How to cover your face with a bandana

This article was co-authored by wikiHow staff writer, Hunter Rising. Hunter Rising is a wikiHow Staff Writer based in Los Angeles. He has more than three years of experience writing for and working with wikiHow. Hunter holds a BFA in Entertainment Design from the University of Wisconsin – Stout and a Minor in English Writing.

There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

The wikiHow Video Team also followed the article’s instructions and verified that they work.

This article has been viewed 24,963 times.

We know that the COVID-19 pandemic is a scary and stressful time, so you’re probably doing everything you can to stay safe. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends wearing a mask when you’re in public so you can avoid spreading or catching the virus. [1] X Trustworthy Source World Health Organization Health information and news provided by the World Health Organization Go to source Even though medical-grade N95 masks offer you the best protection, a bandana makes a stylish alternative if you don’t have one. We’ll walk the easiest and most effective ways to wear your bandana so you keep yourself and others safe.
Warning: Cloth masks are ineffective in preventing the spread of more infectious variants of COVID-19, like Delta and Omicron. Use a medical-grade mask to limit the spread and risk of infection from the current dominant variants of the coronavirus. [2] X Trustworthy Source Cleveland Clinic Educational website from one of the world’s leading hospitals Go to source

Style experts weigh in on the go-to, give-zero-f**ks pandemic trend for stylish men.

How to cover your face with a bandana

How to cover your face with a bandana

It might be simple square of fabric cloth, but the bandana has had a major impact on American culture. Cowboys wore them for dust protection, musicians wore them for badass flair, and even the LGBTQ+ community wore them as a secret code language. Every man might own a necktie, but few choose to wear them outside formal occasions. The bandana’s appeal has always been niche, but these characters in society openly embraced the cloth, giving it far greater significance.

Now, in a pandemic world of uncertainty, the bandana has had this major resurgence as a face covering for the masses, even though it’s been recently proven to be less effective than a face mask. But there’s much more to the trend. From the Instagram accounts of high-profile tastemakers like Drake, to the Spring/ Summer 2020 runway shows of some of the biggest names in fashion, including Dolce & Gabana, Versace, and Hermes; the bandana is truly everywhere (and not just for covering one’s face). So, what’s it all about?

“The bandana is a great accessory piece, but also it’s functional; you can throw it in your back pocket and you can also use it as a styling piece,” says Whitney Michel, Creative Director of Michel Men, an accessories line that’s been worn by the stylish leading men of Hollywood, including Pierce Brosnan and Michael Caine. “When I came to the idea of creating bandanas, I initially made them with cotton, but I wanted to elevate it—how can you make it feel softer, how can you move past that paisley version of the old school American bandana? That’s when I started diving into soft silks and placing monograms on it so that it still feels masculine—whatever ‘masculine’ means now—but also has a bit ore personality to it.”

Bandanas have come a long way since the paisley-printed cotton classic. Cool geometric designs add a graphic twist to your simple white tees, while a silky texture adds an elevated accent to your ordinary suit for standout style. And yes, men can—and should—wear silk. The rich fabric has been embraced by a number of trend-setting designers for it’s louche charm, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

“Western-style has been a recurring trend in the last few years, but I do feel it’s at its peak at the moment—it’s everywhere and bandanas compliment that style and aesthetic perfectly,” says style influencer Christian Bendek who’s embraced the trend. “I usually add it on as an accessory. Either I adjust it to my head as a face cover and let it hang on my neck, or I fold it and wrap it around my neck, kind of like a necklace. I’ve been doing both a lot lately and it’s great to layer with jewelry, too.”

How to cover your face with a bandana

The small-yet-mighty piece of cloth allows men to accessorize in a new, fresh way to showcase more of their personality, beyond the limitations of a minimalist watch or necklace.

With only a bandana, coffee filter, rubber bands and scissors, you can create a DIY face cover. Find easy step-by-step instructions below for how to make a no-sew bandana face cover, or follow along with this video.

Shop tools & materials you’ll need:

How to cover your face with a bandana

How to cover your face with a bandana

How to cover your face with a bandana

How to cover your face with a bandana

Tools & materials you’ll need:

  • Bandana (or a 20” x 20” square cotton cloth)
  • 2 rubber bands or hair ties
  • Scissors

Also, make sure you’ve got a coffee filter.

Here’s how to make it:

How to cover your face with a bandana

Fold the coffee filter in half so that it makes a semi-circle shape. Then, fold the bandana in half horizontally.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Place the coffee filter in the middle of the bandana, and fold the bandana into thirds. First, fold the bottom up.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Next, fold the top down.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Place two rubber bands around the ends of the bandana, about 6” apart.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Fold the ends of the bandana over the rubber bands towards the center and tuck the ends together.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Wear your face cover by placing the rubber bands behind your ears.

Templates referenced above follow similar medical materials that are recommended for these items. Medical professionals receiving these items will decide how best to use them.

Additional Videos

According to the CDC’s new guidelines, homemade cloth face coverings should be worn in public, especially when you’re going to the grocery store or pharmacy, to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. But because of shortages of FDA-approved surgical masks and N95 respirators, which should be reserved for frontline workers, you’ll want to make your own DIY face mask. Don’t worry, it’s much easier than you might think. In fact, the CDC has recommended a few different ways to craft your own cloth face covering, including a bandana face mask that takes less than a minute to assemble. All you need is a 20-by-20-inch cotton bandana or a tightly woven piece of cotton, two hair ties (or rubber bands), and a coffee filter. Then, make a few folds, following the instructions below or the video above. Wear your bandana face mask every time you head to the grocery store—and don’t forget about physical distancing!—to help slow the spread of the virus.

Choosing a Fabric

The CDC suggests using a tightly woven, yet breathable material for your homemade face mask. In the tutorial for a sewn face mask, the agency writes, “Use tightly woven cotton, such as quilting fabric or cotton sheets. T-shirt fabric will work in a pinch.” They also include instructions for using a cotton T-shirt or a cotton bandana. Using multiple layers of fabric and adding a filter (such as a coffee filter or HEPA vacuum filter) will also help.

Make It Comfortable

Ideally, the bandana face mask should fit snugly against your face, so there are no gaps between your face and the mask. But, you also want it to be comfortable so that you won’t be tempted to touch or readjust the mask. If you do touch the front of the mask, wash your hands with hand sanitizer or soap and water.

How to Remove a Face Mask

Take off the mask by the hair ties or rubber bands, rather than touching the front of the bandana.

How to Wash a Cloth Face Mask

Throw away the coffee filter layer after each use, then toss the bandana or fabric in the washing machine. Wash with hot water and detergent, then dry thoroughly.

How to Make a Bandana Face Mask

Gather Your Supplies:

  • Bandana or cotton fabric, approximately 20-by-20 inches
  • Coffee filter (or piece of HEPA vacuum filter)
  • 2 hair ties (or rubber bands or pieces of elastic)

Follow These Steps (from the CDC):

1. Fold the bandana in half widthwise.

2. Cut a piece of coffee filter (approximately 3-by-6 inches), and place in the center of the folded bandana.

3. Fold the top third of the bandana down, then fold the bottom third of the bandana up.

4. Slide the hair ties onto either side of the folded fabric so they are about 6 inches apart.

5. Fold the ends in towards the center, tucking them in if you want.

6. To put on the mask, loop the hair ties over your ears. Adjust the mask to make sure it covers your nose and mouth completely.

Until recently, the World Health Organization said the only people who needed to wear masks during the coronavirus pandemic were caretakers of a person suspected of having COVID-19, or those who are coughing or sneezing.

But with each passing day, we’re advised to take more and more precautions ― and now the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises everyone to wear face masks in public, even for those of us who don’t display symptoms or know of exposure to an infected person.

In light of the shortage of face masks for health care workers, people wearing masks for personal use need to stop buying masks that professionals need to stay safe.

For most people, the best solution is to make our own. We’ve shared tutorials on how to sew a face mask that’s effective against the coronavirus, as well as versions that require absolutely no sewing whatsoever.

But we may have just found the easiest DIY face mask of all ― the bandana face mask. All it requires is a bandana and two rubber bands. No sewing or glue required.

Don’t have a bandana? No problem. The standard size of a bandana is 22 inches square, or 56 square centimeters, so you can find a piece of cotton fabric that has a similar weight. An old bedsheet, a pillowcase, a T-shirt, pajamas or a dress shirt you don’t wear anymore will do just fine.

Don’t have rubber bands? Stretchy hair ties (the kind you secure a ponytail with) will do the trick.

This YouTube tutorial from Kristin Omdahl is the only one you’ll need. Just keep in mind when fitting your mask that the edges should fit snuggly against your skin.

If for some reason your video player isn’t working, or you’d rather see the directions laid out in step-by-step photos, check out this similar tutorial from Japanese Creations.

The CDC recommends people wear cloth face coverings in public.

As scientists continue to study the behavior of the new coronavirus across the U.S., the official guidelines around how we can best protect ourselves are subject to change. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recent studies have shown that a significant number of people test positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, despite showing no symptoms. Plus, it’s also possible to transmit the virus to other people before you show symptoms.

To help stop the spread of the disease, the CDC is now recommending that people wear cloth face coverings when they’re out in public and find it difficult to maintain other social distancing measures, such as when shopping for groceries. But in doing this, it’s important not to use FDA-approved surgical masks and N95 respirators — these should be reserved for frontline workers.

Which means it’s time to get crafty and make your own face covering.

The easiest option is the no-sew bandana face mask, which takes less than a minute to put together. All you need is a 20-inch-by-20-inch cotton bandanna (or any other tightly woven but breathable piece of cotton of similar dimensions), two hair ties or rubber bands, scissors and a coffee filter.

Here are the instructions provided by the CDC:

1. Fold the bandana in half (widthwise).

2. Cut the coffee filter in half (widthwise).

3. Place the coffee filter in the center of the folded bandana.

3. Fold the top third of the bandana down, then fold the bottom third of the bandana up.

4. Slide the hair ties onto either side of the folded fabric until they are about 6 inches apart.

5. Fold the ends in towards the center and tuck them in.

6. To put on the mask, loop the hair ties over your ears. Adjust the mask as necessary to ensure your nose and mouth are completely covered. The CDC says it should fit snugly, with no gaps between your skin and the mask.

A few people have posted handy how-to videos to YouTube, like this one:

To take off your face mask, avoid touching the front of the bandana; get into the habit of using the hair ties to remove it from your face.

It’s also important to wash your face mask after each use. Throw away the coffee filter layer, then machine-wash the fabric with hot water and detergent and let it dry thoroughly before you use it again.

Don’t forget that it’s crucial to continue to practice all other social distancing measures recommended by the CDC. In other words, stay home as much as possible, maintain a distance of six feet between yourself and other people when you’re out in public, and avoid close contact with people who are sick.

By Stephanie Osmanski Parade

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The coronavirus outbreak is a time for self-isolation, home-schooling, working from home, and perhaps most importantly, a time to get crafty. With most non-essential stores closed, Amazon packages and other delivery services backed up, and a government recommendation to stay inside until April 15, we need to work with what we already got.

As you can guess, that has people getting pretty crafty, especially when it comes to making masks that prevent the spread of COVID-19. There’s been a massive N95 mask shortage since coronavirus first hit, and health professionals are getting first dibs on the masks that do become available.

And things are changing every day. Originally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended not to wear face masks unless you were sick. Now, as of a few days ago, new evidence emerged that even cloth face masks are better than nothing, as asymptomatic people can spread the virus unknowingly. According to the CDC, the current recommendation is “wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.”

Additionally, the “CDC is [also] advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.”

So, if you want the added protection that a face mask can offer, there are a few DIY options that can work. One option is sewing a face mask out of fabric, but if you don’t consider yourself a regular Susie Homemaker who’s a pro at the sewing machine, here are two no-sew options that are easier to make and just as efficient as sewn masks.

How to make a no-sew mask with a scarf

The first at-home, new-sew coronavirus mask option utilizes a scarf as the main material. The scarf should be 18 inches by 18 inches (you can cut if you have one that is bigger than that), and two hair ties —that’s it!

Gather up your materials and start by laying the scarf facedown on a flat surface. Fold the top half down to the midline, then fold the bottom half up to the midline, too. Flip it over, seams facing down. Fold the top half to the midline again so that the seams are down, then fold the bottom half up to the midline, too. Flip it over again, so the seams are facing up.

Loop the hair ties over each end, then fold the outer sides to the middle. Flip it over and loop the hair ties over each of your ears. The mask should cover your mouth and nose entirely.

How to make a no-sew mask with a bandana

Even celebrities are getting on the make-your-own-mask trend. Just ask Colin Hanks, whose father Tom Hanks was diagnosed with coronavirus back in March. Colin Hanks posted a bandana or hankerchief mask tutorial on his Instagram.

Until recently, the World Health Organization said the only people who needed to wear masks during the coronavirus pandemic were caretakers of a person suspected of having COVID-19, or those who are coughing or sneezing.

But with each passing day, we’re advised to take more and more precautions ― and now the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises everyone to wear face masks in public, even for those of us who don’t display symptoms or know of exposure to an infected person.

In light of the shortage of face masks for health care workers, people wearing masks for personal use need to stop buying masks that professionals need to stay safe.

For most people, the best solution is to make our own. We’ve shared tutorials on how to sew a face mask that’s effective against the coronavirus, as well as versions that require absolutely no sewing whatsoever.

But we may have just found the easiest DIY face mask of all ― the bandana face mask. All it requires is a bandana and two rubber bands. No sewing or glue required.

Don’t have a bandana? No problem. The standard size of a bandana is 22 inches square, or 56 square centimeters, so you can find a piece of cotton fabric that has a similar weight. An old bedsheet, a pillowcase, a T-shirt, pajamas or a dress shirt you don’t wear anymore will do just fine.

Don’t have rubber bands? Stretchy hair ties (the kind you secure a ponytail with) will do the trick.

This YouTube tutorial from Kristin Omdahl is the only one you’ll need. Just keep in mind when fitting your mask that the edges should fit snuggly against your skin.

If for some reason your video player isn’t working, or you’d rather see the directions laid out in step-by-step photos, check out this similar tutorial from Japanese Creations.

With only a bandana, coffee filter, rubber bands and scissors, you can create a DIY face cover. Find easy step-by-step instructions below for how to make a no-sew bandana face cover, or follow along with this video.

Shop tools & materials you’ll need:

How to cover your face with a bandana

How to cover your face with a bandana

Tools & materials you’ll need:

  • 2 rubber bands or hair ties
  • Scissors

Also, make sure you’ve got a bandana (or a 50.8 cm x 50.8 cm square cotton cloth) and a coffee filter.

Here’s how to make it:

How to cover your face with a bandana

Fold the coffee filter in half so that it makes a semi-circle shape. Then, fold the bandana in half horizontally.

Place the coffee filter in the middle of the bandana, and fold the bandana into thirds. First, fold the bottom up.

Next, fold the top down.

Place two rubber bands around the ends of the bandana, about 15 cm apart.

Fold the ends of the bandana over the rubber bands towards the center and tuck the ends together.

Wear your face cover by placing the rubber bands behind your ears.

Templates referenced above follow similar medical materials that are recommended for these items. Medical professionals receiving these items will decide how best to use them.

Until recently, the World Health Organization said the only people who needed to wear masks during the coronavirus pandemic were caretakers of a person suspected of having COVID-19, or those who are coughing or sneezing.

But with each passing day, we’re advised to take more and more precautions ― and now the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises everyone to wear face masks in public, even for those of us who don’t display symptoms or know of exposure to an infected person.

In light of the shortage of face masks for health care workers, people wearing masks for personal use need to stop buying masks that professionals need to stay safe.

For most people, the best solution is to make our own. We’ve shared tutorials on how to sew a face mask that’s effective against the coronavirus, as well as versions that require absolutely no sewing whatsoever.

But we may have just found the easiest DIY face mask of all ― the bandana face mask. All it requires is a bandana and two rubber bands. No sewing or glue required.

Don’t have a bandana? No problem. The standard size of a bandana is 22 inches square, or 56 square centimeters, so you can find a piece of cotton fabric that has a similar weight. An old bedsheet, a pillowcase, a T-shirt, pajamas or a dress shirt you don’t wear anymore will do just fine.

Don’t have rubber bands? Stretchy hair ties (the kind you secure a ponytail with) will do the trick.

This YouTube tutorial from Kristin Omdahl is the only one you’ll need. Just keep in mind when fitting your mask that the edges should fit snuggly against your skin.

If for some reason your video player isn’t working, or you’d rather see the directions laid out in step-by-step photos, check out this similar tutorial from Japanese Creations.

The CDC now recommends all citizens wear a face covering in public.

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The CDC now recommends all citizens wear a face covering in public.

As the novel coronavirus continues to spread, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) officially recommends that all citizens — and not just sick individuals — wear cloth face masks in public. The new recommendation, announced in a statement posted to the CDC’s website on April 3, provides much-needed clarification on previously differing stances on the efficacy of face coverings.

Though social distancing and quarantine remain crucial to fighting the spread of COVID-19, the CDC reports that face masks provide an additional degree of protection as an estimated 25 percent of infected individuals don’t show symptoms — are “asymptomatic” — and may unwittingly spread the virus to others. Wearing a cloth face mask while grocery shopping and on other essential outings also helps prevent “pre-symptomatic” individuals in the beginning stages of infection from spreading it to others.

Citizens should avoid purchasing medical-grade surgical masks or N95 respirators, as supplies for our front-line healthcare workers are dangerously low. “Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders,” the CDC sanctions. Instead, you can fashion your own cloth, non-medical face mask using supplies likely already in your home — no sewing required.

Watch the video above and scroll down for a step-by-step tutorial on how to make your own no-sew cloth face mask.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Supplies

  • 1 bandana or piece of tightly woven cotton cloth, approximately 20” x 20”
  • 2 rubber bands or hair ties
  • 1 cone coffee filter and scissors (optional)

Instructions

How to cover your face with a bandana

1. Fold the top edge of the bandana down and the bottom edge up so that both sides meet in the middle.

2. Flip the folded bandana over.

How to cover your face with a bandana

3. Ensure the bandana is oriented horizontally. Repeat Step 1, folding the top edge of the bandana down and the bottom edge up so that both sides meet in the middle.

4. Loop a rubber band or hair tie around the left and right sides (short sides) of the bandana so that it resembles a candy wrapper.

How to cover your face with a bandana

5. Flip the bandana over and fold the excess fabric on the left and right sides (beyond the hair ties) to the middle.

6. To wear the mask, place the rubber bands or hair ties around each ear. The mask should completely your nose and mouth. If it doesn’t, you can adjust the width of your mask by experimenting with the placement of your rubber bands or hair ties, leaving more or less excess fabric, on the left and right sides depending on your preference.

7. To add a coffee filter as additional protection, cut the filter in half horizontally. Place the top half of the filter in the center of the bandana in between Steps 2 and 3.

Safety Recommendations

To safely wear your face mask, make sure to wash and dry it about once a week at the highest temperature the fabric will tolerate. In addition, avoid removing your mask by the mouth area. Instead, grab it by the straps and wash your hands after touching it. Lastly, do not put a face masks on children under 2 years old, anyone who has difficulty breathing or individuals unable to remove the mask themselves.

Though it’s tempting to simply tie a scarf or bandana around your face, it does not provide adequate protection — a mask created using the method above, or one similar, has multiple layers and covers your face more tightly.

In addition to wearing a cloth face mask, the CDC still recommends washing your hands regularly (or using hand sanitizer in a pinch), as well as covering your face with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when you cough. As always, avoid touching your face and of course, stay at home and practice social distancing.

How to cover your face with a bandana

I found a great DIY cloth facemask by Kristen Omdahl on Youtube where she is using a bandana to make a barrier facemask. Luckily bandanas are something I have a lot of because I was recently making bandana pillow covers and ordered way more bandanas than I actually needed. Not only will this mask work with bandanas, but it will also work with scarves of any kind. Not only is it a no-sew mask but it doesn’t require any fabric glue either, all you need are 2 rubber bands to hold this together. I know there are many barrier mask tutorials on Youtube that require a sewing machine, but many people do not have a sewing machine and you still want a sturdy barrier mask to wear alone or to put over another disposable paper mask for extra protection. There are many reasons to choose a cloth mask and as a rule, they are my preference because you can sterilize them in your wash with many natural substances such as distilled white vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, or Clorox Bleach along with your favorite laundry soap. I put a couple of drops of essential oil on my cloth facemask, to add a bit more of a barrier between my air passages and dangerous contaminants. The other thing I love about this cloth mask is that there is a layer of cotton batting which really adds to the protective barrier layer. The materials are really simple and straightforward as well. However, the masks that you can make at home are not proven to protect against COVID 19 and I have only made them in a pinch to wear with another disposable mask. For in-depth information regarding how to protect yourself against COVID 19, please view this link from the CDC Website describing all safe practices during the COVID 19 outbreak.

Materials:

  • A Bandana
  • 2 Rubber Bands (or hair ties)

Directions:

In the video, you will learn to fold the bandana perfectly to make a mask shape.

How to cover your face with a bandanaThen you will attach rubber bands to each end and fold the remaining bits in creating this wonderfully simple mask.

How to cover your face with a bandana

This is the easiest mask tutorial yet, just love it! No sewing or gluing!

April 8, 2020 by Janice

You don’t need a sewing machine or any sewing supplies to create a cloth face covering like a bandana mask. You can make a no-sew cloth face mask with two elastic bands and a bandana, or any piece of cotton fabric such as a large square cut out of an old shirt.

It takes less than a minute to make this DIY no-sew bandana mask.

How to cover your face with a bandana

The CDC, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer as well as other government officials across the world agree that we are all safer if people wear face masks when out in public.

Since it is crucial that medical supplies are reserved for frontline healthcare workers, the general public must use cloth masks or other DIY face masks.

There are many different options for homemade face coverings.

The Easiest DIY No-Sew Face Mask

How to cover your face with a bandana

If you need a mask immediately and you have limited supplies, this instant face mask tutorial has you covered!

All the supplies you need are two elastic bands, regular rubber bands or hair ties will work, and a bandana or large piece of fabric from an old dress shirt or t-shirt.

If you don’t have hairbands or elastic bands, or you want a softer alternative to wrap around your ears, you can cut sections of a tube sock to make soft, knit “elastic” bands.

If you are cutting your fabric from a shirt, cut a piece around 18″ x 18″ The size does not need to be exact at all.

How to Make a DIY Bandana Face Mask Step by Step Instructions

Step 1

How to cover your face with a bandana

Open and lay your bandana or fabric on a flat surface. Then fold bandana in large folds, approximately five or six inches deep.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Place elastic bands on each end of folded bandana, with about an eight-inch space in the center, between the bands,

How to cover your face with a bandana

Turn ends in towards the center of the folded bandana and then place one end into the other, pocketing one end into the folds of the other.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Position elastic bands at the edges so they can wrap around your ears and hold the mask in place.

How to cover your face with a bandana

If You Can Sew, Make This DIY Face Mask

How to cover your face with a bandana

If you sew, we have a comprehensive DIY Cloth Face Mask Tutorial which includes a free downloadable face mask pattern and instructions. Hopefully, all you sewists out there will be able to sew masks for family, friends, and those in need.

If you want a mask without pleats, download our latest and most popular fitted face mask pattern.

Sewing one of these masks, in just the right size, is the best way to get a tight fitting cloth mask.

For those who don’t sew but want to have a high quality, washable cloth face mask, there are many sewists, like myself, who are sewing extra masks for others.

You can reach out on social media to local sewists or look on Etsy to find sewists who are selling their handmade masks. Buying masks from home sewists is a wonderful way to support fellow moms so they can earn some extra grocery money, as well as to cover the costs of the fabric and supplies for the masks they are making to donate to the frontline workers.

Protecting yourself and others is easier than you think.

Do your part to protect yourself and others during the coronavirus pandemic. Since the CDC now recommends that everyone wear cloth face coverings in public, especially in grocery stores and pharmacies, it’s more important than ever to make sure your face is properly covered. You can easily sew your own mask if you have fabric scraps and basic sewing skills, but just in case you need protection in a pinch, we’ve got you covered.

We’ve followed the U.S. Surgeon General’s guidelines to create an easy-to-follow visual demonstration of how to make your own no-sew mask from something as simple as a cotton bandana (we found ours at Tractor Supply), t-shirt, or hand towel, plus a set of elastics and a standard coffee filter.

What you need:

  • 2 rubber bands, hair elastics, or similar
  • cotton bandana, t-shirt, or similar cotton fabric
  • coffee filter or paper towel

While a bandana provides a basic level of coverage the CDC also recommends adding a coffee filter or similar paper material as an added layer of protection against potentially harmful particles in the air. For easy instructions, watch the video above, and simply add the filter as you fold the bandana, as shown below.

How to cover your face with a bandana

As we mentioned, a bandana is great in a pinch, but cotton fabrics with a tighter weave (like quilting fabrics or flannel) have proven to be even more effective. You can use the same no-sew folding method for any fabric square!

Don’t forget: The CDC recommends machine-washing your mask or face covering—in this case, your bandana— on a regular basis, especially if you’re wearing the mask frequently.

Learn about the different types of face masks that help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Last updated: 22 April 2022

Latest COVID settings

Household and close contacts

Household and close contacts do not need to self-isolate if they do not have any symptoms, but must follow NSW Health household and close contact guidelines.

People who test positive to COVID-19 must continue to self-isolate for 7 days from the date of their positive test and follow the testing positive to COVID-19 and managing COVID-19 safely at home advice.

Unvaccinated international arrivals

Unvaccinated international arrivals are no longer required to undertake hotel quarantine. These passengers now follow the same guidelines as fully vaccinated international arrivals and take a rapid antigen test within 24 hours of arrival.

When to wear a face mask

It is recommended to wear a face mask when you can’t physically distance from others.

In some settings in NSW, it is mandatory to wear a face mask, including

  • at a public hospital or private health facility (including private hospitals and day procedure centres)
  • in residential care facilities or hostels
  • in indoor music festivals with more than 1,000 people
  • on public transport and public transport waiting areas (including in taxis and rideshare services)
  • at a cruise terminal
  • in airports and on a domestic commercial aircraft (including when the aircraft is flying above NSW).

If you are over the age of 12 and are a household or close contact of someone who has tested positive to COVID-19, you must also wear a face mask when you are in an indoor setting that is not your own home, including workplaces and tertiary education settings. School settings may have their own guidance for students which should be followed.

From Monday 28 February, school staff and students are no longer required to wear masks in NSW schools.

Household contacts must wear a mask if they are in an indoor setting that is not their own home, including work or tertiary education settings. Understand more by reading household and close contact guidelines.

Experts weigh in on the new CDC recommendations and share easy yet effective DIY face covering tips.

As more information about the coronavirus pandemic develops, some of the information in this story may have changed since it was last updated. For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, please visit the online resources provided by the CDC, WHO, and your local public health department.

Homemade face masks have now become essential items during the COVID-19 pandemic, after the CDC recently changed its guidelines to say that everyone should wear some form of a cloth face covering in public places. If buying a mask or sewing one isn’t ideal for you, it’s surprisingly easy to make a DIY face mask with materials you already have at home.

Keep in mind: just because you’re supposed keep your face covered doesn’t mean you should go on the hunt for hospital-approved N-95 respirators. These are not recommended for anyone other than healthcare professionals working directly with coronavirus patients. Hospitals are in dire need of these types of masks, so it’s best to save the N-95 ones for them. Homemade versions are still a great choice and can be more comfortable and effective than simply tying a bandana or scarf around your face.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Do fabric face masks really protect you from coronavirus?

The CDC has reported that wearing face masks can help slow the spread of COVID-19. But it’s not as simple as it sounds and it works best if they’re worn by everyone in places where social distancing is difficult, like grocery stores and pharmacies.

The real reason the CDC recommends covering your face in public is because people can have no symptoms and still be COVID-19 positive without realizing it. As a result they can spread the novel coronavirus by coughing, sneezing, or even just speaking around others. Wearing the masks can help prevent the transmission of the virus from people that are contagious without knowing it.

Just remember that fabric face masks are not as effective as CDC-approved ones like surgical masks or N-95 respirators. You should still practice social distancing by staying at home as much as possible and follow other recommendations, like the six-foot rule to keep space between yourself and others.

Which fabric is best for a face mask?

The best fabric for a homemade face mask is tightly woven, 100% cotton. You can use a bandana or fabric from pillowcases, curtains, woven shirts, or anything else you might have in your home. You can also use a T-shirt, but it’s not our top choice because the fabric is knit (i.e. it can create holes when it stretches).

You’ll also need something to keep the mask snug on your face. You can use hair ties or rubber bands to secure them on your ears, but shoelaces, string or ribbon that you can tie around the back of your head may feel more comfortable.

To make the mask even more protective, you can use a coffee filter inside to help block particles. You can also add a metal piece (like a paper clip or twist tie from a bag of bread) to help it fit more securely around your nose.

Some seamstresses have found that shop towels (normally used by auto-mechanics) can filter particles better than other at-home face mask materials. At this point, these haven’t been tested by medical labs and aren’t yet recommended by the CDC, so for the sake of personal-use masks, you can stick with the materials you already have at home.

How to make a DIY face mask without a sewing machine:

We consulted Amanda Perna, Project Runway alum and fashion designer behind House of Perna, who has been donating homemade face masks to hospitals after having to close her studio during the coronavirus outbreak. Here is Amanda’s quick and easy tutorial for making a no-sew face mask at home without having to buy new supplies:

  1. Lay out a bandana or cut a 22″x 22″ square of cotton fabric
  2. Place a flat coffee filter in the center of the square (optional)
  3. Fold the top and bottom in towards the center
  4. Place a twist tie, paper clip, or other metal piece close to the top (optional)
  5. Fold the top and bottom in towards the center
  6. Fold the sides in towards the center, placing your ties at the folded crease. If you’re using rubber bands or hair ties, loop these around the fabric. If you’re using shoelaces or string, place the center of the string in the folded crease and pull the straps tight
  7. Tuck one end of the fabric into the other
  8. Lift the mask to your face and secure the straps. For hair ties and rubber bands, loop them over each ear. For shoelaces and string, tie them behind your head
  9. Adjust as needed, making sure your mouth and nose are completely covered

Check out the video above of Amanda’s step-by-step instructions in action.

We all wish we could have naturally thick and luscious hair forever, however, thinning hair is a problem many women (and men) face on the regular. There are many reasons why your hair may be thinning, including age, over-processing your hair, stress, using the incorrect products, conditions like Alopecia, and more.

If you find yourself constantly asking, “Why is my hair falling out?” and wondering how to hide thinning hair, we’ve got some answers for you.

The simplest answer is age. As we age, our hair, just like our skin, does too. Our scalp begins to produce less hairs, and the hair strands themselves get thinner. If you feel that you are too young and spritely to be experiencing hair loss, you may be performing some bad habits contributing to your thinning tresses.

Luckily, there are a few tips and tricks for those experiencing hair loss to hide this issue.

1. Chop it off

An easy way to quickly create the illusion of thick, full hair is to snip a few inches off and add some layers. Shorter hair tends to naturally create more volume as it is not weighed down. Strategic layers can also add volume to thinning hair – request your hair stylist to add layers around your face and to leave the back fuller, to create body and volume.

How to cover your face with a bandana

2. Embrace the greys

As hair ages, it also greys, and guess what? Grey hair actually expands the hair’s cuticle, adding additional volume! If you really can’t stand those greys, however, plan to touch up your roots only once a month and add highlights every two to three weeks to keep your hair as healthy, full, and thick and possible.

3. Blow it out

Adding big volume can be achieved with a good blowout after washing your hair. The best part is, this can be done at home with one simple tool: the round brush. Using a boar bristle brush, start blow-drying damp hair by pulling section up and blow-drying in the opposite direction that the hair naturally falls. Be sure to add an additional blast of cool air for a few seconds before letting go, to set the style. You may want to warm up those arms, as this does require some extra effort and time, but trust me, it’s totally worth it!

Check out the video below, to learn how to style an epic blow-out:

4. Get some help

Hair extensions, hair toppers, and wiglets are all amazing resources to disguise thin hair and instantly add amazing length and volume. For hair that is thinning at the top of the scalp, a hair topper can be a lifesaver as they are designed to target as conceal partial hair loss. These are especially helpful for those experiencing bald spots due to alopecia. You can even combine a hair topper with Luxy Hair extensions to create that full, Victoria’s Secret model hairstyle you’ve always dreamed of! Our 220g sets are perfect for those looking to add drama and oomph to the hair. We recommend to check out this blog post to learn how to blend Luxies with thinner hair for a beautiful, seamless blend.

How to cover your face with a bandana

5. Products to hide thinning hair

A volumizing shampoo combats limpness and puffs up the hair to hide thinning and is a great prerequisite to that blow-out we mentioned earlier. Choose a shampoo that is alcohol and sulfate-free is as these ingredients can be very harsh on the hair and further lead to hall fallout and thinning. You can also add additional volume by working a volumizing mouse through the hair before blow drying. Again, try and stay away from ingredients you can’t pronounce, as these can weigh the hair down.

Volumized hair is all well and good, however, if your scalp is still peeking through, there are products to help further disguise this issue. Conceal scalp lines, bald spots, and thinning hair with hair building fibres that come in many different shades to instantly transform hair and create the look of ample volume. Products like Toppik are created with high grade Keratin, which is the same protein found in natural hair. These Hair Building Fibers have a natural static charge, which tightly bind to the hair to build it up. As the fibers are created with Keratin, they blend naturally and undetectably into the hair! Be careful though, there are many imitation products that use Keratin derived from plant-based materials, cotton, or rayon, which can end up looking unnatural or clumpy. When shopping for Hair Building Fibers, ensure that the Keratin has been derived from a natural wool source, as this contains a natural static charge for the most natural blend possible.

So. how do I prevent hair loss?

Now that we’ve covered how to hide thinning hair, here are some hair growth tips to preventing thinning hair and boosting hair growth.

Hair oils are our fave, as certain oils promote certain benefits to the hair. Castor Oil is rich in Vitamin E, proteins, and minerals, and has anti-microbial properties that works wonders for the hair! Not only does Castor Oil soften and moisturize the hair, it promotes blood circulation in the scalp, which can lead to faster hair growth. To use Castor Oil in your hair, apply it on scalp and run through the hair, leave it in overnight, and wash it with a mild shampoo the next day. This oil is quite thick and can be a bit difficult to wash out, however, with regular use, your hair should grow thick, moisturized, and lustrous. Here are a few of our other favourite hair oils for gorgeous hair.

How to cover your face with a bandana

Supplements like Biotin or Vitamin H are also great for promoting healthy hair, skin, and nails. You can take biotin as an extra supplement or in your daily diet – foods like egg yolk, almonds, nut butters, bananas, and whole grains are packed with biotin – be sure to eat them raw to get the full effect of this vitamin for hair growth.

Taking super hot showers, is also a big no-no when it comes to keeping you hair as healthy and thick as possible. Hot water and steam dehydrates the hair, causing brittle strands that are more prone to breakage and fall out. Instead, turn down the heat to medium, and try and rinse your hair with cold water – we know, this can be super difficult when it’s freezing cold outside, but your hair will thank you!

After showers, pat dry your hair and refrain from aggressively towel drying, as this could lead to breakage and shedding. Comb your locks with a paddle brush BEFORE showering, and refrain from brushing the hair when wet.

When choosing your hair style, keep it loose! Tight ponytails and hairstyles can put excessive tension on hair follicles, which can damage and permanently destroy them. This could even lead to traction alopecia, making hair impossible to grow back. Check out our YouTube channel for many beautiful loose hairstyle ideas.

How to cover your face with a bandana

For additional tips and tricks to preventing thinning hair and promoting hair growth, be sure to watch the video below and check out this blog post where Mimi shares her own special words of advice.