How to create a book of your original poetry

Desktop publishing is a powerful tool. You can use a word processor and a printer to make your own little chapbook or pocket-sized book at home.

What is a Chapbook?

A chapbook is a small book or booklet that is often used for poetry or short stories. Chapbooks were the first types of books published in early Europe. The image below shows an example from a 1810 chapbook edition of Little Red Riding Hood . The British Library has more information about early chapbooks here. Another good resource on chapbook history can be found here on the Antique Book Collecting blog, which says the early chapbooks “were extremely important for the dissemination of popular literature among the lower classes, for whom traditional books were prohibitively expensive.”

The Wikipedia entry for chapbooks notes that early chapbooks were published on a single sheet and then “folded into books of 8, 12, 16 or 24 pages.” They are still published in this size today by small publishers. The Poetry Society of America maintains a list of chapbook publishers here. You can also publish them yourself.

An article in The Guardian says it is time to rediscover the glory of chapbooks. Lee Rourke writes, “The booklets have been spreading the literary word for more than 450 years and they still have the power to delight and inform in equal measure.”

How Big Are Chapbooks?

Chapbooks vary in size. There are no fixed size requirements but they are usually smaller than standard paper size, which is 8.5 by 11 inches. If you fold a standard sheet of paper in half it will measure 3.667 x 8.5 inches. The folding guidelines page from TechnaPrint describes a bunch of different folds and the resulting sizes.

How to Make a Chapbook

The advantage of doing it yourself with DIY chapbook publishing is you have total control over your little chapbook. You bypass the self-publishing services route. You can print as many as you want and give them away or sell them for whatever price you want. You can make your own chapbook at home using desktop publishing software (including Microsoft Word), a printer, heavy card stock paper (for the cover) and a few other tools. You can also do the layout for your chapbook at home and then take it to the printers.

Here are some good resources for creating your DIY chapbook.


    How to Make a Pocket-Size Book in Word – Poets & Writers has an article with a slideshow that shows you how to make a small book at home using Microsoft Word and your printer. The step-by-step guide walks you through the page numbering, printing, folding and cutting. PW’s article also includes a helpful video.

Shadow Poetry: How to Make a Chapbook – This article from Shadow Poetry gives you advice about how to plan your chapbook, make a primary dummy book, get print shop estimates and more.

How to Make a Simple Chapbook – FeltMagnet provides an illustrated step-by-step guide to making your own chapbook.

DIY: 8-Panel Chapbooks – This visual aide offers a step-by-step guide to publishing 8-panel chapbooks. It shows you the cutting and folding process with photographs.

DIY Five-Step Chapbooks – This resource from Natalie Thompson includes instructions for making chapbooks that includes downloadable templates.

  • DIY Kettle Stitch Bookbinding Tutorial – This video from Sea Lemon shows you how to stitch together a larger-sized book.

  • This tutorial from Lynda.com shows you how print a booklet using Microsoft Word. It includes steps for two side printing and how to view your document as a booklet in Word.

    Here’s a video that shows you how to stitch together pages of a chapbook.

    Visit our book publishing section for more information about how to get your book published.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Strengthen your poetry skills.

    Poetry writing requires no license, no education, and no experience. All you need to get started is a pen and some paper. In fact, many writers discovered their calling because they were compelled to write poetry at a young age.

    But there’s a big difference between writing poetry and writing good poetry.

    Opinions about the art and craft of good poetry are many and varied. Some hold poetry to a high academic or literary standard. Others appreciate the fact that poetry writing provides a creative and healthy form of self-expression.

    I believe that all poetry is good in the sense that anything that comes from the heart or anything that speaks truth is good. The poem itself might not win any awards, but the act of writing it can be mood-altering, healing, and maybe even life-changing.

    Many poets pursue the craft with a clear goal: they want to get published. Others write poetry because they find solace in the work. They don’t care about readers, publication, or awards. And plenty of writers fall in between: they write for the joy of it but also with a desire to continually develop their poetry skills with hopes of getting published one day.

    Writing for Yourself

    There’s nothing wrong with writing poetry for yourself. Poetry writing has tremendous therapeutic and creative value. However, many young poets think they can get published and earn recognition without developing their poetry skills: they don’t read poetry; they don’t study the craft; they are not knowledgeable about poetic forms or literary devices. They offer the following arguments:

    • I don’t read poetry because I don’t want other poems to influence mine. I want my poetry to be raw and original.
    • I write from my heart; it’s a form of self-expression.
    • Poetry is an art form, so there are no rules.
    • It’s my style (I’ve heard this about poems written in all caps, for example).
    • My mom/friend/teacher said I have talent.

    There’s nothing inherently wrong with any of these arguments. But if you want to get published — if you want your work to be taken seriously by the literary world and by readers — you’re going to have to step up your game. You’ll have to stop making excuses and learn how to write better poetry.

    Tips for Writing Better Poetry

    When we first start writing poetry, our work is amateurish and awkward. We might make poems that are cute or silly, poems that don’t make much sense, or poems that are murky, excessive, or verbose. We express ourselves but fail to generate poems that compel readers. But with practice and by putting a little effort into our poetry writing, our poems can blossom and become riveting — for us and for our readers.

    Here are some tips to help you develop finer poetry writing skills:

    1. Read poetry: Too many young and new poets don’t read poetry. I get it. A lot of the poems you come across don’t grab your attention. The stuff you read in school was unwieldy. But if you look hard enough, you will discover good poetry that you will fall in love with. Go on a personal quest to find it. In order to grow as a writer, and especially as a poet, it’s imperative to familiarize yourself with the canon, which has already proven to resonate with readers. By seeking out established poets whose work you admire, you will build a roster of mentors. Try reading poems aloud. Keep a notebook or journal in which you can write your thoughts and responses to various works, and jot down your favorite excerpts. Bonus tip: you can also watch or listen to recorded or live poetry.
    2. Write regularly: Beginning poets have a tendency to take up the pen only when the mood strikes. By engaging your creativity on a daily basis, the very practice of poetry writing will become habitual and ingrained as part of your daily routine, and it is through daily practice that our poetry skills improve.
    3. Allow yourself to write badly: Allowing yourself a large margin for writing poorly or below your own standards will give you freedom in your writing and room to explore your poetry on broader and deeper levels.
    4. Study and learn to speak in poetics: Poets have their own language. When they mention couplets and iambic pentameter, you should know what they’re talking about. Study literary devices and learn how to use them in your own poetry. There are many books available that will help you understand poetry intricately and will familiarize you with terms and definitions, such as alliteration or trochee. Such books provide detailed analyses and teach you new ways to read and write poetry. To get started, look for A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver or try The Practice of Poetry (aff links) by Robin Behn and Chase Twichell.
    5. Poetry writing exercises: Writing exercises present challenges and provide new ways of thinking and being creative within an established framework. Some poetry exercises will produce your best work but also teach you to approach poetry in an innovative and more imaginative manner.
    6. Embrace best practices and techniques: It’s true that there are no rules in poetry, but there are a few best practices, like eliminate any unnecessary words, don’t arrange words awkwardly to fit a rhyme scheme, and use imagery. When it comes to poetry, you really want to follow the old adage: show, don’t tell.
    7. Seek feedback from objective, well-read people who are familiar with poetry. When something in your poem isn’t working for one of them, don’t say, “Oh, that’s my style.” And if it is your style, then consider that your “style” isn’t working.
    8. Revise. Revising your work goes hand in hand with allowing yourself to write badly. You can always go back and make changes. Some new writers insist that once they write a poem, that’s it. They believe the art should be preserved in its original form and never altered in any way. While this is certainly one way of looking at poetry as art, there is another philosophy that believes revision is necessary for true creative freedom. In knowing that you can go back and refine your work later, you will give yourself more liberty in your initial writing, opening creative channels to greater possibilities.

    Poetry Writing is an Adventure

    Poetry teaches us how to access rich language and produce vivid images in our writing. It is one of the best ways to develop comprehensive and creative writing skills, even if poetry writing isn’t really your thing. Poetry writing will take you on an exciting adventure through language, and the very act of working to improve your poetry is a journey that many writers find exhilarating.

    Do you have any tips for writing better poetry and developing your poetry skills? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment.

    Last year, some of the best-selling books in the world were poetry books, created by Instagram Poets like Rupi Kaur, Atticus, Nayyirah Waheed, and Nikita Gill. These poets, whose work appears in visual form all over social media and garners hundreds of thousands of followers, often found success in choosing to self-publish poetry. This way, they controlled the look and feel of the finished product, and they were able to get their book into the hands of their followers faster than with traditional publishing.

    Some of the most famous poetry books of all time were originally self-published and self-marketed, like Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman. There’s a long tradition of success with self-published poets, and this new generation is finding an audience dedicated to buying print. Success as a poet doesn’t depend on traditional publishing—now, less than ever.

    Have your own collection of poems? Here’s how to put your work in print, so it’s ready for the delight of your friends, fans, and followers:

    1. Write a lot of poems

    The average poetry collection is between 30 and 100 different poems. To create a unified collection of this size, you’re going to need a big body of work to pare down. So, get writing!

    2. Choose your poems

    Poetry collections aren’t just about putting all your poems together. They’re about creating a conversation between poems that are related and work together. Choose your poems around a particular theme, idea, style, subject—something with clear commonality to unify it.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    3. Decide on your poetry book format

    Your book format, in part, determines your number of poems. If you’re planning on black-and-white pages of text, then you’ll only need a Trade Book, and probably the smallest size. If your poems correlate with visual work, like sketches, photographs, or paintings, then you may want to explore Photo Books, which offer a range of sizes to complement any kind of work.

    4. Organize your poems

    Put your poems in order, so that the reader experiences them in the order that lets the conversation unfold. Putting the poems together and in order should, itself, feel like you’re writing a poem of poems.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    5. Edit your collection

    Just like poetry is about creating the deepest meaning with the most powerful, minimal language, you’ll need to ruthlessly edit your collection down to its most essential poems. Take out any poem that isn’t intimately connected to your theme and the others. Save the remaining poems for promoting your book, or for your next collection.

    6. Design your page layouts

    Poetry books are unique in that the white space around your text is as important as your text. Remember your poems need lots of room to breathe on the page, so people have space to think. Don’t put more than one poem per page, unless it’s a deliberate decision to link two poems that way. Let each one have its own page, and if its longer, as many pages as it needs to surround each part with plenty of white space.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    7. Create your poetry book

    The best part of self-publishing a poetry book is getting to make all the creative decisions yourself. YOU decide on paper type, cover, layout, size—all of it. Just be mindful that your book creation decisions have a direct impact on your ability to sell your self-published poetry book. You’ll need to balance your creative vision with the cost of creation so that you can still have a profit margin AND sell it at a price your friends, fans, and followers will pay. To create a Trade Book, which is priced to sell, you’ll need to use Blurb’s flagship free tool, BookWright.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    8. Upload your book and order a proof

    No matter how many times you edit your poetry book, how many times you and other people have read it on the screen, there will be inconsistencies and gaps you can’t catch until you’ve printed it. Order a single print copy and check every page and every margin. Read it backwards, give it to a friend or professional proofreader—whatever it takes—to find all the mistakes. Your book cannot be edited or changed once it goes into distribution, so you’ll need to catch all the mistakes up front.

    9. Revise and proof your book again

    Once you’ve made your edits, order another proof and double check. Sometimes making changes causes new errors, and again, once your poetry book goes into distribution, it’s not possible to make any changes.

    10. Set your book up for sale

    Blurb books can be sold through the Blurb Bookstore, or they can be put into distribution through Amazon and others. Blurb Photo Books and Trade Books take different selling paths to Amazon, but if you’re working with a digital audience, they can buy your book from any link. How you set your poetry book up for sale depends on the best fit for your profit goals and your audience.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    If you’re a poet, this is the time to shine. You have more opportunities than ever to build your audience, and more platforms for selling your self-published poetry book. The work you are doing to give language to the human experience and illuminate those human moments belongs in the hands of your readers. Put your poems in print and open new channels—not only for profit—but for getting your words into the world.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Poetry is perhaps the most difficult form of literature to publish traditionally—but don’t worry! Self-publishing poetry is easier and much more rewarding than the traditional route. In this case, you have full control of the publishing process. If you’re ready to take control of your publishing journey, follow the steps below to get started!

    In this article, follow the steps to learn how to:

    Where to Publish Poetry

    Publishing doesn’t just have to be in the traditional sense of creating copies of a book to distribute. If you’re looking to publish your poetry for the world to read, then it’s worth exploring all the different ways.

    1. Social media. A risk-free, beginner-friendly way to start gaining an audience for your poetry is by creating a dedicated author Instagram or Facebook account. Share your poetry along with inspirational quotes and images to form a clear brand and messaging.
    2. Online poet communities. Websites like All Poetry and Hello Poetry allow you to publish your own poetry online, read others’, and get solid advice from more experienced writers.
    3. Journal and magazines. Feel like you have a winning piece? Enter contents or even submit your piece to a number of journals and magazines.
    4. Your local community. To gain more of a local audience, you can get creative and sell your work on postcards, magnets, and other merchandise at farmers markets. Additionally, you can frame some shorter pieces and ask around at local coffee shops to see who would like to display them.
    5. Self-publish. Keep reading below!

    5 Easy Steps to Self-Publishing Poetry

    The first step to self-publishing poetry is to write a lot of poems, of course. If you’re reading this, you’ve probably already completed this step, so we’ll skip to the next step so you can get started learning how to self-publish a poetry book right away.

    Self-publishing poetry involves many of the same steps one would follow to self-publish any type of book, so we will focus on the steps that are specific to poetry books.

    1. Edit your poetry and get feedback from fellow poets and experienced professionals. .

    While editing your own work is essential, you might also consider having a professional go over your poems to get feedback and correct any errors you may have missed yourself.

    You can join poetry writing groups and workshops to get feedback from other writers. This can be a valuable resource for not only improving your craft, but for staying inspired and motivated to write, which can help you continue building your career as a poet as well.

    2. Organize your poetry to create a collection with a unified theme, topic, or style. . ➕.

    An important skill to hone when learning how to self-publish a poetry book is curating a collection.

    Unlike other forms of writing, when it comes to poetry, less is more. For this reason, you’ll need to curate a collection that is unified. Order your poetry books in a way that best showcases your poem.

    Be selective and skillful when compiling a collection of poetry to publish. This will make advertising and selling your poems to readers much easier because you will have a unified theme or vision to pitch.

    Bonus tip: Keep in mind that you do not need to publish every poem you write or publish all of your poems in one book! Maximize your content by publishing several collections over a period of time. This is important if you are looking to build a career and to make money writing poetry.

    3. Establish an online presence and join online poetry and book communities to begin marketing your poetry book. .

    When self-publishing any work, it’s important to create and maintain a relationship with your audience, and the best way to do that with today’s technology is to use social media, websites, and newsletters. Find your audience and connect with them, whether it’s before or after your book is published.

    While poets have been writing poems for nearly all of human existence, it’s important to notice current trends, such as Instagram and Tumblr users sharing poems in the form of images and design typography.

    Joining these social media communities could be a useful book marketing strategy to gain both an audience and recognition for your work.

    4. Decide the format of your book and have the interior and a cover designed. .

    This step involves deciding the best method for how to self-publish a poetry book. During this step, you should decide whether you want to publish your book in print and/or eBook format. In addition, you should decide whether it is appropriate to include book illustrations.

    Keep in mind that, designing and formatting poetry books are more difficult than books written in prose. In this case, poems are often formatted with irregular spacing and line breaks.

    This also means that getting the design and format of your book right is even more important because you want your readers to be able to view each poem in its intended format.

    5. Get your book distributed so your audience can purchase your poetry from every major book retailer. .

    While the formatting and design of your poetry book are very important, the most important step is making sure your book is available for readers to purchase from all major retailers.

    Whether you decide to publish in print or with eBooks, Gatekeeper Press has professional formatting and distribution services to make sure your book looks great and is for sale all over the world, without sacrificing your profits or rights.

    To Publish or Not to Publish: That Is (Not Even) The Question.

    Congratulations! Now you know how to publish a book of poetry. Are you willing to take the next step? Begin by writing down your personalized plan by outlining how you’ll tackle each of the steps mentioned above.

    Self-publishing poetry can be a long process, but now that you know the steps ahead of you, you can get started by getting a quote or free consultation at Gatekeeper Press.

    Begin here!

    “I was thrilled when I realized that I could create my own book, finally my writings came to life! Now I have my own books, beautiful and very colourful with recipes, poems and other writings. I even gathered one of my friend’s letters and printed a small booklet which I gave as a birthday gift to her.”
    /Laura, 39 years old

    Make something out of your own writings and lyrics! Maybe you have your own story, novel, poem, letter, recipe, blog or other texts? Make a unique and beautiful book of your own! Solentro helps you discover the joy in writing!

    • Blog
    • Diary
    • Recipe
    • Short story
    • Novel
    • Letters
    • Poems
    • Poetry
    • Menu’s
    • Song lyrics
    • Book of remembrance

    What type of book would you like to do?

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Solentro – make your own book

    We strive to be the best & easiest way for you to create your own personalized book or photo book. Read more.

    Photo book – an easy way to gather your photos and design your own photo book. Full creative freedom when you make your own photo book or photo album!

    Recipe cookbook – gather your recipes in a beautiful recipe cookbook of the highest quality!

    Yearbook – invite your classmates to write a greeting and gather everything in your own yearbook / graduation book, a memory for life! Also suitable for homecoming and/or prom.

    School project – make a unique book of your school project. Make a book in our system and use the templates, designs and fonts that we offer, or you can create your book in any editing software of your choice!

    Book of remembrance – when someone passes away the memories remain. Make your own book of remembrance. Ask your loved ones to write something about the person, gather memories and photos. Gather it all in a very beautiful book of remembrance.

    Christening book – give away a beautiful christening book with personal greetings and images related. Write down the funny events and memories from the child’s early path in life – the child’s very own christening book!

    Softcover Basic – Our Softcover Basic book is of the highest quality and an excellent choice for those who, for example, want to publish their own book and want to print many books in black/white!

    Wedding book – why write sprawling greetings in a guest book at the wedding when you can make your own, personal and yet very professional wedding book! A popular gift for the bachelorette party, bachelor party or wedding – make your own wedding book!

    Blog to book – no matter what you blog about, it’s a great feeling to have your own blog printed as a real book standing in the bookshelf – make your own blog to book!

    Retirement book – give away something that touches and turns into a memory for life – a beautiful retirement book! We promise that a photo book with personalized greetings and pictures from colleagues is a much appreciated gift when someone retires. Use the invite-feature to gather greetings and photos automatically into the book.

    Novel / Poemsmake your own book of all your texts and writings! It is very easy to gather your texts and design your book – make your own book!

    My first book – add text, upload photos, select design and gather everything in a beautiful book of the highest quality. An unbeatable memory for the entire family – make your own “My first book” today!

    Birthday book – that’s how it all started; a unique book as a gift to our father on his birthday. We contacted friends and family, asking them to describe him as a person and put together the lyrics to a birthday book, an unforgettable gift – make your own birthday book too!

    Ancestry book – put together your family tree, uncover your ethnic mix, distant relatives, and even new ancestors and gather your family history in a unique family book. Your ancestry book will be a memory for more than one lifetime!

    Begin here!

    “I was thrilled when I realized that I could create my own book, finally my writings came to life! Now I have my own books, beautiful and very colourful with recipes, poems and other writings. I even gathered one of my friend’s letters and printed a small booklet which I gave as a birthday gift to her.”
    /Laura, 39 years old

    Make something out of your own writings and lyrics! Maybe you have your own story, novel, poem, letter, recipe, blog or other texts? Make a unique and beautiful book of your own! Solentro helps you discover the joy in writing!

    • Blog
    • Diary
    • Recipe
    • Short story
    • Novel
    • Letters
    • Poems
    • Poetry
    • Menu’s
    • Song lyrics
    • Book of remembrance

    What type of book would you like to do?

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Solentro – make your own book

    We strive to be the best & easiest way for you to create your own personalized book or photo book. Read more.

    Photo book – an easy way to gather your photos and design your own photo book. Full creative freedom when you make your own photo book or photo album!

    Recipe cookbook – gather your recipes in a beautiful recipe cookbook of the highest quality!

    Yearbook – invite your classmates to write a greeting and gather everything in your own yearbook / graduation book, a memory for life! Also suitable for homecoming and/or prom.

    School project – make a unique book of your school project. Make a book in our system and use the templates, designs and fonts that we offer, or you can create your book in any editing software of your choice!

    Book of remembrance – when someone passes away the memories remain. Make your own book of remembrance. Ask your loved ones to write something about the person, gather memories and photos. Gather it all in a very beautiful book of remembrance.

    Christening book – give away a beautiful christening book with personal greetings and images related. Write down the funny events and memories from the child’s early path in life – the child’s very own christening book!

    Softcover Basic – Our Softcover Basic book is of the highest quality and an excellent choice for those who, for example, want to publish their own book and want to print many books in black/white!

    Wedding book – why write sprawling greetings in a guest book at the wedding when you can make your own, personal and yet very professional wedding book! A popular gift for the bachelorette party, bachelor party or wedding – make your own wedding book!

    Blog to book – no matter what you blog about, it’s a great feeling to have your own blog printed as a real book standing in the bookshelf – make your own blog to book!

    Retirement book – give away something that touches and turns into a memory for life – a beautiful retirement book! We promise that a photo book with personalized greetings and pictures from colleagues is a much appreciated gift when someone retires. Use the invite-feature to gather greetings and photos automatically into the book.

    Novel / Poemsmake your own book of all your texts and writings! It is very easy to gather your texts and design your book – make your own book!

    My first book – add text, upload photos, select design and gather everything in a beautiful book of the highest quality. An unbeatable memory for the entire family – make your own “My first book” today!

    Birthday book – that’s how it all started; a unique book as a gift to our father on his birthday. We contacted friends and family, asking them to describe him as a person and put together the lyrics to a birthday book, an unforgettable gift – make your own birthday book too!

    Ancestry book – put together your family tree, uncover your ethnic mix, distant relatives, and even new ancestors and gather your family history in a unique family book. Your ancestry book will be a memory for more than one lifetime!

    Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Microsoft Word comes with pre-built page settings for creating books. Whether you’re creating a memoir or event guide, these settings let you create a beautiful book or booklet, from start to finish.

    Create a Book or Booklet

    First, go ahead and open Word. It’s recommended that you adjust these setting before writing the content of your book to prevent formatting issues late on.

    Once you’re in Word, head over to the “Layout” tab. In the “Page Setup” group, click the small arrow at the bottom-right.

    This opens the “Page Setup” window, where you will automatically be on the “Margin” tab. In the “Margins” group, you’re able to set the margins of the page. By default, the “Gutter” margin will be set to 0. This could cause issues further on, as the gutter margin is the amount of space between the content of your book and the fold where the pages of the book will be bound together. That said, go ahead and give the gutter a 1” margin, so the content of your book doesn’t get lost in the fold.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Next, select the arrow next to “Multiple Pages” in the “Pages” group, then select “Book Fold” from the drop-down menu. Once selected, you’ll notice your page orientation automatically changes from “Portrait” to “Landscape.”

    Tip: You may notice a “Reverse Book Fold” option. This is for content that reads from right to left, such as Japanese-style books.

    Once you’ve adjusted the settings, click “OK.”

    The page setup for creating a book or booklet is now complete. There’s a ton of stuff you can do from here depending on what you require for your book. You may want to add a header or footer, create a table of contents, or give your book page numbers for easier navigation. We’ll leave the content and add-ons to you—we’re just here to show you how to create the setup.

    It’s also worth noting that, depending on the length of your document, you may need to split it up into multiple booklets due to the sheer size of the document. That’s fine—you can bind them into one book later.

    Print Your Book or Booklet

    Once you’ve finished composing your book, it’s time for printing. Select the “File” tab, then select “Print” found in the left-hand pane.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Next, select the second option in the “Settings” group.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    A drop-down menu will appear, presenting a few different printing-style options. If you have a duplex printer, select (1) “Print on Both Sides” (and whether or not to flip the page on the long or short edge). If your printer doesn’t have this functionality, you’ll need to select the (2) “Manually Print on Both Sides” option.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    All that’s left to do now is select Print, and you’re good to go!

    Page Of Old Book For Blackout Poetry. Pollari uses the text of an application for naturalization as a source. Then click the blackout poetry maker link to try it yourself.

    How to create a book of your original poetryPin by Cary Dunagan on Blackout Poetry Love book quotes from www.pinterest.com

    Austin kleon is a blackout poet. They can be created using the pages of old books or even articles cut from yesterdays newspaper. See more ideas about poetry, blackout poetry, found poetry.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Blackout poetry instructions follow this guide to uncover a hidden poem! Make blackout poetry is a collection of texts that you can repurpose for your own poems.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Make blackout poetry is a collection of texts that you can repurpose for your own poems. Find hidden gems in vintage etiquette manuals, slang dictionaries, newspapers, and more.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    A page taken from an old book, with certain words left uncovered by painting to create a found poetry style statement, then applied to a page in an old style type. Draw a clear box around all the words youve selected.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Take a picture of the page. Austin kleon is a blackout poet.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Black out poetry, fun poetry activity, blackout poem lecture slides, free. Materials needed for blackout poetry.

    Glue (Not Required) Construction Paper (Not Required) Notes Regarding Children If You Are Doing This Activity With Children It’s Important To Have Materials They Can Read.

    Newspaper, magazine, menu, old book etc. Pollari uses the text of an application for naturalization as a source. Go back and add connector words to create sentences and a poem.

    Make Blackout Poetry Is A Collection Of Texts That You Can Repurpose For Your Own Poems.

    Obviously you don’t want to be taking sharpies to the library books, so you can photocopy a few pages in advance for the kids to work on. Blackout poetry instructions follow this guide to uncover a hidden poem! See more ideas about poetry, blackout poetry, found poetry.

    The Book Begins With An Introduction By John Carroll, Founder Of Make.

    Take a screenshot and email it to [email protected] Place the tracing paper over a book page and start looking for a few interesting words. It’s satisfying and rewarding to create a new piece of art from an existing one.

    A Page Taken From An Old Book, With Certain Words Left Uncovered By Painting To Create A Found Poetry Style Statement, Then Applied To A Page In An Old Style Type.

    The third poem is an example of erasure poetry, not blackout poetry, but we include this in our examples list as the two forms accomplish something similar. They can be created using the pages of old books or even articles cut from yesterdays newspaper. Draw a clear box around all the words youve selected.

    The Words That Jump Out To You Initially Are The Most Likely To Have Importance Or Significance.

    A page taken from an old book, with certain words left uncovered by painting to create a found poetry style statement, then applied to a page in an old style type journal/ledger. Austin kleon is a blackout poet. Scan your page and circle or underline the words that stand out to you.

    You wrote a book of poetry; now, how do you sell it? The most important thing is to overcome your resistance to the idea of marketing and selling your book of poems. Most poets and writers don’t love the branding, marketing, publicizing and selling part of book publishing! I get it. I’m one of those published authors who hates marketing and selling my own book, Growing Forward When You Can’t Go Back.

    I’m not a poet, but even I resist the idea of marketing something as beautiful as a book of poems. Selling poetry books seems like it goes against a law of nature – like selling air, or shades of golden sunshine, or soft green grass.

    But writers have to learn how to market and sell their poetry books! Otherwise how will readers enjoy the beauty, depth and insights in the poems? If you’re one of those poets who is reluctantly searching for tips on how to market and sell poetry books, you might want to read my Sample Marketing Plan for a Christian Nonfiction Self-Help Book. Not only did I do a ton of research, I also got input from my literary agent, editor, and book publisher.

    The key is to find book marketing and sales tips that work for you as the poet. Consider your personality, lifestyle, hobbies, and even your daily routine. You might even use creative, unusual book marketing and sales strategies that align with your poems. For example, if your poetry is about gardening you might include a packet of seeds or a hoe with every book purchase. The best “marketing strategies” don’t feel or seem like marketing at all! And they sell lots of books 🙂

    These five tips for marketing your book of poems are from published poet and freelance writer, Cherie Burbach. Her latest poetry book is Poiema: New and Selected Poems. I asked Cherie to share one of her favorite quotes about poetry, and she sent me this:

    “Happiness is sharing a bowl of cherries and a book of poetry with a shade tree. He doesn’t eat much and doesn’t read much, but listens well and is a most gracious host.”

    5 Ways to Market and Sell Your Poetry Book

    A guest post from Cherie Burbach.

    You’ve written a poetry book – congratulations! Now comes the hard part: getting people to buy it. While it’s true that poetry books don’t sell as much as other works overall, there is a market for them. You just need to reach the right audience.

    1. Get book reviews for your poetry

    Without reviews, people will be very leery to buy your book of poems. While it’s nice to get a glowing review from a friend, it’s even better to get a professionally written (honest) assessment. This is true even if the reviewer didn’t care for your poetry book. Professional reviewers can highlight your book’s strengths and give a realistic assessment of where it fell short. Ironically, this kind of honesty will actually motivate people to buy a book more than an artificial (“Awesome poetry book. ”) review will.

    Getting book reviews today is no easy task, but there are still plenty of places that provide them. If a book reviewer asks for money, don’t think you’re paying for a good review! Paying a book reviewer simply means they’re covering their time and cost. Don’t listen to the folks who say a non-paid review is the only one you should seek. With major media outlets pulling their book review sections, more and more freelance writers are offering to do book reviews. Some of them charge, and they may be worth the price. Check it out.

    2. Go on a virtual poetry book tour

    There are a couple ways to do a virtual blog or book tour: you could set it up yourself or hire a marketer. Virtual tours aren’t difficult to organize, but they do take a tremendous amount of time. If you’re a reluctant salesperson – or if you’re just learning how to market and sell your poetry book – you may want to consider hiring a book publicist to help you.

    I wrote an ebook called Virtual Book Tours that offers a full description on how to publicize your books. You could also learn more by searching the internet for “virtual poetry book tours” or some variation (such as poetry blog tours or poetry book marketing tours). The cost of a poetry book tour usually ranges from $300 to $1,000 for a 15-20 stop tour. Remember that selling and marketing anything – especially a poetry book, which is a luxury item – costs money!

    3. Write poetry-related guest posts and magazine articles

    To attract new readers, figure out how your book of poems is different and unique. Write guest posts related to it. Some possibilities include:

    • how you sold and published your poetry
    • any artwork involved (especially if you designed the cover yourself)
    • benefits of writing poetry (did it help heal you from pain? help you deal with a specific issue?)
    • who the poetry honors (did you write it with someone – famous or not – in mind?)
    • is the poetry related to a specific part of the globe (did you write about your hometown?)

    Websites such as HARO, Twitter, Yahoo Shine, Divine Caroline, and American Chronicle are all good places to explore when you’re marketing and selling your book of poems.

    Are you reluctant to approach a magazine or even a blog because you haven’t written a poetry book before? Read How to Write an Author Bio When You’ve Never Been Published.

    4. Advertise your poetry book

    Every business needs advertising! Your published poetry book is no different. Luckily, Adsense and Facebook are cost-effective ways to market and sell books, and can reach a variety of readers.

    An important thing to consider before placing an ad to market your poetry is keywords. This is the number one most important thing when marketing your book online. Don’t use “poetry” or “poems” as your top keywords. Instead, focus on the specifics of your poetry book.

    For my first poetry book (New and Selected Poems) I used these words: empowerment, faith, overcoming abuse, self-esteem, Christian poetry, inspirational poetry books, and poems with a female perspective. Being specific will help you reach readers who want to read your poems. It also takes you from having to learn how to market and sell your poetry book to simply finding kindred spirits.

    Do you feel reluctant, overwhelmed, or even uneasy about selling and marketing your poems? Read The 8 Essential Traits of Every Poet’s Personality.

    5. Set up an Amazon author page

    If your book isn’t on Amazon yet, get it on there! It’s easy; nearly every publisher and writer, large and small, can do it. Since I publish my poetry books through Lightning Source, they take care of creating and updating my Amazon author page for me.

    Even if your publisher sets up your author page on Amazon, you need to personalize it. Share your personality, interests, and even why you write poetry. Include an RSS feed for your blog, start discussion topics, post videos, and a bio. An Amazon author page a nice homepage that includes a listing of your books along with other information so readers can find out more about you.

    For more book marketing and sales tips, read 6 Ways to Promote Your Book for Free.

    As holidays or birthdays approach, many people ponder a question: what do you get for someone who has everything? What can you get that this person doesn’t already have? What can you get that will thrill or excite this person, or warm her heart?

    A Fun Gift Idea: Make Your Own Story Into a Book

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    • A Fun Gift Idea: Make Your Own Story Into a Book

    As holidays and birthdays approach, many people ponder a question: what do you get for the person who has everything? Or the money to buy everything? What can you get that this person doesn’t already have? What can you get that will thrill or excite this person, or warm her heart? It’s a tough quandary, but there is a brilliant solution. You can’t buy love or happiness or memories or creativity. Why don’t you capture all of these and make your own story into a book? It is the perfect gift because it is personal! It should be fun and entertaining as well. How do you start?

    It is very easy, much easier than you may think, to create a fabulous book. You can always just go the simplest route: buying a photo album and filling it with your favorite photographs or treasured keepsakes. This is guaranteed to bring a smile to the recipient’s face. However, is it unique enough? If you want to take book making to the next level, try a kit or online site that helps you assemble your story into outstanding book format.

    Now, there are various types of kits that you can get to help you with this. Some, like Make Your Own Book: A Running Press Discovery Kit, by Matthew Liddle. It offers everything you need to make your own book, including: blank pages, materials to sew them together, and a blank dust jacket. You can create a homemade, yet polished-looking, book with ease. And it will be a lot of fun.

    There are other kits which are slightly different. Illustory is a kit which provides instructions, a story web planner, cover pages, book pages, washable markers, internet Production drawing tools, a prepaid envelope, and an order form. What are these last two for? For your book, of course! You assemble your book and then send it to be printed with pro-quality. While many of these kits are exciting choices, they may not offer the level of quality you’re looking for.

    A kit like these will be ideal for kids’ books. However, you can take your work one step further if you wish. Want to know the best part? If you want to write longer pieces, even a novel, you will have great luck with sites like Bookemon. These allow you to assemble your cookbook, book of photography, collection of short stories, history of Italian sculpture, guide to stars, or how to book on arts and crafts. Anything that you can think and create can be made into a perfect book and gift. You control each design element, from the type of font to the position of pictures. Wouldn’t anyone love to read an original, printed-just-for-their-eyes novel? What a gift!

    Easy to use and very affordable, Bookemon offers a level of quality that other kits cannot. What’s more is that they offer a lasting product hanging on to for generations.

    There are many ways to make your story into a real, polished, quality book. This is not only a unique present, but also one that will be cherished for years. It is guaranteed to put you on at least one person’s bestseller list.

    Visual artists sometimes talk about using “found objects” in their artwork. In other words, they collect interesting things during the course of a normal day (such as bus tickets, objects from nature, or a toy found on the street) and then find a way to incorporate those objects into their artwork.

    Did you know that you can do the same thing with language? A “found poem” is created by collecting interesting text from the world around us and then using those words to make a poem. When you create poetry this way, you are acting like a documentary filmmaker—using scenes from real life to tell an interesting story.

    Here are three simple and fun ways to create “found poetry” from the language that is all around you.

    Collect Words to Use Later

    How to create a book of your original poetryFirst, put an index card in your pocket or backpack to carry with you. All day long, whenever you hear or see a word that is unusual, beautiful, funny, or otherwise interesting to you, write it down on the index card. You could write down what you hear people saying to each other during the day.

    Other places to collect words include magazine or book covers, street signs, flyers or banners, or addresses on envelopes. Also, pay attention to the text used for ads and other types of product information, such as TV commercials, billboards, or even the writing on the back of a cereal box.

    You can add words or phrases from any of these sources onto your index card. That night, try to use all of the words on your card to write a poem. Remember, you can choose to mix up the order of the words on the card. Add as many new words as you need so that your poem feels finished.

    Turning Junk into Poetry

    Find a piece of junk mail with a lot of words printed on it. (Be sure to check with your parents about what piece of mail is okay for you to experiment with, since you will be making permanent marks on it.)

    Use a bright yellow marker to highlight the most interesting words or phrases that are already printed on the page. Look for words that you like because of how they are spelled, what they mean, or how they sound when you speak them aloud.

    Now switch to a dark colored marker, such as black or purple. Fill in all of the spaces between the highlighted words. When you do this, you will even color over the non-highlighted words with the dark marker.

    You should now have a solid black or purple page except for a few bright yellow words, which will form a poem. If you use more than one piece of junk mail, you might want to make a very long poem or use each separate page as a different stanza in the poem.

    Creating an Altered Poem

    Choose an existing poem that you enjoy. It might be a poem that you have written or a famous poem that you like to read. Print out a new copy of the poem from your computer or make a photocopy out of a book.

    Now, use scissors to cut up the text of the poem into phrases or even single words. Mix them all up, then create a new poem with them.

    If the original poem was a famous one, try to make up a title for the new poem that explains how you were inspired by the old one. For a more advanced challenge, you could find two famous poems that are very different, such as “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost and “The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe, and use at least half of the words from each poem to create a brand-new hybrid poem.

    Your Turn!

    Poetry is everywhere you look (and listen), so just keep your eyes and ears open. When you try out these three “found poem” techniques, you will find that experimenting is the best part. There’s no wrong way to make a poem, so have fun!

    Ok, so I get this question all the time, and to the best of my knowledge I’ve never written an article about it. People email me and say, “Hey if I send my manuscript to a publisher will they steal my work?” The author of the email is somewhat frantic usually. They are very concerned that a publisher is going to steal the manuscript, publish it, and leave the author out of the loop of making money from the work.

    This isn’t a big problems in the publishing world, to be honest. This idea, generally, is not how work is plagiarized, and most of the time writers do not need to protect their work from publishers, and they certainly do not need to protect their work from legitimate publishers. Generally publishers make money from not only the books that they sell written by authors, but they make money from the relationships they build with those authors. This means most of the time you don’t have to worry about a book publisher taking your book and publishing it without your permissions.

    There is always risk when you are looking to gain something, so if you publish your novel online as a serial most-likely it will be fine. It is better of course to shop it to publishers or at least publish it yourself through a self-publisher. Make your profit from the work before you let it out there for free unless you have a lot to gain by giving it away. Do your research before you publish online, you never know what can happen.

    The Design Your Own Poem option is intended for customers to have their original poems, verses and remarks put into one of our designs or frames. This option also allows you to give someone a very unique present for a birthday, anniversary, etc. Great personalized gift idea for family and friends. It is also a wonderful way to have a verse designed that is in a language other than English. Frame a poem today!

    NOTE: Ordering a Design Your Own Poem does not add any extra processing time to the normal shipping schedule.

    If you would like your poem in a design that is not shown below please contact us and include your poem and the item # of the design on this site that you would like your words designed in. Be sure to include an email address that you check often because we will email you letting you know if your poem will fit in the design that you have chosen and how to order your gift.

    Let one of our experienced graphic artists lay out your poem in your choice of design and frame. Make your friends and family feel special. With your poem and our expertise we can help you create a one-of-a-kind treasured keepsake.

    Poetry For Dummies

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    How to write a sonnet

    The Shakespearean rhyme scheme

    Every A rhymes with every A, every B rhymes with every B, and so forth. You’ll notice this type of sonnet consists of three quatrains (that is, four consecutive lines of verse that make up a stanza or division of lines in a poem) and one couplet (two consecutive rhyming lines of verse).

    How a sonnet tells a story

    First quatrain: An exposition of the main theme and main metaphor.

    Second quatrain: Theme and metaphor extended or complicated; often, some imaginative example is given.

    Third quatrain: Peripeteia (a twist or conflict), often introduced by a “but” (very often leading off the ninth line).

    Couplet: Summarizes and leaves the reader with a new, concluding image.

    One of Shakespeare’s best-known sonnets, Sonnet 18, follows this pattern:

    Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.

    Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed;

    But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest, Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest.

    So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

    First quatrain: Shakespeare establishes the theme of comparing “thou” (or “you”) to a summer’s day, and why to do so is a bad idea. The metaphor is made by comparing his beloved to summer itself.

    Second quatrain: Shakespeare extends the theme, explaining why even the sun, supposed to be so great, gets obscured sometimes, and why everything that’s beautiful decays from beauty sooner or later. He has shifted the metaphor: In the first quatrain, it was “summer” in general, and now he’s comparing the sun and “every fair,” every beautiful thing, to his beloved.

    Third quatrain: Here the argument takes a big left turn with the familiar “But.” Shakespeare says that the main reason he won’t compare his beloved to summer is that summer dies — but she won’t. He refers to the first two quatrains — her “eternal summer” won’t fade, and she won’t “lose possession” of the “fair” (the beauty) she possesses. So, he keeps the metaphors going, but in a different direction.

    And for good measure, he throws in a negative version of all the sunshine in this poem — the “shade” of death, which, evidently, his beloved won’t have to worry about.

    Couplet: How is his beloved going to escape death? In Shakespeare’s poetry, which will keep her alive as long as people breathe or see. This bold statement gives closure to the whole argument — it’s a surprise.

    And so far, Shakespeare’s sonnet has done what he promised it would! See how tightly this sonnet is written, how complex, yet well-organized it is? Now that you know how to write a sonnet, try writing one your own!

    Poets are attracted by the grace, concentration, and, yes, the sheer difficulty of sonnets. You may never write another sonnet in your life, but this exercise is more than just busywork. It does all the following:

    Shows you how much you can pack into a short form.

    Gives you practice with rhyme, meter, structure, metaphor, and argument.

    Connects you with one of the oldest traditions in English poetry — one still vital today.

    In addition to participating in the Dear Poet project with students, here are a number of creative and inexpensive suggestions for bringing poetry into the classroom during April’s National Poetry Month and throughout the year. These tips were developed with the help of the Dodge Poetry Festival, the National Council of Teachers of English, and Teachers & Writers Collaborative.

    • Meet with other teachers and local poets to talk about how to teach poetry to young people.
    • Talk with your school librarian about ordering books and creating a poetry book display. Consider incorporating the latest National Poetry Month poster.
    • Order a poetry anthology or other poetry books for your class.
    • Attend poetry readings in your community.
    • Contact your state arts council or your local literary center.
    • Reread some favorite poems.
    • Post favorite poems in faculty and staff lounges.
    • Write at least one poem before beginning a unit on poetry
    • Begin each class with a poem by a different poet.
    • Read a poem over the public address system each morning.
    • Ask students to memorize poems and then recite them from memory.
    • Read poems aloud to your students.
    • Organize a student poetry reading at your local library or bookstore.
    • Organize a Skype poetry reading where your students can interact with students from another part of the country or world.
    • Organize a field trip to a local nursing home and have students read poems to the elderly.
    • Ask each student to create his or her own anthology of favorite poems.
    • Introduce a new poetic form each week and give examples of poems that use—or reinvent—the form.
    • Publish student poetry in your school newspaper or magazine, or on your website.
    • Publish a special anthology of student poems.
    • Create a school poem and ask each student to contribute one line.
    • Give students a list of words and ask them to create a poem using those words.
    • Invite students to write poems in response to their favorite poems (or to news stories, songs, TV shows, or artworks).
    • Encourage students to write in the voice of someone else—a parent, friend, or teacher.
    • Have your students discuss several works by a specific poet by comparing and contrasting his/her poems.
    • Hold poetry workshops where students discuss one another‘s work.
    • Have your students write short poems, put them in balloons, and set them free.
    • Have students write a poem in the style of a particular poet.
    • Create and send poetry greeting cards to celebrate National Poetry Month.
    • Challenge students to create a poetry notebook and write one poem per day for every day in April.
    • Participate in National Poem in Your Pocket Day with your class.
    • Film students reading their own poems or poems by others. Encourage them to share the recordings with parents and friends.
    • Have students give an oral report on the poet of their choice while performing as the poet. Have the student recite some of the poet‘s work.
    • Plan a field trip to a local poetry site (a poet‘s former home, gravesite, etc.)
    • Invite local poets to your school for readings, workshops, or discussions, or ask poets from different parts of the country to talk to your class via Skype.
    • Have your class vote on five poems to hand out in the cafeteria.
    • Decorate the classroom or the school with illustrated poems and pictures of poets.
    • Hold a poetry exchange day with poems wrapped as gifts.
    • Encourage your local newspaper to sponsor a contest for student poets.
    • Organize a poetry contest for teachers and administrators and select students to act as judges.

    Success Stories from Past Years

    The schools that had the greatest success during National Poetry Month were those in which individual teachers and librarians developed creative ways of making poetry a more important and visible part of daily life in school.

    Tiny Mobile Inc.

    Designed for iPad

      • 3.7 • 128 Ratings
      • Free
      • Offers In-App Purchases

    Screenshots

    Description

    Ever wonder what it would be like to mash-up a Shakespeare poem with a Hip Hop Song? Verses is a new iPhone and iPad app that puts a fresh spin on a cherished classic: refrigerator magnet poetry. We built this app to set your creativity ablaze with Verses’s limitless word mixing possibilities that allow you to become a kind of dictionary DJ. After creating a poem out of your own personal mix of dictionaries, you can send your creation to friends via email or publish it in your Facebook photo album! (network connectivity required)

    Arranging words into your own poetry is much easier and smoother (and thus more enjoyable) using Verses, as opposed to the original “real life” fridge magnets. But even more enjoyable is the pleasure of sharing your poetic creations with friends. With the click of a button, you can publish your poem to Facebook (assuming you’re logged in). Then ALL of your friends can see your creativity, not just the ones who happen to be in standing in front of your fridge (Facebook account and network connectivity required). Plus you can email your poetry directly to your friends, all without ever leaving the app. You can also save your poetry to your device’s photo album.

    Verses comes with 4 dictionaries, including:

    •Old School Words
    •New School Words
    •’The’ Dictionary
    •If Ands Or Buts Dictionary

    You can also buy premium dictionaries for an additional cost, which can add even more flavor and character to your poems. Premium dictionaries are available as optional in-app purchases and include:

    •Hip-Hop Dictionary
    •Beatnik Dictionary
    •60’s Dictionary 1
    •60’s Dictionary 2
    •LOL-tionary
    •Sci-Fi Dictionary
    •Shakespeare Dictionary
    •19th & 20th Century Dictionary

    We’ve also added Achievements that will track your progress and keep a tally of your own personal “Poetry Score.”

    How to create a book of your original poetryTelling a story with words is fun, but being able to tell a story with a poem is even more challenging, imaginative, and entertaining for an audience. Spoken word poetry is a form of poetry where the author will present their poem to an audience, or out load, using narration. When you hear spoken poetry being performed, you will notice that there are many differences when compared to other types of poetry. As more of an oral language is being used, expressions and emotions are portrayed differently.

    If you want to convey your opinions and thoughts through a performance, let’s take a look at some famous spoken word poems, as well as how you can write a spoken word poem yourself.

    How to Write a Spoken Word Poem

    Step 1: Select a topic for your poem. As with anything that you write, make sure that you have a strong and expressive opinion about the topic that you choose. Remember that you are going to have to incorporate a good deal of passion and feeling into reading a spoken word poem.

    Step 2: Once you have chosen your topic, take some time to think about the subject that you have selected. Get out a piece of scratch paper and write down the initial words that come to mind when you think about your topic. When you are finished, look through your words and choose the one that you feel best explains your topic of interest.

    Step 3: Go ahead and start writing your poem. Spoken word poetry is very free flowing, and you can use any and all different types of punctuation to get your point across. For instance, you can incorporate commas, brackets, or dashes into your poem. Your audience will not see your poem –they will hear it. For this reason, there are no rules regarding the number of beats in spoken word poetry.

    Step 4: When you are finished with your poem, it is important to edit. Proofread it yourself or ask any friends or family to edit your poem for you. Remember that the length of your poem is up to you, but spoken word poems tend to be longer than other types of poetry. Take into consideration what others have to say about your poem, but keep in mind that you always have the final say in your writing.

    Step 5: There are plenty of other spoken word poets that you can easily watch online. Observe how they perform their poems and what they use to grab the attention of their audience. Pay attention to the gestures their hand movements and gestures while performing. You can decide to pick and choose from other poets what will work best when it comes to your performance.

    Step 6: Since the point of spoken word poetry is to perform your poem, the final step of writing a spoken word poem is performing it. When you perform your poem, it is important to do so in your own individual manner and style. You can mind your own performance style by practicing different wants that you feel comfortable expressing yourself. Before you perform in front of anyone, or a live audience, remember to rehearse your poem several times until you begin to feel more comfortable doing so.

    5 Tips for Writing Spoken Word Poetry

    Tip 1: Use Concrete Language

    Spoken word poetry should incorporate certain words and phrases that can create vivid images, sounds, actions, and other feelings and sensations in your readers. If you spoken poetry is strong and rich with imagery, your audience will be able to feel, smell, and taste along with your poem. A good spoken word poetry is just like reading a good book.

    Tip 2: Use Repetition

    In any type of poetry, repetition is a simple, yet powerful poetic device. The repetition of a phrase or imagine will help to extend that particular thought or image beyond its original meaning. This can help the writer get a point across or exaggerate a point that they want to make.

    Tip 3: Incorporate Rhyme

    The use of rhyming in your poem can add to your performance and make it more entertaining and fun to follow for your audience. Use elements of surprise and moderation when incorporating rhyme into your spoken word poetry.

    Every poet’s poem will be unique, and they will also have their own unique perspective of the subject or topic that they choose to write and speak about. It is essential that a spoken word poem is able to capture the feelings that the poet has and covey them to their audience and the rest of the world. Be sure that your poem incorporates a certain attitude or feeling to your audience.

    As a poet or write, you can portray anyone and any feelings that you want to in your poetry. For example, you choose to write your poem in the voice of someone else, or take on the opinion of another person that might be different from your own. Be creative and have fun with the subject you choose.

    Tips For Performing Spoken Word Poetry

    • How to create a book of your original poetryPosture: Be sure to stand up straight with your shoulders back, chin up, and head high. Look confident and assertive.
    • Eye Contact: Make eye contact with your audience, and do not star at the floor, your paper, or in one particular spot the entire time.
    • Project: Speak loudly and clearly enough to ensure that your entire audience can hear your voice.
    • Enunciate: Do not mumble.
    • Facial Expressions: Use facial expressions when you are performing spoken word poetry. This will help your audience get an idea of a point you want to get at or your emotions that are involved with your words.

    Popular Spoken Word Poems

    1. Buddy Wakefield — “Convenience Stores”
    2. Kate Tempest — “Line in the Sand”
    3. LKJ — “Inglan Is a Bitch”
    4. Dizraeli — “Maria”
    5. TJ Dema — “Neon Poem”
    6. Toby T — “Tomorrow”
    7. Andrea Gibson and Katie Wirsing
    8. Shane Koyczan – “To This Day”

    Speak Your Mind

    Spoken word poetry can be used to give a person a voice that they can use to express their ideas, emotions, and beliefs on a wide variety of things. Poetry is real, so take the above steps and let your authenticity shine. For tips on learning, memorizing, and performing poetry, enroll in this memorization course taught by a professional language learning author and film studies professor.

    Do you want to learn how to write poetry or how to improve as a poet? Would you like step-by-step advice on how to get poetry ideas and turn them into poems?

    You’re in the right place! Find answers to these questions:

    • “What should I write poems about?”
    • “How should I decide the right form for my poem?”
    • “What are common mistakes that new poets make, and how can I avoid them?”
    • “How do I write free verse/blank verse/sonnets/haikus etc.?”

    How to Write Poetry – Table of Contents

    Definition of Poetry. What is poetry, and how is it different from other types of writing? Here is CWN’s take on these questions.

    Poem Structure. How should a poem be divided into lines? (“At random” is the wrong answer to this question!) Here you’ll find some better ideas about choosing the right structure for your poem.

    Poetry Meter. What poetic meter is, and why you should care. An easy-to-understand guide to the rhythmic side of poetry.

    Rhyme Schemes. Rhyme is an important tool in your poetry toolbox. Why do some poets intentionally choose rhymes that aren’t exact? What’s the rhyme scheme of a limerick? Find out here!

    How to Write a Poem – Poetry Techniques 1. A step-by-step guide on how to write poetry. Advice on what to write about, how to get started, and choosing the right words.

    How to Write a Poem – Poetry Techniques 2. Advice on how to write well about abstractions such as Love and Death, how to choose a form for your poem, and a checklist to improve your poetry writing.

    How to Write Poems – Poetry Techniques 3. Can you guess the most common problems which damage the work of new poets? Find out how to write poetry without falling into these traps.

    Types of Poems – How to Write a Sonnet. A clear explanation of the sonnet form, plus poem starters for writing your own sonnet.

    Types of Poems – How to Write: Acrostic Poems, Blank Verse, Sestinas. Explanations of these poem types with ideas for trying them yourself. Download a free poetry tool to help you write sestinas.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Poem Types – How to Write a Narrative Poem or Ballad.. Explanations and examples of narrative poetry. Advice on writing your own narrative poem or ballad and poetry prompts to get you started.

    Poem Types – How to Write a Limerick. Limericks are a lot of fun to read and write. They don’t have to be dirty — that’s up to you. Get started here.

    Poem Types – How to Write a Haiku. Haiku is a Japanese poetry form which captures a moment in just a few words. Learn how to preserve your own insights and memories by writing haiku.

    Poem Types – Found Poetry. Writing found poetry is a kind of treasure hunt. Learn to discover poetic material in surprising places and turn it into poems.

    Interview: Michael Klam on Poetry Slams. Poet, teacher, and translator Michael Klam spoke to us about poetry slams, performance poetry, and literary translation.

    Interview: Karl Elder on Language Poetry. Karl Elder offers his view on the limitations of language poetry and the “aesthetic of chance.”

    Interview: Jessie Carty on Narrative Poems. Jessie Carty talks about her poetic influences and her experience as the editor of a literary magazine.

    Online Writing Course – Essentials of Poetry Writing. In this 8-week course, you’ll learn techniques for writing powerful poems.

    Feedback on Our Courses

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    How to create a book of your original poetry

    There are many sites you can use to publish your poetry online to help you find more readers.

    It is much easier than finding a traditional poetry publisher and going through a lengthy submission process.

    You can submit your work and have your poem published very quickly with the following poetry websites.

    Most of them make it easy to register, and then you can submit your poems.

    10 Free poetry submission sites

    If you love writing poetry, perhaps you are trying to find readers on social media. It can help, but Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are not ideal platforms for poetry.

    You might get better results by publishing where there are more passionate poetry readers.

    Take a look at the following poetry sites to post and publish poetry online. Some even offer the possibility to publish short stories as well.

    Make sure you read the submission guidelines carefully. Some allow simultaneous submissions, while some allow only one submission at a time.

    But after that, you will be ready to publish your poems online.

    1. All Poetry

    All Poetry has been around since 1999 and is a favorite with many poets.

    It claims to be the largest poetry writing group on the Internet and caters to poets from beginners to experts.

    It also gives you a handy 10 step guide on how to write better poetry.

    2. My Poetic Side

    If you want to publish your poems online and make new friends, My Poetic Side is well worth trying.

    It’s a little like a social network for poets. You will see that a lot of poems are posted every day, so the site is very active.

    In fact, according to Statshow, the site attracts nearly 90,000 users each month. So yes, it is popular.

    It also has a great blog with lots of informative posts about poets and poetry.

    One little extra benefit is that you can create a free ebook.

    3. Hello Poetry

    Another popular site is Hello Poetry.

    It is advertising-supported, but this helps it make it free for you to publish your poetry.

    One nice feature of the site is that you can search for poems by emotion.

    4. Poem Hunter

    The site design of Poem Hunter is hardly poetic, but it works very well. But it must be popular, judging by the number of new poems published each day.

    5. Post Poems

    This is another site that is a little light on for aesthetics, but you can publish poetry for free.

    However, when I checked Post Poems, there were 60 users online.

    For a poetry site, that’s not bad at all.

    6. Commaful

    With a clean Instagram-style layout and easy navigation, Commaful is an enjoyable site to visit.

    You need to add an image for each poem you submit.

    You might want to look at opening a free account with Canva to help you create eye-catching images.

    7. Writers Cafe

    You can post poetry, short stories, novels, scripts, and screenplays on Writers Cafe.

    It is one of the most well-established sites for writers, so it is probably an excellent choice to consider.

    8. Wattpad

    It is one of the most popular sites on the Internet. So it makes it a logical choice to publish your poems.

    There is a special section of Wattpad that is dedicated to poetry.

    Wattpad has a younger readership than many other sites, so it will depend on the type of audience you are targeting.

    9. Inkitt

    If you want an alternative to Wattpad, you might want to investigate Inkitt.

    It’s similar in many ways because it allows you to find new readers and gain feedback on your writing.

    Inkitt says it has over two million active users engaged on the site, so you have a very good chance to find readers.

    The site also has regular writing contests you can enter.

    You can still use other publishing platforms, so there are no restrictions.

    The only difference with this site is that you will probably need to publish a collection of your poems.

    10. Medium

    It’s the go-to platform for so many writers now to publish articles.

    But Medium is also becoming a popular publishing tool for poets.

    So much so that there is now a special tag for Poetry on Medium.

    Like many popular sites, though, you will need to add an eye-catching image to your poem.

    Self-publish your poetry

    Apart from using poetry sites to post your poems, you also have many free self-publishing options for your poetry.

    If you want to publish an ebook on Amazon, it really is the best option for free poetry publishing.

    However, if you want to self-publish a print book with Amazon, there is a small charge for delivering your proof copies.

    It’s not expensive, but you should check the price depending on where you live.

    The only trick with self-publishing poetry ebooks is to get your formatting right.

    You can read our short tutorial to help you format poetry for Kindle and Draft2Digital.

    Summary

    While poetry is not as popular as fiction, there are still a lot of readers out there.

    If poetry is your passion, there’s nothing to stop you from getting your poems published online for readers to find.

    It only takes a few minutes to register with the sites in the list above, and then you can publish poetry online.

    As far as I could see when I checked these sites, you don’t need to post your poems exclusively.

    You should be free to publish as many poems as you like on the sites I have listed in this article.

    But if you only want to use a couple of sites, I think My Poetic Side and Commaful look the most promising.

    Derek Haines

    A Cambridge CELTA English teacher and author with a passion for writing and all forms of publishing. My days are spent writing and blogging, as well as testing and taming new technology.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Words are everywhere. They are on our toothpaste tube when we rub the sand out of our eyes and brush the scum off our teeth in the wee hours of the morning. Words are on our cereal box, our t-shirt, and the signs that mark our neighborhood streets. Words are even in our heads, as we internally tag each object around us with its corresponding name.

    So if words are all over the place, why is it that we can often sit down to attempt writing- a poem or a story or an essay- and we can’t find the words? Well, it’s not that the words aren’t there. It’s just that for whatever reason… maybe we had a bad day, or we’re distracted by that upcoming test, or we’re excited about a birthday party… sometimes we aren’t feeling inspired.

    In order to combat that “writer’s block” that often hits even the best authors and poets, I have decided to show you how to create an Inspiration Scrapbook. Remember that words are everywhere, and often it’s as simple as a snip of the scissors to save a special word for later! Sometimes it’s not a word, but a photo or an event, that makes you want to write. You can save those little tidbits in your Inspiration Scrapbook as well, in the form of a ticket stub or a blue ribbon or a greeting card.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    What you’ll need

    • inexpensive scrap book (the one photographed is from a $1 bin at a big chain store)
    • scissors
    • glue, tape, or glue stick
    • pens, markers, crayons or pencils
    • magazines, greeting cards, photos, ticket stubs… anything that has inspired you!

    Getting started

    This is not a project that you would generally sit down and finish in one session. Just get it started! Add to it whenever something inspires you, but you just don’t have time to break out your poetry journal and write it down at the moment.

    1. Find an image or word in a magazine, greeting card, photograph (or anywhere) that makes you feel like writing a poem! For the page on the right, I started with the picture of my friend eating a s’more on a camping trip! Yum.
    2. Cut out the photo/word and glue or tape it onto a page in your scrapbook.
    3. Organize your scrapbook any way that feels comfortable for you. I like to place each main inspiration on a separate page. You see, the left side started with a cute puppy that looks like he might get into some trouble!
    4. Add on to each page as you see words or photos that go along with your main inspiration. I got a valentine that had the word “sweet” on it. When I was done with the card, I cut out the word and put it in my scrapbook alongside the s’more photo. You can also add stickers and hand-written words in marker, pen, or colored pencil. It’s your inspiration, so make it unique!
    5. Write your poem. When you want to sit down and write a poem in your Poetry Journal , open up your Inspiration Scrapbook to a page that seems full of fantastic ideas. Translate and transfer: That means, translate the pictures into words, and then write all the words down in your Poetry Journal. Put them together into a poem.

    Here is the poem I wrote from the page of sweets. Can you find the pictures in the poem?

    Sweet Tooth
    Gooey, crunchy, sweet.
    I’ll chomp down any sugary treat.

    Dum-dums, cocoa, cake, and s’mores,
    All I say is, “Give me more!”

    But now my sweet tooth’s really sore.

    Remember, you don’t have to use all of the images and words from your scrapbook in your poem. Can you find which ones I left out?

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Keep your scrapbook and your journal with you, and add to them as much as you can. If something inspires you when you have time to open your journal and write, do it! But if you think, “This is a really cool word or picture,” or, “I feel so proud of this blue ribbon,” and you don’t have time to write about it, put it in your scrapbook for when you do. You’ll never be at a loss for words.

    If you’re new to working with poetry publishers, and you’d like to publish a book of your own, you need to know your options.

    Different poetry publishers are looking for different styles and flavors of poetry.

    If you write rhyming couplets, you probably won’t get the best results from a press that has only published free verse.

    And if you don’t like the poetry a press has published, chances are, they’re not the press for you.

    So, where do you find the best poetry publishers for your book?

    Poetry Publishers You Should Consider

    For this post, we’ve curated a list of 33 legit poetry publishers who will give your book its best chance on the market.

    Not all of them have a budget for advance payments, but they may do more to get your book noticed — which increases the likelihood of sales (i.e., royalty payments).

    For each of the poetry publishing companies listed below, you’ll see some details that I hope will help you decide which ones to look at more closely.

    In case you’re ready to publish now, this post focuses on the poetry book publishers accepting submissions.

    • 33 Poetry Publishers You Should Consider
    • Poetry Publishers that Pay
    • Poetry Publishers Open to Submissions
      • 1. Autumn House Press
      • 2. Black Lawrence Press
      • 3. Black Mountain Press
      • 4. BlazeVOX Books
      • 5. City Lights Booksellers & Publishers
      • 6. Coach House Books
      • 7. Codhill Press
      • 8. Copper Canyon
      • 9. Counterpath
      • 10. Four Way Books
      • 11. Louisiana State University (LSU) Press
      • 12. Platypus Press (UK)
      • 13. Trio House Press (THP)
      • 14. Tupelo Press
      • 15. WordTech Communications
    • Christian Poetry Publishers
      • 16. Wipf & Stock Publishers
      • 17. Yorkshire Publishing
      • Publishing by Poetry Contest
      • 18. Alice James Books
      • 19. Anhinga Press:
      • 20. Cave Canem: A Home for Black Poetry
      • 21. Elixir Press
      • 22. Graywolf Press
      • 23. Kore Press
      • 24. Milkweed Editions
      • 25. Noemi Press
      • 26. Ohio University Press
      • 27. Orison Books
      • 28. Persea Books
      • 29. Sarabande Books
      • 30. Saturnalia Books
      • 31. Slope Editions
      • 32. Steel Toe Books
      • 33. Two Sylvias

    Poetry Publishers that Pay

    If you’ve spent hours creating a book of 30 or more poems you’re proud of, no one can blame you for focusing your time and energy on publishers that pay.

    This post would fail in its purpose, though, if it didn’t point out that many of the poetry publishers that once accepted submissions throughout the year now only accept them for their annual poetry prizes.

    Some of those who are still open to unsolicited submissions have made their submission window smaller and now charge a reading fee just to keep the business going.

    And after sifting through the webpages for over a hundred different poetry publishers and their contests, I found plenty that had stopped taking submissions — some temporarily, others for the foreseeable future.

    At least with a contest, they’re likely to earn more in entry fees than they end up spending for the winners’ awards.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    It doesn’t matter if you want to be an independently published author or a traditionally published author—submitting a manuscript that follows the industry-standard manuscript formatting rules is critically important for getting your work read.

    For writers wanting to be independent published authors, this process will cut down your costs when the time comes for manuscript assessment, proofreading, editing, and typesetting. The professionals that do this work will charge more if your manuscript format doesn’t adhere to industry standards, because that means they’ll need to re-format your manuscript before they can start their work.

    For authors going down the route of traditional publishing, correct manuscript format is also an important step—the agents and publishers you submit your writing to won’t even look at your manuscript if it’s not formatted according to the industry standard. They won’t spend time with an author that hasn’t done the necessary preparation. They get way too many submissions, and they’ll simply move on to the next one without giving your manuscript a second look.

    What is manuscript formatting?

    Manuscript formatting is the way in which the text of your book or novel is presented on the page. The same text could have a larger or smaller font; it could be set in Times New Roman, or Courier, or another font; it could be on a white page, or a cream page; the page size, or the size of the margins could vary; and so on. The words and sentences themselves haven’t changed, only how we present them—that’s formatting.

    When submitting your manuscript to agents, editors, and publishers, they expect your writing to be formatted in a specific way. This makes it easier for them to read through the tens and hundreds of submissions they get every week.

    Manuscripts that don’t follow these industry-standard formatting rules are much more likely to be discarded unread, because not only does it waste the reader’s time, but and it also suggests that the writer is an amateur. You don’t want that!

    How to format a book

    Luckily for you, correctly formatting your book manuscript can be summarized in just a few bullet points.

    Some of your recipients might have their own special rules that they’d like you to follow when formatting your manuscript. If they do, then you should of course follow their requirements. But if they just ask for “industry standard manuscript formatting,” then these are the rules you want to follow to the letter:

    Set a margin of 1 inch (2.5cm) on all four sides of your manuscript. This is usually already the default setting in Word, but double check on your computer to make sure.

    Align text to the left; the right hand side should remain ragged. (I.e., don’t set your text to be justified.)

    Use Times New Roman font, at 12 point size. Courier and Arial fonts may also be acceptable, but to be safe stick with Times New Roman unless otherwise specified.

    Black text on a white background only. Don’t get creative with colors.

    Indent each paragraph by half an inch (1.25cm). Don’t do this by hitting the tab key; instead, set indentation in Word using the Format → Paragraph → Section menu, or see this tutorial.

    Double space lines, with no extra space between paragraphs.

    Single space between sentences, after periods.

    Use a blank line to indicate scene breaks, and center a hash mark (#) in the middle of the blank line.

    Create a header in the top right corner by using your last name, then selecting a keyword from your manuscript, followed by the page number. For example, Hart – Manuscript – 1 . You can add headers and page numbers in Word automatically.

    Begin chapters on new pages. Center the chapter title, even if it’s only Chapter One, about one-third of the way down the page. Skip a couple of lines and begin the text of the chapter.

    At the end of the manuscript, center a hash mark (#) one double-spaced blank line after the last line. Or, simply write The End . This will reassure the reader that pages aren’t accidentally missing.

    Use italics when necessary, but never underline in novel manuscripts.

    Need feedback on your manuscript?

    Join our community of hundreds of thousands of writers and get feedback and beta reads for your novel!

    Title page format for manuscripts

    Your manuscript should always include a title page. It should follow the same formatting conventions as the body text, including margins and font size. It should include:

    Your contact details at the upper left of the title page, formatted in the same font and size as the manuscript text.

    The approximate word count, to the nearest hundred, at the upper right of the title page.

    The name of the novel, about a third of the way down the title page and centered.

    Your name just below the novel’s title, preceded by the word by .

    An example of correct manuscript formatting

    A well-formatted titlepage looks like this:

    Body text that follows correct manuscript formatting looks like this:

    If you’ve followed all of these bullet points, then congratulations! You now have a manuscript formatted to the industry standard, and it’s ready to be sent to agents, editors, and publishers.

    Things to do before you send in your manuscript

    Check with the recipient to make sure they don’t have any special formatting requirements that you should follow before sending it in.

    Keep an exact copy of the manuscript file you sent in, backed up separately from your master document. For example, if your master manuscript file is named my-novel.docx , keep an exact copy of the file you submitted named my-novel-penguin-submission-feb-3-2022.docx . It’s important to track exactly what text you submitted to which recipient, in case you make changes to your master manuscript later.

    Kelly Hart is a proofreading contractor for Book Cover Cafe and has been a slush reader for Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine. She is completing her Masters in Writing at Swinburne University of Technology. You can find and contact Kelly on Scribophile.

    If you’re serious about improving your writing, sign up and join thousands of other talented writers in our busy workshop!

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    Terms of Service. Turkey Sandwich Industries © 2022. Original prose and poetry writings posted to Scribophile are © their respective authors.

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    1. Home
    2. Poetry

    Today’s top voted Poetry

    Vanity is good Better than ever That is why Narcissus becomes a flower He loves himself He was said to be really handsome And his story is the same, utterly awesome He f.

    Favorite Quote:
    “You can’t ask other people to believe you and vote for you if you don’t back yourself.”
    -Jacinda Ardern-

    “If I can make someone’s day brighter, happier, better, that makes me happier.”
    -Ava Max-

    “A writer must never be short of ideas.”
    -Gabriel Agreste- (Fictional character- Miraculous)

    “A Bridge Has Two Sides.”
    -Elsa- (Fictional character- Frozen)

    “I knew who I was as a girl but I had to find who I was as a woman.”
    -Delta Goodrem-

    Today’s most discussed Poetry

    Vanity is good Better than ever That is why Narcissus becomes a flower He loves himself He was said to be really handsome And his story is the same, utterly awesome He f.

    Favorite Quote:
    “You can’t ask other people to believe you and vote for you if you don’t back yourself.”
    -Jacinda Ardern-

    “If I can make someone’s day brighter, happier, better, that makes me happier.”
    -Ava Max-

    “A writer must never be short of ideas.”
    -Gabriel Agreste- (Fictional character- Miraculous)

    “A Bridge Has Two Sides.”
    -Elsa- (Fictional character- Frozen)

    “I knew who I was as a girl but I had to find who I was as a woman.”
    -Delta Goodrem-

    Favorite Quote:
    You can’t go back and change the beginning, but you can start where you are and change the ending .
    – Anonymous

    Favorite Quote:
    “You can’t ask other people to believe you and vote for you if you don’t back yourself.”
    -Jacinda Ardern-

    “If I can make someone’s day brighter, happier, better, that makes me happier.”
    -Ava Max-

    “A writer must never be short of ideas.”
    -Gabriel Agreste- (Fictional character- Miraculous)

    “A Bridge Has Two Sides.”
    -Elsa- (Fictional character- Frozen)

    “I knew who I was as a girl but I had to find who I was as a woman.”
    -Delta Goodrem-

    Most recently submitted Poetry

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    Since there are hundreds of publications in the US and abroad that publish poetry, finding the perfect fit for your verses may seem a bit overwhelming. If you’ve been writing and submitting for a while now, then you already have a list of publications on-hand. If you’re yet to publish your first poem or collection of poems, then you’ll want to start conducting targeted market research.

    While you may want to aim for your favorite professional-level publication, sometimes it may take a while to get into its print – or cyber – pages. It’s important to remain positive and continue to focus on your craft by attending workshops, reading articles, creating – or joining – a critique group, and so forth.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    The 15 Top Marketplaces to Publish Your Poetry

    5 Markets for Mainstream Literary Poetry

    • Kenyon Review
    • Ploughshares
    • Poets & Writers
    • Poetry Magazine
    • Rattle

    5 Markets for Minimalist Poetry

    • Acorn
    • Frogpond
    • Modern Haiku
    • The Heron’s Nest
    • The World Haiku Review

    5 Markets for Science and Speculative Fiction Poetry

    • Asimov’s
    • Illumen
    • Star*Line
    • Strange Horizons
    • The Pedestal Magazine

    What to Do Before Submitting

    In general, many submission guidelines encourage you to send three-to-five poems at a time. So, once you have a completed file of poems to submit, here are just a few questions to ask before submitting your work:

    • Do you know the type of poetry this publication tends to publish?
    • Are you familiar with the editors’ likes, dislikes, and pet peeves?
    • Have you checked, double- checked, and triple-checked the guidelines and followed them to the letter?
    • Have you proofed and edited your poems? Read them out loud?
    • Have you workshopped the poems, and do they represent your “best” work?

    If you responded, “yes,” to the questions above, then submit your poems with a nice cover letter, when requested, and be sure to note the guidelines for these as well.

    Keeping Track of Your Submissions

    One way to maintain awareness of your progress and success is to create a submissions log. If you’re a prolific poet that submits work on a weekly basis, for example, then a log is a valuable tool. If you’re new to being published, then you have a visual and interactive display to note the cumulative results of your actions.

    Here are just a few reasons why it’s a good to keep track:

    • You are aware of which poems are being considered and by whom.
    • You know when they’ve been submitted, which is particularly important when noting how long you need to wait before querying.
    • You don’t inadvertently simsub (i.e., submit simultaneous submissions).
    • You don’t resubmit a revised poem(s) to a publication that indicates not to do this unless invited.
    • You will be able to note which publications you’ve considered for your work, thus determining if it’s a good market fit.

    While some people may use Excel or another type of software, I create tables in a Word doc. Here are the categories in my current submissions log:

    • Date submitted
    • Publication and poem titles
    • Date accepted and specific issue
    • Date rejected
    • Payment amount

    Since I set up my tables to allow for additional information, I also make note of the editors’ names, website URLs, and other information, such as editor comments, which are always appreciated. In addition to my regular submissions log, I also have a month-to-month table where I track the total number of submissions, rejections, and payment.

    How to create a book of your original poetry

    Visualize Success

    One of my favorite motivational sayings is this: “What we focus on, grows.” I keep this in mind when writing, and yes, when opening my email to an acceptance or thank-you-for-submitting-but-it’s-not-a-good-fit-for-us letter. It’s also important to stay focused when, or if, those rejection notes seem to pile up. One of my early writing mentors told me that while I may be a good writer, it would be my dedication to craft and persistence that would make a significant difference. He was right.

    Here’s to your success as a poet or with any other form of writing in which you choose to engage.