. Move to Change List Level and choose the level you want to use. Again, you’ll see a different bullet or number for each level.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  6. Press your Tab key for the number of times you want to indent the list item. You move the item one list level with each key press and see a different bullet or number.

Changing List Indents in Word

By changing list indents in your Word document, you’re giving yourself additional ways to format your text. You may want to move your list further in from the left margin, add more space between the bullets and the text, or use a different level for one list item. You can make all of these changes quickly in your Word document using the steps outlined above.

For more, take a look at how to sort lists alphabetically or how to create a checklist in Word. Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook to keep up with future tutorials like this!

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The Navigation Pane in Word: Overview

How to Show the Navigation Pane in Word

The Navigation pane in Word lets you quickly search or navigate through your document. To show the Navigation pane in Word, click the “View” tab in the Ribbon. For all document views other than “Read Mode,” then check the “Navigation Pane” checkbox in the “Show” button group. If using “Read Mode,” then select the “Navigation Pane” choice from the “View” tab’s drop-down menu, instead. By default, the Navigation pane appears at the left side of the application window.

How to Move, Resize, and Close the Navigation Pane in Word

To move, resize or close the Navigation pane in Word, click the small downward facing arrow in the upper-right corner of the pane. A drop-down menu of choices then appears. To move the Navigation Pane in Word, choose “Move” from the drop-down menu or hold your mouse over the title area of the pane until it turns into a four-pointed arrow. Then simply click and drag the pane with your mouse to move it. If you release the mouse button when it is over the document area, it then appears floating over the document area. You can leave the pane floating or you can dock it to either the right or left side of the application window by dragging it to the right or left sides of the application window until it docks itself to that side of the window.

To resize the Navigation Pane in Word, choose the “Size” command from the drop-down menu or hover your mouse pointer over the separator between the pane and the main work area of the application window until the mouse pointer then turns into a horizontal, two-pointed arrow. Then adjust the width of the pane by clicking and dragging with your mouse.

To close the Navigation Pane in Word, choose the “Close” command from the drop-down menu or click the “X” in the upper-right corner to close the Navigation pane.

How to Find Text Using the Navigation Pane in Word

To search for text in your document using the Navigation Pane in Word, type a search term or phrase into the search bar in the Navigation Pane. As you type the term, Word then automatically searches your document for matching text entries. Matching results appear highlighted in your document. You can also click the “Results” section below the search bar in the Navigation pane to list the matching results in the Navigation Pane. If there are too many matching results, they may not all appear in the “Results” section of the Navigation pane. However, a “# results” line always appears under the search bar with upward and downward facing arrow buttons to its right that you can click to individually navigate through the matching results. To stop searching and stay at a selected result, click the “X” button at the right end of the search bar.

How to Navigate through a Document Using the Navigation Pane in Word

Also, to navigate through your document by using any headings or pages in your document, click either the “Headings” or “Pages” sections under the search bar in the Navigation Pane in Word. You can then click on a heading or a page to navigate to that heading or page in your document.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The Navigation Pane in Word – Instructions: A picture of the “Headings” section within the Navigation Pane in Word.

The Navigation Pane in Word: Instructions

Instructions on How to Show the Navigation Pane in Word

  1. To enable the display of the Navigation pane, click the “View” tab in the Ribbon.
  2. For all document views other than “Read Mode,” then check the “Navigation Pane” checkbox in the “Show” button group.
  3. Alternatively, if using “Read Mode,” then select the “Navigation Pane” choice from the “View” tab’s drop-down menu, instead.
  4. By default, the Navigation pane appears at the left side of the application window.

Instructions on How to Move, Resize, and Close the Navigation Pane in Word

  1. To move, resize or close the Navigation pane in Word, click the small downward facing arrow in the upper-right corner of the pane to reveal a drop-down menu of choices.
  2. To move the Navigation Pane in Word, choose “Move” from the drop-down menu or hold your mouse over the title area of the pane until it turns into a four-pointed arrow.
  3. Then simply click and drag the pane with your mouse to move it.
  4. If you release the mouse button when it is over the document area, it then appears floating over the document area.
  5. You can leave the pane floating or you can dock it to either the right or left side of the application window by dragging it to the right or left sides of the application window until it docks itself to that side of the window.
  6. To resize the Navigation Pane in Word, choose the “Size” command from the drop-down menu or hover your mouse pointer over the separator between the pane and the main work area of the application window until the mouse pointer then turns into a horizontal, two-pointed arrow.
  7. Then adjust the width of the pane by clicking and dragging with your mouse.
  8. To close the Navigation Pane in Word, choose the “Close” command from the drop-down menu or click the “X” in the upper-right corner to close the Navigation pane.

Instructions on How to Find Text Using the Navigation Pane in Word

  1. To search for text in your document using the Navigation Pane in Word, type a search term or phrase into the search bar in the Navigation Pane.
  2. As you type the term, Word then automatically searches your document for matching text entries.
  3. Matching results appear highlighted in your document.
  4. To list the matching results in the Navigation Pane in Word, click the “Results” section below the search bar in the Navigation pane.
  5. If there are too many matching results, they may not all appear in the “Results” section of the Navigation pane.
  6. However, a “# results” line always appears under the search bar with upward and downward facing arrow buttons to its right that you can click to individually navigate through the matching results.
  7. To stop searching and stay at a selected result, click the “X” button at the right end of the search bar.

Instructions on How to Navigate through a Document Using the Navigation Pane in Word

  1. To navigate through your document by using any headings or pages in your document, click either the “Headings” or “Pages” sections under the search bar in the Navigation Pane in Word.
  2. You can then click on a heading or a page to navigate to that heading or page in your document.

The Navigation Pane in Word: Video Lesson

The following video lesson, titled “ Using the Navigation Pane ,” shows how to use the Navigation Pane in Word. This video lesson is from our complete Word tutorial , titled “ Mastering Word Made Easy v.2019 and 365 .”

By Richard Sutherland Contributions from Miles Bulloch published 11 February 22

There are a few ways to insert a tick or cross in Microsoft Word and Excel. We’ll show you how

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Microsoft Word and Excel are two important applications in the Microsoft Office suite. And with more online functionality than ever, the latest versions of the software are considered some of the best online collaboration tools a business can use today.

One issue that Microsoft Office users often run into is how to insert a tick or a cross into a Word or Excel document.

These symbols are nowhere to be found on a keyboard, so you need to discover another way to make them. Thankfully, it’s a simple process, and there are a few ways you can do this. We cover the five best ways to insert a tick or a cross into a Word or Excel document below.

How to insert a tick or a cross symbol in Microsoft Word and Excel: Preparation

Clearly you’ll need a copy of Microsoft Office to perform these tasks, and we recommend Microsoft 365 over all the other alternatives to Microsoft Office. Over the past few years, features like AutoSave, editing using a mobile device, and threaded commenting in Excel have made team collaboration easier in Microsoft’s office productivity software.

If you have a standalone version of Microsoft Office, the examples below will also work on Office 2004 and above. However, the arrangement of the interface menus differs significantly between versions.

Option 1: Copy and paste from the below symbols

To copy and paste a tick or cross, highlight one of the ticks or crosses below, then copy and paste it to your destination. Highlight (or double-click on) your preferred symbol below:

To Copy – once the symbol is highlighted press Ctrl + C (or right-click and select Copy from the menu)

Then place the cursor in the desired document (or select a cell)

To Paste – select where you want the symbol and press Ctrl + V (or right-click and select Paste from the menu)

Option 2: Insert a tick or a cross using the Symbol menu

The first way to add a tick or a cross to a Word or Excel document is through the Symbol menu. You’ll find it under the Insert menu, which is on the ribbon at the top of the screen.

Click on Symbol and choose More Symbols. Change the font to Wingdings in the Font select box. Scroll to the bottom, and you’ll find two different styles of ticks and crosses. Choose the symbol you prefer and click Insert.

Option 3: Insert a tick or a cross using the character code

As a slight shortcut, you can insert a tick or a cross by first changing the font to Wingdings, then entering the character codes directly. This only works if your computer’s keyboard has a separate numpad.

After setting the font to Wingdings, hold down the Alt button, type the relevant four-digit character code on the computer’s numpad, and then release the Alt button. The character will be inserted into your document.

The codes for a tick and a cross are 0252 and 0251, respectively. There are two alternatives, 0254 and 0253, respectively, that have boxes around them.

Option 4: Insert a tick or a cross with a built-in keyboard shortcut

Another alternative is to use built-in keyboard shortcuts in conjunction with another font called Wingdings 2.

Set the font to Wingdings 2 in your document where you want the tick or cross to be added. Press Shift+P for a tick or Shift+O for a cross. If you prefer them to be in boxes, press Shift+R or Shift+Q.

Option 5: Set your own keyboard shortcuts for the tick or cross

Finally, you can set up your own keyboard shortcut that will speed up the process of inserting ticks and crosses in the future. You can do this by finding the relevant symbol in the Symbol menu and choosing a shortcut key.

First, open the Insert menu, select the Symbol dropdown, and click on More Symbols. Switch the font to either Wingdings or Wingdings 2 and find the symbol you prefer.

Press Shortcut Key and enter your own combination of keys (e.g., Ctrl+Shift+T). Click Assign. Now, whenever you press that combination of keys, the symbol will be inserted into your document without you having to change the font, visit the Symbol menu, or enter a character code.

Summary

We’ve outlined five ways to insert ticks and crosses into your Microsoft Word and Excel documents. You can use the Symbol menu, enter the character code, or use a keyboard shortcut.

For more information on how to get the best out of Microsoft Word and Excel, we’ve put together a few guides. We discuss how to use the Microsoft Office Ribbon and how to start page numbering from a specific page in Microsoft Word. You may also find it useful to learn how to insert and edit footnotes in Microsoft Word.

The Microsoft Office suite is in our list of the best tools and apps for remote workers, though we’ve found that many companies still aren’t making the most of Microsoft 365 because employees aren’t always aware of all the features that are available to them.

If you’d prefer to investigate another option altogether, we’ve highlighted the differences between Microsoft 365 and Google Workspace.

I have been always fascinated with info-graphics and story-based visuals. These kinds of things help me to tell a story with data. A pictograph is a great example of this. But apart from this, there is a chart in Excel about which most of us are not aware.

That’s called: People Graph

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

It was first introduced with Microsoft Excel 2013 to help people to create infographics. In a people graph, instead of a column, bar, or line, we have icons to present the data. And, it looks nice and professional.

Today, in this post, I’d like to share simple steps to insert a people graph in Excel and the option which we can use with it. So let’s get started.

7 Steps to Insert a People Graph in Excel

Creating a people graph in Excel is simple and easy, we just need few clicks. Here is the data table which I’m using here, you can download it from here to follow along.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

  1. First of all, go to Insert Tab -> Add-Ins -> click on the small green button.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  2. It will insert a people graph with dummy data.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  3. Now, your next step is to connect data with the chart.
  4. Click on data icon and then click on select your data button.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  5. Now, select the data table and click on create button.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007
  6. The last thing is to all a title for your chart.
  7. Again click on the data icon and change the default title to the desired title.
    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Congratulations! Your first info-graphic is ready to tell its story. It’s a proud moment.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Customization and Other Options

As I said it’s easy to insert a people graph. But, there are some customization options that can do after that.

1. Chart Type

There are 3 pre-defined charts types that we can use. Click on the setting button and select the type which you want.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

2. Theme

We can also use different themes for our chart. There are 7 pre-defined themes that we can use. Click on the setting button and select the type which you want.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

3. Shape (Icon)

We can’t use a single shape for all types of data. So that’s why there are 12 different shapes from which we can select. Click on the setting button and select the shape which you want.

4. Save as Image

There is an option to save it as an image. With this, we can use it further in PowerPoint, send it in an email, upload it to the web, etc.

5. More

  • When you update any value in the source data, make sure to click on the graph once to update it.
  • You can also paste it as an image in the worksheet by copy paste.

Conclusion

Infographics are superb in presenting data in a vivid way. And I believe that creating a people graph in Excel is really fun.

You can also use it in your dashboards and templates to give them an awesome look and for an effective way to make others understand data. I’m sure you found this graph useful and it will help you in your work.

Now tell me one thing.

Have you ever tried this before? And do you think we can use it in our dashboards?

Please share your views in the comment section, I would love to hear from you. And, don’t forget to share this charting tip with your friends.

If you want to allow other users to change the certain parts of a document, you can lock parts of the Word document, and the unlocked parts of the document can be edited freely.

Recommended Productivity Tools for Word

Lock specified sections of document in Word

The first method will guide you to add section breaks in current document, and then lock specified sections easily. And you can do it as following:

Step 1: Put the cursor before the part of document you will protect, and then click the Breaks > Continuous on the Page Layout tab. Then add a continuous break at the end of the part of document with same way.

Step 2: Show the Restrict Editing pane with clicking the Restrict Editing button on the Review tab.

Note: In Word 2007, you need to click the Protect Document > Restrict Formatting and Editing on the Review tab.

Step 3: In the Restrict Editing pane, go to the Editing restrictions section, and:

(1) Check the option of Allow only this type of editing in the document;

(2) Click the following box, and then specify the Filling in forms from the drop down list;

(3) Click the text of Select Sections.

(4) In the popping up Section Protection dialog box, only check the sections you will protect, and then click the OK button.

Step 4: Go ahead to click the Yes, Start Enforcing Protection button in the Restrict Editing pane.

Step 5: In the throwing Start Enforcing Protection dialog box,

(1) Check the Password;

(2) Enter your password in the both Enter new password (optional) box and Reenter password to confirm box;

(3) Click the OK button.

Step 6: Save your Word document.

Up to now, the specified sections have been protected by your specified password already.

Lock part of documents in Word

This method will guide you to lock a specified part of a document with adding a content control in Microsoft Word easily.

Step 1: Select the part of document you will protect, and then click the Rich Text Content Control button on the Developer tab.

Note: Click to know how to add the Developer tab into the Ribbon: Show developer tab/ribbon in Word

Step 2: Go ahead to click the Properties button on the Developer tab.

Step 3: In the coming Content Control Properties dialog box,

(1) Enter a name for this content control in the Title box;

(2) Check the option of Content control cannot be deleted;

(3) Check the option of Contents cannot be edited;

(4) Click the OK button.

Step 4: Enable the Restrict Editing pane (or Restrict Formatting and Edit pane) with clicking the Restrict Editing button on the Developer tab.

Notes:

(1) In Word 2007, please click the Protect Document > Restrict Formatting and Editing on the Developer tab.

(2) You can also find out the Restrict Editing button (or Protect Document button) on the Review tab.

Step 5: Go to the Restrict Editing pane,

(1) Check the option of Limit formatting to a selection of styles;

(2) Uncheck the option of Allow only this type of editing in the document;

(3) Click the Yes, Start Enforcing Protection button.

Step 6: In the coming Start Enforcing Protection dialog box,

(1) Check the Password;

(2) Enter your password in the both Enter new password (optional) box and Reenter password to confirm box;

(3) Click the OK button.

Step 7: Save current document.

Using tabs in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, Access, Project and Visio;

Easy to switch back and forth between files in Microsoft Office 2003/2007/2010/2013/2016/2019;

Compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 / 8 / 10, Windows Server 2003 and 2008, Citrix System and Windows Terminal (Remote Desktop) Server;

Free trial without feature limitation in 30 days!

Matthew Guay is a veteran app reviewer and technology tip writer. His work has appeared on Zapier’s blog, AppStorm, Envato Tuts+, and his own blog, Techinch. Read more.

Microsoft Word is a great tool for formatting text, but what if you want to insert a chemistry formula or diagram? Thanks to a new free add-in for Word, you can now insert high-quality chemistry formulas and diagrams directly from the Ribbon in Word.

Microsoft’s new Education Labs has recently released the new Chemistry Add-in for Word 2007 and 2010. This free download adds support for entering and editing chemistry symbols, diagrams, and formulas using the standard XML based Chemical Markup Language.

You can convert any chemical name, such as benzene, or formula, such as H2O, into a chemical diagram, standard name, or formula. Whether you’re a professional chemist, just taking chemistry in school, or simply curious about the makeup of Citric Acid, this add-in is an exciting way to bring chemistry to your computer.

This add-in works great on Word 2007 and 2010, including the 64 bit version of Word 2010. Please note that the current version is still in beta, so only run it if you are comfortable running beta products.

Getting Started

Download the Chemistry add-in from Microsoft Education Labs (link below), and unzip the file. Then, run the ChemistryAddinforWordBeta2.Setup.msi.

It may inform you that you need to install the Visual Studio Tools for Office 3.0. Simply click Yes to download these tools.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

This will open the download in your default browser. Simply click run, or save and then run it when it is downloaded.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Now, click next to install the Visual Studio Tools for Office as usual.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

When this is finished, run the ChemistryAddinforWordBeta2.Setup.msi again. This time, you can easily install it with the default options.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Once it’s finished installing, open Word to try out the Chemistry Add-in. You will be asked if you want to install this customization, so click Install to enable it.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Now you will have a new Chemistry tab in your Word ribbon. Here’s the ribbon in Word 2010…

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

And here it is in Word 2007.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Using the Chemistry Add-in

It’s very easy to insert nice chemistry diagrams and formulas in Word with the Chemistry add-in. You can quickly insert a premade diagram from the Chemistry Gallery:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Or you can insert a formula from file. Simply click “From File” and choose any Chemical Markup Language (.cml) formatted file to insert the chemical formula.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

You can also convert any chemical name to it’s chemical form. Simply select the word, right-click, select “Convert to Chemistry Zone” and then click on its name.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Now you can see the chemical form in the sidebar if you click the Chemistry Navigator button, and can choose to insert the diagram into the document. Some chemicals will automatically convert to the diagram in the document, while others simply link to it in the sidebar. Either way, you can display exactly what you want.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

You can also convert a chemical formula directly to it’s chemical diagram. Here we entered H2O and converted it to Chemistry Zone:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

This directly converted it to the diagram directly in the document.

You can click the Edit button on the top, and from there choose to either edit the 2D model of the chemical, or edit the labels.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

When you click Edit Labels, you may be asked which form you wish to display. Here’s the options for potassium permanganate:

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

You can then edit the names and formulas, and add or remove any you wish.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

If you choose to edit the chemical in 2D, you can even edit the individual atoms and change the chemical you’re diagramming. This 2D editor has a lot of options, so you can get your chemical diagram to look just like you want.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

And, if you need any help or want to learn more about the Chemistry add-in and its features, simply click the help button in the Chemistry Ribbon. This will open a Word document containing examples and explanations which can be helpful in mastering all the features of this add-in.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

All of this works perfectly, whether you’re running it in Word 2007 or 2010, 32 or 64 bit editions.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Conclusion

Whether you’re using chemistry formulas everyday or simply want to investigate a chemical makeup occasionally, this is a great way to do it with tools you already have on your computer. It will also help make homework a bit easier if you’re struggling with it in high school or college.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

  • May 08, 2012
  • Category : Tech Tips

Having trouble with your Microsoft Word? Do not know how you can stretch a photo to fit in exactly in full page of the word file? Trying to change the margin of the page, yet it is not helpful? Trying to pull the photo to the edges but ended up shrinking or pushing the image to aside.

Here, let us try to fix it together.

As usual, if you want to insert a photo, you will go to “insert” and select a photo. But somehow the border of the margin makes it almost impossible to fit a photo in full page. There is a maximum limit for you to adjust.

Having trouble with your Microsoft Word? Do not know how you can stretch a photo to fit in exactly in full page of the word file? Trying to change the margin of the page, yet it is not helpful? Trying to pull the photo to the edges but ended up shrinking or pushing the image to aside.

Here, let us try to fix it together.

As usual, if you want to insert a photo, you will go to “insert” and select a photo. But somehow the border of the margin makes it almost impossible to fit a photo in full page. There is a maximum limit for you to adjust.

So, here’s the trick. You can go to insert, select text box to draw a text box manually. Draw it from the edge to edge to cover the entire page. Select to insert a picture on the text box.

The picture will be able to fit in the page, for 99% of the page, if you did draw a perfect text box covering the entire page.

*New update!*

You should really try this, easiest and fastest.

1) Select to insert a picture.

2) Click on the picture. There should be a box around your picture. Go to “format” under the picture tools.

3) Select “Text wrapping

4) Choose “behind text” and start dragging your picture to fit in the entire page. This works perfectly, covering 100% of the page.

*Reminder: you may want to insert a page break for that page so that the content from the next page will not move into the first page after you select “behind the text” for your picture.

It’s time to join the modern world

If you want to use the modern features of Word 2019 or Office 365, you will need to upgrade your Word documents if they are based on an older version of the Word software. Upgrading ensures that your documents are compatible with the newer versions of Word and that you are able to use the new formatting and other tools available in the latest versions of the software.

Converting an old Word document to a newer version only takes a few clicks as long as the Word software is installed on your computer. When the file is converted, you’ll see it has a new extension that only newer Word files use.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Upgrade Word Documents Using The Word Software

If you have the Microsoft Office suite installed on your computer, you likely have Word installed as well. You can use this software without requiring any add-ons to upgrade your Word documents.

Right-click on the document you want to convert and select Open with followed by Word. This ensures the file opens in the right software.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

When the document opens, click on the File tab at the top-left corner. Then select the tab that says Info in the left sidebar and click on Convert in the right pane.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

A dialog box will appear on your screen asking you to confirm your action. Here’s what it basically wants to tell you:

  • Your old document will be replaced with the new upgraded one.
  • There’ll be minor changes to the layout.
  • Click on Tell Me More if you’d like to know more about the process. Also, if you don’t want to see this dialog box for future conversions, checkmark the checkbox.
  • Finally, hit the OK button to start the conversion.

Another way to upgrade your document is to use the Word’s save menu. While the document is open, click on the File tab and select Save As.

Then select Word Document from the format drop-down menu and hit Save. Keep in mind that this doesn’t replace the old version of the document but creates a completely new copy of the document based on the newer Word software.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

You can follow the above steps to upgrade as many of your old Word documents to newer versions as you want.

Also, since it’s just a matter of a few clicks and you have the ability to disable the dialog box, you can easily convert a number of documents in a short period of time.

Upgrade Word Documents to Microsoft Word Online

If you don’t have the Word software installed on your computer and you prefer to use the online Word app, you can also use it to convert your Word documents.

The online app provides pretty much the same features and interface as the offline one.

Open a modern web browser and head over to the Office online website. Once you’re there, sign-in to your account if you aren’t already.

When the main interface loads-up, click on the option that says Start new and select Upload and open. It’ll let you upload your old Word file from your computer.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Navigate to the folder where your document is and select it for it to be uploaded online.

When the file is uploaded and is open on your screen, click on the Edit Document option and then select Edit in Browser.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

A prompt will appear saying it’ll first convert your file and then let you edit it. It also says a copy of your original document will be created.

Click on Convert in the prompt.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

If you’d like to see the changes in the layout, click on View. Else, click on Edit to start editing the document.

To get a copy of the document for offline access, click on the File menu and select Save As followed by Download a Copy.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Click on Download on the following screen to start downloading the document to your computer.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The downloaded document should be the upgraded version of your old Word document.

Now that your documents are upgraded, you are free to use any of the modern functionalities of Word in them. You can use newer editing tools, use a newer file extension, and so on, without any worries.

Bear in mind, though, if you need to send the file back to someone and they use an older version of the software, they won’t be able to see the newer changes made to the document.

What Is Compatibility Mode In Microsoft Word?

When you open an old version of a document in the latest Word software, you’ll find a text saying Compatibility Mode appearing next to the document name at the top. Did you ever wonder what that text meant?

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Compatibility Mode is actually a mode that the newer versions of Word use to ensure that when you edit your old documents, they aren’t being modified with the latest editing tools in the software.

It’s because Word doesn’t want you to add any features to your old documents that the old versions of Word don’t understand. For example, if you add a new formatting option available in Word 2016 to your Word 2004 document, the 2004 version of Word won’t understand the formatting. It may then show the document with scrambled text and so on.

Compatibility Mode ensures things like that don’t happen and that you can only use the formatting and other tools that are fully compatible with your current Word document version.

Mahesh has been obsessed with technology since he got his first gadget a decade or so ago. Over the last few years, he’s written a number of tech articles on various online publications including but not limited to MakeTechEasier and Android AppStorm. Read Mahesh’s Full Bio

I have a problem with one of my clients, when they open a word doc that was created by someone else many of the words are merged together and sentances loose there spaces. I have tried the same doc on on other computers and its fine, logged into to another profile on the same machine with the problem and the doc opens normally. I have tried reinstalling office and applying updates, niether had fixed the problem. I am guessing it may be a setting in word, since it only does it in this particular user’s profile. Any help would be appreciated.

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Sounds to me like line spacing defaults. They changed it from 1.0 to 1.15 from 2003 to 2007 for instance. See this link for more info and where to change it.

If you can log onto another profile on the same machine, then you may want to check fonts that the other user has loaded that the 1st user (when doc screws up) may not have. Also word formats the pages based on the default printer and the driver it uses. Check the default printer of the user on machine that it works compared to the one that doesn’t. May just be that they have different default printers, and the page is getting formatted differently when it opens.

Does this user have default formats setup in there Normal.dot preferences also?

Thanks for info Kris7191, but I did check the line spacing and it is not releated to it. The problem is that the document looses the spacing between words and the beginning and end of sentances. Here is part of your sentance as an example: Sounds tome like linespacing defaults.See this link for moreinfo and where to changeit.

To Mike6051: Yes they do have the defaults in the normal.dot file, I even deleted it and reopened word to recreate it and it still happens. Both users have the same printer with the same driver version, but I could try to delete the printer then reinstall it and see what happens. It is worth a shot. Thanks.

Richard, were you able to get this issue resolved?

I was able to fix it by uninstalling Office 2007 pro and reinstalling it. So I never found out exactly what the cause of the issue was, but Word is now working properly, I just wish I was able to figure out exactly what caused it

Sounds like a Windows update bug to me.

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    How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

The SOC Briefing for May 13th – We are back!

Good morning and welcome to today’s briefing. I am starting this back, usually will try to post mostly Fridays on this as much as I can. As usually this post bring various posts regarding Patches & Updates plus Security News and a bonus Security Tip! Hope.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Snap! Cybersecurity & the boardroom, Cooper, Starlink sat internet, & Sgr A*

Your daily dose of tech news, in brief. Not only is it Friday, but it is also Friday the 13th! A day that has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise, and triskaidekaphobia, a word I had to.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

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How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

IE11 retires in 1 month on June 15, 2022

Received this reminder email from MS this morning. I won’t be sad to finally see this go, even though I know I have a few hold outs who insist on clicking on that E still (mostly out of habit)Is everyone Ready for the big day?—————————–.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Spark! Pro Series – May 13th, 2022

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I’ve the same problem. This is how I work around it. Select the footer of section to be deleted. Link to previous. Unlink to previous. Delete section break.

Is it just me or this completely counter intuitive? It should be the other way around, delete a section break and it keeps the formatting from the section prior.

God damn you microsoft

As has been discussed, deleting a Section break causes the Section preceding the break to assume the page layout of the following Section. The following macro works the other way, across multiple (selected) Section breaks. All common page layout issues (margins, page orientation, text columns, headers & footers) are addressed.

Sub MergeSections()
Application.ScreenUpdating = False
Dim sPageHght As Single, sPageWdth As Single
Dim sHeaderDist As Single, sFooterDist As Single
Dim sTMargin As Single, sBMargin As Single
Dim sLMargin As Single, sRMargin As Single
Dim sGutter As Single, sGutterPos As Single
Dim lPaperSize As Long, lGutterStyle As Long
Dim lMirrorMargins As Long, lVerticalAlignment As Long
Dim lScnStart As Long, lScnDir As Long
Dim lOddEvenHdFt As Long, lDiffFirstHdFt As Long
Dim bTwoPagesOnOne As Boolean, bBkFldPrnt As Boolean
Dim bBkFldPrnShts As Boolean, bBkFldRevPrnt As Boolean
Dim bOrientation As Boolean, oHdFt As HeaderFooter
Dim Sctn1 As Section, Sctn2 As Section
With Selection
If .Sections.Count = 1 Then
MsgBox “Selection does not span a Section break”, vbExclamation
Exit Sub
End If
Set Sctn1 = .Sections.First: Set Sctn2 = .Sections.Last
With Sctn1.PageSetup
lPaperSize = .PaperSize
lGutterStyle = .GutterStyle
bOrientation = .Orientation
lMirrorMargins = .MirrorMargins
lScnStart = .SectionStart
lScnDir = .SectionDirection
lOddEvenHdFt = .OddAndEvenPagesHeaderFooter
lDiffFirstHdFt = .DifferentFirstPageHeaderFooter
lVerticalAlignment = .VerticalAlignment
sPageHght = .PageHeight
sPageWdth = .PageWidth
sTMargin = .TopMargin
sBMargin = .BottomMargin
sLMargin = .LeftMargin
sRMargin = .RightMargin
sGutter = .Gutter
sGutterPos = .GutterPos
sHeaderDist = .HeaderDistance
sFooterDist = .FooterDistance
bTwoPagesOnOne = .TwoPagesOnOne
bBkFldPrnt = .BookFoldPrinting
bBkFldPrnShts = .BookFoldPrintingSheets
bBkFldRevPrnt = .BookFoldRevPrinting
End With
With Sctn2.PageSetup
.GutterStyle = lGutterStyle
.MirrorMargins = lMirrorMargins
.SectionStart = lScnStart
.SectionDirection = lScnDir
.OddAndEvenPagesHeaderFooter = lOddEvenHdFt
.DifferentFirstPageHeaderFooter = lDiffFirstHdFt
.VerticalAlignment = lVerticalAlignment
.PageHeight = sPageHght
.PageWidth = sPageWdth
.TopMargin = sTMargin
.BottomMargin = sBMargin
.LeftMargin = sLMargin
.RightMargin = sRMargin
.Gutter = sGutter
.GutterPos = sGutterPos
.HeaderDistance = sHeaderDist
.FooterDistance = sFooterDist
.TwoPagesOnOne = bTwoPagesOnOne
.BookFoldPrinting = bBkFldPrnt
.BookFoldPrintingSheets = bBkFldPrnShts
.BookFoldRevPrinting = bBkFldRevPrnt
.PaperSize = lPaperSize
.Orientation = bOrientation
End With
With Sctn2
For Each oHdFt In .Footers
oHdFt.LinkToPrevious = Sctn1.Footers(oHdFt.Index).LinkToPrevious
If oHdFt.LinkToPrevious = False Then
With oHdFt.Range
.FormattedText = Sctn1.Footers(oHdFt.Index).Range.FormattedText
Do While .Characters.Last.Previous = vbCr
.Characters.Last.Previous.Delete
If .Characters.Count = 1 Then Exit Do
Loop
End With
End If
Next
For Each oHdFt In .Headers
oHdFt.LinkToPrevious = Sctn1.Headers(oHdFt.Index).LinkToPrevious
If oHdFt.LinkToPrevious = False Then
With oHdFt.Range
.FormattedText = Sctn1.Headers(oHdFt.Index).Range.FormattedText
Do While .Characters.Last.Previous = vbCr
.Characters.Last.Previous.Delete
If .Characters.Count = 1 Then Exit Do
Loop
End With
End If
Next
End With
While .Sections.Count > 1
.Sections.First.Range.Characters.Last.Delete
Wend
End With
Set Sctn1 = Nothing: Set Sctn2 = Nothing
Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

Cheers
Paul Edstein
[MS MVP – Word]

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

When creating a document in Microsoft Word, or a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel, users can add many types of shapes to highlight important items. Bringing attention to those items helps readers to better understand the content of the document or spreadsheet. After a shape is added, it can be modified by changing features, such as size, color, and fill.

To add and edit a shape in Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel, select a link below for help.

  • Add shapes in Microsoft Word.
  • Add shapes in Microsoft Excel.
  • Edit shapes in Microsoft Word and Excel.

Add shapes in Microsoft Word

  1. In Microsoft Word, click the Inserttab at the top of the program window.
  2. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Shapes option.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

  1. Select the type of shape you want to add or draw from the drop-down menu that appears.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Add shapes in Microsoft Excel

  1. In Microsoft Excel, click the Inserttab at the top of the program window.
  2. On the Insert tab, click the Illustrations option, then click the Shapes option.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

  1. Select the type of shape you want to add or draw from the drop-down menu that appears.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Edit shapes in Microsoft Word and Excel

  1. Click the shape to select it.
  2. Right-click the shape and select Format Shape in the pop-up menu.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

  1. The Format Shape section opens on the right side of the program window. You can change the shape’s fill, select the type and fill color (or no fill at all), and the size, color, and shape’s lines. You can also add shadow, glow, reflection, and other effects.

Improve your Word, Excel, Outlook or PowerPoint Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) beyond the small changes allowed by Microsoft directly. This works in all modern Office for Windows including Microsoft 365, Office 2016/2019/2021/LTSC.

You’ll be able to shorten the overly long text labels or change icons (because too many are the same) with a short list of images to get you started.

Easily turn QAT items on/off and do all of this for the entire program or just single documents or templates.

It’s all possible because the QAT configuration is saved in plain text files. All you need to know where to find them and what to change.

Global vs per document

Quick Access Toolbar details are saved in plain text files for the entire program. Other QAT changes can be saved in a document or template to appear when those files are opened.

To change document/template QAT manually means opening up the .docx .xlsx .pptx file to explore the contents. Quick Access Toolbar changes are saved in the document/template in the userCustomization/customUI.xml file within the document.

We’ll stick to the application QAT for this article.

Where are the Quick Access Toolbar details stored?

For the overall QAT changes go to C:\Users\ \AppData\Local\Microsoft\Office\ . Appdata is a hidden folder.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Look for the .officeUI files in Office 2016. There are separate files for Word, Excel, PowerPoint plus a series of olk. for Outlook.

We’re going to focus on Word.officeui in this article. The same principles apply to the other .officeui files.

IGNORE the .customUI files. They are not plain text and should not be touched.

Opening .officeUI

Word.officeUI is a plain text file so you can, in theory, open it in Notepad. However that’s quite hard to read.

Better to use an editor which has some modern formatting options. We’ve used Notepad++ for many years. Select XML formatting for colorization.

There’s a lot in the .officeUI file, we’re just interested in the Quick Access Toolbar part between the and tags.

Add items first

Get Office to do the heavy lifting for you. Before opening the .officeUI file go to Customize Quick Access Toolbar and add the items you want to the QAT.

This saves you the hassle of looking up the exact names of QAT items (the idQ elements in .officeUI).

For these examples we’ve added three items to the QAT. The Classic Style menu, Paragraph Keep with Next and Apply Normal Style.

How to create a stick figure on microsoft office word 2007

Which look like this on the latest Quick Access Toolbar but changes appearance depending on your version of Office.

You can edit the officeui file while the program is running but there’s a risk of corruption and losing all your customizations. Better to close Word/Excel or PowerPoint, edit the .officeui file then restart the program.

BACKUP

Before making any changes, make sure you have a backup copy of the .officeUI file. If there’s a mistake in your changes, Office can revert to its original settings and delete all customizations.

Visible or not

Let’s start with a simple example, making a QAT item visible or not. Open the .officeUI file and you’ll probably see some items listed which do NOT appear on your QAT.

This line adds the QuickPrint button to the QAT but it doesn’t appear because the visible property is set to false. To make it appear, simply change the text from false to true.

This lets you leave QAT settings in the officeui file but disable them if they’re not working or not required.

Change QAT text

A common problem with QAT items is the long text label. It takes up too much horizontal space on the QAT line. ‘Para Keep With Next’ is just one example of overly long default text, see above.

Here’s the original line that adds ‘Para Keep with Next’.

Override the long text with the label=”” attribute.

Restart Word and your changes will appear.

Backup:

Yes, again. Take a backup of your working changes once they are in place. Office will remove all customizations if it detects any problem with the .officeUI file. Ideally Office should just ignore an .officeUI line which it doesn’t understand but instead it just dumps all your changes. Keep a separate copy of your work, just in case.

Change QAT icons

We’ve already seen that the default Heading buttons are all the same on the Quick Access Toolbar.

But there’s no direct way to change them.

So it’s back to customizing the .officeUI file. Here’s the original XML file that adds a ‘Apply Normal Style’ button.

Add an imageMso=”” attribute with the name of an icon. We’ve used “ChangeToAcceptInvitation” because it’s a simple tick.

Note: imageMso names are case-sensitive.

Another note: the icons look different in each version of Office.

There’s no good list of all the imageMso names with images. The Microsoft list is useless because it’s just a list of names without images … go figure.

Spreadsheet1 has many, but not all, the images. Hover over an icon to see the imageMso name.

Some imageMSO you can try

Here’s a few imageMSO names to get you started.

Letters

All the letters A-Z have icons for example imageMso=”N”

Numbers

All ten digits also have icons, the name is the digit prefixed with an underscore eg imageMso=”_4″

Others

Yellow Star AnimationCustomEmphasisDialog

Green Star AnimationCustomEntranceDialog

Red Star AnimationCustomExitDialog

Tick (green) ChangeToAcceptInvitation – there are other similar icons.

Cross (red) ChangeToDeclineInvitation – there are other similar icons.

Automated numbered lists are a feature a lot of us take for granted in Microsoft Word…. They usually work seamlessly and automatically, but sometimes these lists can work against us: restarting a list of numbers at 1 when we mean to continue our list, or picking up formatting that we can’t seem to shake, like creating all bold numbers in spite of unbold text. Don’t despair; these little inconveniences are remarkably simple to fix.

To follow along, you may download the exercise file: NumberedLists

This file contains a fascinating list of silly words laid out in series of numbers lists. Let’s take a look at our options.

Look at the second section of words, starting with “Brouhaha.” It is clear that this list should not be starting over; it should be a continuation of the previous list. This is a simple fix.

  1. Right click on top of the number 1 next to the word Brouhaha.
  2. Select Continue Numbering

This will pick up the value from the previous numbered list. What if the opposite happens? Word guesses that you would like to continue numbering, but you actually intend to start over? Easy peasy! Follow the same process, but this time select Restart at 1.

Additionally, occasionally when you insert a numbered list, you will see a lightening bolt appear with a dropdown arrow. This is just another way to access the same feature, a shortcut inserted by Word that will allow you to make the decision whether to continue numbering or restart at 1.

There is also an option in this menu to Set Numbering Value. This option is for those times when you need a special number, perhaps one that is out of sequence with the rest of your numbered list.

Sometimes you create a lovely numbered list, and for whatever reason, Word picks up on formatting from a previous line of text, making all the numbers bold, or a previously used color.

On the exercise document, look at the third section. Someone used a blue bold font for the text above the numbered list, and Word assumed that this should apply to the numbers on the list. To fix this, let’s take a closer look at that right click menu.

  1. Right click on top of the first blue number, next to “Taradiddle”
  2. Attached to the numbering options in a separate section is the ability to change the formatting: to remove the bold formatting and recolor the text.
    • Note: sometimes these options appear above the numbering options, sometimes they are below.

Creating Sub Points

In the last section, numbers 4 and 5 should be sub points of number 3. To demote them to sub point click to the left of “Our Friends,” and hit tab on your keyboard. Do the same for “Our Neighbors.”

This has created sub points, and Word assumed that you would like to indicate sub points with lowercase alphabet:

If the alphabet isn’t your goal, you can always click into the text in the line of a or b, go the numbered list dropdown in the Paragraph group of the Home tab, and select a different format. Maybe Roman numerals?

Promoting Sub Points

By the way, how do you change your mind and promote a sub point back to being a main point? Well, you could use the Decrease Indent (left arrow) in the Paragraph group…

But you all know I am a fan of shortcuts, and my favorite one for this purpose is shift + tab.

Have numbered lists caused you trouble in the past? Will any of these tips help you going forward? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

4 thoughts on “Word: Solutions for Common Issues with Numbered Lists”

Ah, auto-formatting… ‘Tis both a blessing and a curse! It’s also sometimes helpful to mix numbered and bullet lists, when the sub-points aren’t prioritized or are just a few of all possible examples.

I personally prefer kerfuffle or ballyhoo over brouhaha, so perhaps I’ll practice numbered lists with my own top silly words!

I should have added “rococo” to the list, but it slipped my mind…

Thanks again, Ali. Sometimes it seems Office products do these things out of spite. I don’t know what I did to Microsoft, but it seems to hold a grudge.

LOL! Glad it was helpful, Corey! 🙂

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How to color pages in a Word document

How to color pages in a Word document

Learn three easy ways to add a bit of color to the pages of your Microsoft Word document.

Image: iStock/Laures

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Adding a bit of color is an easy way to liven up or otherwise add a professional touch to a Microsoft Word document. You might decide to add a sedate color to a promotional letter or resume. Or you might want to add a meaningful color, such as a team color to a booster letter. Whatever your reasons, it’s easy to add color to all of the pages in your document. It takes a bit more work to colorize individual pages. In this article, I’ll show you how to do both, and a bit more.

I’m using Microsoft 365 on a Windows 10 64-bit system, but you can use earlier versions. There’s no downloadable demonstration file; you won’t need one. The browser edition is unreliable displaying colors.

How to add one color to all pages in Word

If you run out of color print paper, you can quickly add color to every page in your Word document and then print the document. For most if it, the ink will cost more than colored paper, so I don’t recommend doing this all the time. If the document’s going to the web or via email, there’s no cost to you at all!

To color the pages of a document, click the Design tab and then click Page Color in the Page Background group. Choose a color from the dropdown palette or choose More Colors or even Fill Effects. Later, you can explore both of the latter options, but for now, let’s stick with colors in the existing palette. If you want a border, click the Page Borders option. We won’t discuss every option, but Figure A shows a two-page document with a light blue background and a dark green border.

Figure A

Using the Page Color and Page Borders options, it took less than a minute. That was easy, but you won’t always want to add color to every page.

How to add one color for a single page in Word

For better or worse, Word offers no option for adding a background color to a single page or multiple pages. It’s an all-or-nothing setting. If you want to color a single or multiple pages, but not the entire document, you can insert a rectangle shape sized to fit the page and set a few properties. Now, let’s use this method on the second page of a three-page document:

  1. Click the Insert tab, click Shapes in the Illustrations group, click the Rectangle shape and size it to the paper (Figure B).
  2. From the Shape Fill dropdown in the Shape Styles group, choose a color from the palette.
  3. With the rectangle selected, click the Send Backward option in the Arrange group, and choose Send Behind Text (Figure C).

Figure B

Figure C

Using this method, you could add more than one color to the background by using multiple rectangles, or even other shapes, but I recommend you keep it simple. To add a border, add a second rectangle, size it appropriately, and then remove the fill color and add a border color.

Once you have the rectangle and properties set (Figure D) you can quickly copy it to other pages. With the rectangle selected, press Ctrl+D to make a copy. Drag that copy and position it on another page. With this method, you can change the color for different pages.

Figure D

Make sure your colored page prints

If the background color doesn’t print, there’s an easy fix. Click the File tab and choose Display in the left pane. In the Printing options section, make sure the Print background colors and images option is checked, as shown in Figure E. The problem is that few printers can fulfill the promise. Most will leave a small uncolored border around the edges of the sheet of paper. There’s nothing you can do about this.

Figure E

How to color only one section of a page in Word

If you don’t want to color the entire page, you might want to consider adding color as a paragraph format. The good news is that it’s easy to apply or remove—you don’t even need a text box!

First, select the paragraph(s) you want to color. Then, in the Paragraph group, click the Shading dropdown and choose a color from the palette. As you can see in Figure F, I’ve used a light blue to shade a few paragraphs. You could use this method to color the entire portion of the page that’s inside the borders, leaving the borders white. The color is a paragraph property, so if you move the paragraph, the color goes with it.

Figure F

Stay tuned

Adding filled rectangles could be tedious work. But you’re in luck if you’re willing to add sections to the document. In a subsequent article, I’ll show you how to color the background of all the pages in a section with one rectangle.

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